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Terrestrial Animal Products and By-products: Import Policy Framework
10 Commodity-specific information

Note: The commodity-specific information below is not exclusive and may apply in addition to the general information provided above. Where established import conditions exist for a specific commodity, they may be found in AIRS. If conditions are not found in AIRS, the commodity may need to be evaluated according to the policy: Request to import a new commodity or import from a new country of origin. Templates of import conditions, as they become available, will be posted on the Import Policies – Animal Products and By-Products page of the CFIA website.

10.1 Manure

10.1.1 Legislative authority

Health of Animals Regulations

Part IV – Importation of Animal By-products, Animal Pathogens and other Things

  • 40
  • 41(1) and (2)
  • 47.1
  • 50

Part XIV – Food for Ruminants, Livestock and Poultry, Rendering Plants, Fertilizers and Fertilizer Supplements

  • 171.2

Note: Imported fertilizers must also comply with the Fertilizers Act and the Fertilizers Regulations.

10.1.2 Policy statement

Imports of animal manure and fertilizer containing animal manure are capable of transmitting animal diseases and hazards that may threaten Canada's livestock and poultry resources.

This import policy relates to Terrestrial Animal Health import requirements and does not remove any obligation of the Canadian importer to comply with the import requirements of other Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) programs and/or departments, (such as the Fertilizer and Horticulture Sections of the Plant Protection Division), or other Government of Canada Department requirements.

10.1.3 Scope of commodities covered by this section

  • Animal manure to be used as fertilizer from birds or from any mammals except a member of the orders Rodentia, Cetacea, Pinnipedia and Sirenia
  • Organic fertilizers and composted growing medium containing animal manure

Note: Manure imported for laboratory and research end-uses would be subject to the requirements under the Laboratory and Research Samples section of this policy.

10.1.4 Not within the scope of this section

  • Fertilizers containing no animal-origin ingredients
  • Manure from species other than birds or mammals (Note: Earthworm castings may be regulated under the CFIA Plant Protection Division)
  • Manure from mammals that are members of the orders Rodentia, Cetacea, Pinnipedia and Sirenia
  • Fertilizer containing other regulated ingredients of animal origin (i.e. rendered ingredients)

10.1.5 Roles and responsibilities

Note: This is not an exhaustive list.

Policy and Programs Branch - Animal Import-Export Division (AIED)

Policy and Programs Branch – Plant Protection Division

10.1.6 Additional import requirements

One or more of the following requirements may apply:

  1. Treatment to destroy pathogens: see Annex 1 for acceptable treatments of manure
  2. Record-keeping requirements to facilitate a recall if the product contains prohibited material
  3. Commodities containing rendered products blended with manure may also require an import permit under the Health of Animals Regulations, Section 166(1) – Importation of Products of Rendering Plants (see Rendered products section of this document)

10.2 Integumentary tissues and animal-origin display items

10.2.1 Legislative authority

Health of Animals Regulations

Part IV: Importation of Animal By-products, Animal Pathogens and other Things

  • 40 and 41 - Importation Prohibited
  • 42 - Raw Wool, Hair or Bristles, Hide or Skin
  • 45 – Gluestock
  • 50 - General

Part X: General Provisions

  • 107 (disinfection at an approved establishment)

10.2.2 Policy statement

This policy deals with the importation of integumentary tissues of mammals and avian species. The importation of integumentary tissues from reptiles and amphibians is not regulated by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA).

This policy relates to Animal Import/Export Division import requirements only and does not remove any obligations from the Canadian importer to comply with the import requirements of other CFIA programs and/or other federal, provincial, or municipal government departments. Integumentary tissues imported as pet chews and treats are covered under the Pet chews or Pet food sections of this policy.

The importation of many commodities in this policy requires approval from the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). The Canadian Wildlife Service of Environment Canada implements and administers CITES for the federal government of Canada. Importers are therefore strongly encouraged to contact CITES prior to importation to ensure that trade in each commodity is permitted.

Hides and skins are commonly traded as wet salted (also termed "green salted hides"), dry salted, pickled, air dried, or in the blue (or wet blue). Several of these preparation procedures may decrease the pathogen load on hides and skins, but do not necessarily eliminate all microorganisms. Therefore, a system of post-arrival disinfection has been created for the handling of these items when they are not clean or when they originate from non-designated countries.

Trophies containing skulls and horns originating from animals over 30 months of age of the Bos taurus or Bos indicus species are considered Specified Risk Material if the originating country is of controlled or undetermined risk for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), as defined by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE). For this reason, trophies imported from these countries and from Bos taurus or Bos indicus animals require an SRM permit and an Animal Health import permit.

10.2.3 Scope of commodities covered by this section

  • Raw wool, hair or bristles
  • Untanned hides and skins
  • Furs or pelts that have not been fully dressed
  • Bones, skulls, teeth and tusks
  • Hooves, horns and antlers
  • Feathers

10.2.4 Integumentary and animal-origin display items that may be imported without CFIA requirements

  • Fully tanned leather and leather products
  • Fully dressed furs and fur products
  • Skins of wool and knitted wool products
  • Souvenir items made from washed and dyed feathers
  • Feather fishing lures
  • Professionally mounted fish and reptiles

10.2.5 Roles and responsibilities

Note: This is not an exhaustive list.

Operations Branch

  • Inspection and approval of disinfection establishments
  • Inspection of imported items for freedom from visible contamination (for example, soil, manure, plant material, blood, ectoparasites etc.) and if necessary licensing items to approved disinfection establishments under official control to be processed such that any pathogens are destroyed prior to release

Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)

  • Referral of imported items to the CFIA for inspection for freedom from visible contamination (for example, soil, manure, plant material including straw or hay, blood, ectoparasites etc.)

Environment Canada

10.2.6 Additional import requirements

One or more of the following requirements may apply:

  1. Inspection at the border inspection port

    Some commodities may require a visual inspection at the border inspection port. During this inspection, if any specimen is found dirty or contaminated with soil, manure, plant material including straw or hay, blood, ectoparasites etc., the item will not be released. The item would either need to be removed from Canada, destroyed, or taken to an approved disinfection establishment under official control.

  2. Post-entry disinfection

    Some items must be directed to pre-approved premises for disinfection after arrival at the border inspection port. Documentation to verify that the premises has been approved must be provided by the importer to the CFIA at the time of importation. The premises approval must have been carried out not more than 24 months prior to the importation. If no premises has been approved, the items may be retained for a maximum of 30 days awaiting premises approval. If no premises approval has been obtained in 30 days, the items are to be refused entry and either destroyed or returned to the country of origin at the importer's expense.

  3. Proof of origin

    Some items from the U.S. (United States of America) may be released with documentation stating that the origin of the item is the U.S. provided that the documentation is considered acceptable by CBSA. Examples may include:

    • Untanned hides and skins
    • Animal and bird carcasses and trophies that are not prepared and are not mounted and that will be used for taxidermy (see point 4 "SRM permit" below on bovine skulls/ trophies)
    • Hoofs and horns that have not been processed
    • Museum specimens that have not been processed
    • Wool, feathers, and down that have not been processed
    • Furs that have not been dressed
  4. SRM permit

    Items that are considered Specified Risk Material (SRM), such as bovine skulls from animals greater than 30 months of age are required to comply with any applicable requirements of the CFIA SRM program, including any applicable permits (transport permit, storage permit etc.). Details regarding the SRM program may be found at the following link: Enhanced Animal Health Protection from BSE - Specified Risk Material (SRM).

  5. Processing

    Items that have undergone treatment or preservation in the country of origin such that pathogens are destroyed and the item will not decompose at ambient temperature may present a low level of risk of introducing diseases of concern into Canada. Treatments may include boiling, salting, drying, a change in pH, baking, immersion in peroxide etc. Examples of items that have undergone such treatments may include:

    • Fully tanned hides and skins
    • Professionally prepared taxidermy specimens in display form
    • Washed wool, feathers or down (please see Annex 2 for a list of acceptable treatments for feathers)

    These items may still, however, be subject to visual inspection at the border inspection port and must be scrupulously clean in order to be released into Canada. AIRS and the Centre of Administration (CoA) must be consulted to confirm import requirements for the specific item.

10.3 Contaminated things

10.3.1 Legislative authority

Health of Animals Act

  • Section 14 – Regulations prohibiting importation
  • Section 16 – Importation into Canada
  • Section 18 – Removal or destruction of unlawful imports
  • Section 55 – Packing material

Health of Animals Regulations

Part X: General Provisions

  • 105(3) - Disinfection

10.3.2 Policy statement

Imported things including used equipment and settler's personal effects, if not adequately cleaned, are capable of transmitting animal diseases which could threaten the health of Canada's animal populations. The CFIA requires that these items are properly cleaned and void of any visible organic matter prior to their release at the border inspection port.

10.3.3 Scope of commodities covered by this section

Note: Other commodity-specific sections of this policy and other CFIA programs may also apply to some of the below mentioned commodities.

This is not an exhaustive list.

  • Any items or "things" contaminated by animal manure, urine, blood, or other bodily secretions, earth, dirt and related matter, clay, silt, sand, soil minerals, humus, compost, earthworm castings, muck, plant litter and debris, either individually or in combination
  • Used motor vehicles, motorcycles, all-terrain vehicles and bicycles
  • Farm vehicles, tractors and implements; agricultural equipment, farm tools, garden tools, and garden furniture
  • Vehicles and equipment owned by the Department of National Defence and Canadian Forces or allies
  • Animal equipment, saddles, halters, bridles, livestock blankets, and feeding utensils; food bowls, brushes, buckets
  • Footwear and farm clothing
  • Plant propagation equipment
  • Containers, bags, boxes, crates, skids, pallets
  • Therapeutic agents, livestock medicines
  • Straw or other organic packing material
  • Meat-cutting and processing equipment

10.3.4 Not within the scope of this section

  • New commercially packaged items still in their original packaging and void of any contaminants

10.3.5 Roles and responsibilities

Note: This is not an exhaustive list.

Policy and Programs Branch (Plant Protection)

  • Provision of sanitary requirements for imported things under the authority of the Plant Protection Act and Regulations (Note: it is recommended that the importer confirm whether there are any applicable requirements under the CFIA Plant Protection program)

CBSA

  • Inspect imported shipments for compliance at the port of entry
  • Refer shipments to CFIA for further inspection if necessary

CFIA Operations

  • Inspect shipments referred by CBSA for cleanliness
  • Approve disinfection premises
  • License shipments to approved disinfection premises if required

Importer/Traveller

  • Ensure all items entering Canada are thoroughly cleaned of any visible contamination
  • present all items for inspection at the border inspection port and, if applicable, to the CFIA upon entry into Canada
  • If applicable, transport items under official control to an approved disinfection establishment for cleaning and disinfection
  • Covering all costs associated with inspection, transport, cleaning, disinfection, or disposal if applicable

10.3.6 Additional import requirements

One or more of the following requirements may apply:

  • An item that is not completely free of visible contamination should either be ordered removed from Canada or sent to an approved disinfection establishment under CFIA supervision (Note: An item with a thin layer of dust believed to have accumulated on the item during transportation would not be considered out of compliance)
  • Items must be thoroughly inspected for cleanliness including the underside, nooks, crevices, wheel wells etc.
  • Items that are required to be transported to an inland inspection warehouse or to a disinfection establishment must be transported in a manner such that any potentially contaminated material is contained and will not be released into the environment (for example, an item may need to be wrapped securely in a tarpaulin (tarp) or placed in a sealed container during transport if it would otherwise be exposed to the outdoor environment)

10.4 Milk products

10.4.1 Legislative authority

Health of Animals Regulations

Part III - Importation of Animal Products

  • 34(1) and 34.1– Dairy Products and Certain Eggs

10.4.2 Policy statement

Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD) is a pathogen of particular concern in milk products due to its ability to be shed in the milk of an infected animal and to survive pasteurization. An FMD outbreak could also have a devastating impact on Canada's livestock populations and international trade. Risk-based regulatory controls placed on the import of milk products are therefore focused on preventing the introduction of FMD into Canada. However, it should be noted that other diseases may also be taken into consideration in the development of import conditions based on various factors.

10.4.3 Scope of commodities covered by this section

  • Milk (lacteal secretion obtained from the mammary gland of any ruminant)
  • Partly skimmed milk
  • Skim milk
  • Cream
  • Butter
  • Buttermilk
  • Butter oil
  • Whey
  • Whey butter
  • Whey cream
  • Products containing regulated milk ingredients (for human or animal consumption)

in concentrated, dried, frozen, reconstituted or fresh form, but does not include single type (homogeneous) milk proteins, milk sugars and milk enzymes when for human consumption.

10.4.4 Not within the scope of this section

  • Foods commonly recognized as dairy products that are not covered under the Health of Animals Regulations such as kashkh, yogurt, ice cream and kephir
  • Food safety or public health requirements (refer to Food Imports)
  • Premises licensing or approval
  • Packaging and labelling requirements
  • Interprovincial movement of milk products
  • Export of milk products
  • The import of milk enzymes, milk proteins or milk sugars, such as the examples listed below:
    • Catalase
    • Lipase
    • Peroxydase
    • Phosphatase
    • Casein
    • Lactalbumin
    • Lactoferrin
    • Whey protein:
      • Alpha-lactoglobulin
      • Beta-lactoglobulin
      • Proteose peptones
  • Transferrin
  • Lactose (composed of glucose and galactose)

10.4.5 Roles and responsibilities

Note: This is not an exhaustive list.

CFIA Food Import Export Division (FIED)

  • Determination of public health requirements for milk products intended for human consumption

CFIA Animal Import/Export Division

  • Evaluation of the veterinary infrastructure and animal disease status of an exporting country, prior to allowing any importation, in collaboration with CFIA's Science Branch Animal Health Risk Assessment (AHRA) Unit
  • Provision of animal health requirements to the FIED for milk products intended for human consumption

CFIA Feeds Division

  • Determination of requirements under the Feeds Act and Regulations for the import of animal feeds and feed ingredients, including milk ingredients

10.4.6 Additional import requirements

One or more of the following requirements may apply

  • Proof of origin (such as a Canada Customs Invoice)
  • Labelling requirements
  • Treatment requirements such as pasteurization, Ultra-High Temperature (UHT), or low final pH (please see Annex 3 for further details)

Foods for human consumption containing milk ingredients may require one or more of the following, depending on the animal disease risk:

  • Import declaration
  • Zoosanitary export certificate
  • Originating from a country or zone designated free by Canada from foot and mouth disease

10.4.7 Other applicable legislation for milk products

Milk and milk products may also be required to comply with other legislation which may include, but is not limited to, the following

It is the importer's responsibility to comply with all applicable legislation.

10.5 Rendered products

10.5.1 Legislative authority

Health of Animals Regulations

Part IV: Importation of Animal By-products, Animal Pathogens and other Things

  • 46 - Meat and Bone meal, Bone Meal, Blood Meal, Tankage, Feather Meal, Fish Meal, Rendering Plant Products, Animal Manure, Garbage and Ship's Refuse
  • 52 – Importation Permitted (Note: This section allows the CFIA to make exceptions to the Animal Health requirements of Part IV if properly documented treatment has taken place, or in accordance with an import permit)

Part XIV: Food for Ruminants, Livestock and Poultry, Rendering Plants, Fertilizers and Fertilizer Supplements

  • 166 – Importation of Products of Rendering Plants (Note: all products of a rendering plant require an import permit for entry into Canada)
  • 167 – Importation or Sale of Products of Rendering Plants
  • 167.1 (2) – Recall Procedures

Note: Imported fertilizers must also comply with the Fertilizers Act and the Fertilizers Regulations. It is advisable to confirm the requirements of the CFIA Fertilizers Program.

Note: Imported feeds must also comply with the Feeds Act and Feeds Regulations. It is also advisable to confirm the requirements of the CFIA Feeds Program.

10.5.2 Policy statement

Rendered products include the commodities listed below in Section 11.5.3. Some examples of end-uses may include manufacturing of fertilizer, animal feed and pet food. Rendered animal by-products could potentially spread animal pathogens, particularly if they are incorporated into food for animals. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) as well as other Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSEs) are diseases of particular concern in rendered products due to the potential for these pathogens to survive the rendering processes. Risk-based regulatory controls placed on the import of rendered products are particularly focused on preventing the introduction of BSE (and other TSEs) into Canada, however other diseases of concern are also taken into consideration.

Canada accepts the OIE classification for country BSE risk categorization. Therefore, CFIA does not routinely carry out independent assessment regarding a country's BSE categorization. The CFIA's country BSE status listings can be found in the policy Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Import Policy for Bovine Animals and Their Products and By-Products.

10.5.3 Scope of commodities covered by this section

  • Meals (for example, blood meal, bone meal, feather meal, fish meal, meat meal)
  • Greaves
  • Tallow
  • Suet
  • Rendered fats and oils (for example, fish oil)
  • Digests (for example, poultry digest)
  • Fertilizer containing rendered products (Note: fertilizer containing tallow may be exempt from requirements of the Fertilizers program, but Animal Health requirements may still apply)

10.5.4 Not within the scope of this section

  • Fats and oils for human consumption
  • Fertilizer containing unprocessed manure as the only animal-origin ingredient
  • Processed pet food
  • Raw inedible products that have not undergone a rendering process

10.5.5 Roles and responsibilities

Note: This is not an exhaustive list.

CFIA Policy and Programs Branch – Animal Import Export Division

  • Review and approval of the rendering system in a foreign country prior to allowing the import of rendered products from that country

CFIA Animal Feed Division

  • Determination of requirements under the Feeds Act and Feeds Regulations for the import of animal feeds, including those containing rendered ingredients

CFIA Operations Branch:

Competent veterinary authority of the exporting country

Importer

10.5.6 Additional import requirements

Templates of import conditions, as they become available, may be posted on the Import Policies – Animal Products and By-Products page of the CFIA website.

One or more of the following requirements may apply:

  1. Rendering system approval:

    Prior to allowing the import of rendered products into Canada from a particular country, CFIA Policy and Programs Branch along with technical support from Science Branch, must evaluate the rendering system of the foreign exporting country, including the system for regulatory oversight that is in place. The purpose of this approval is to ensure that the risk of transmission of animal diseases of concern to Canada is mitigated prior to allowing a product of a rendering plant to enter Canada.

  2. CFIA Facility Questionnaire for Export of Rendered Products to Canada:

    This document must be provided at least once per year for any rendering plant exporting a rendered product to Canada in order to obtain an import permit. It is completed by the competent authority of the exporting country following an inspection of the exporting premises. It places a particular emphasis on the handling and segregation of ruminant materials, avoidance of cross-contamination, and appropriate record-keeping.

  3. Certificate of analysis:

    A certificate of analysis is a laboratory report issued by an accredited third party laboratory stating the results of testing on a per shipment basis. This is commonly required for protein free tallow to verify that the shipment complies with the required level of insoluble impurities (less than or equal to 0.15%).

  4. Segregation protocol

    Some exporting facilities may handle multiple materials from various sources and not all of these materials may be eligible for import into Canada. If it is determined from the CFIA Facility Questionnaire for Export of Rendered Products to Canada that there are ineligible materials on site, a segregation protocol may be required detailing how export of ineligible materials to Canada will be prevented as well as how cross-contamination of eligible with ineligible materials will be prevented. This protocol must be endorsed by the competent authority of the exporting country.

10.6 Edible meat products

10.6.1 Legislative authority

Most meat products, unless they are exempt, are regulated under the authority of the Meat Inspection Act and Meat Inspection Regulations which pertain to food safety as well as the Health of Animals Act and the Health of Animals Regulations.

Health of Animals Regulations

Part IV: Importation of Animal By-products, Animal Pathogens and other Things

  • 40 and 41: Importation Prohibited
  • 43: Boneless Beef
  • 48: Ship's Stores
  • 49: Carcasses of Game Animals

10.6.2 Policy statement

The oversight of imports of meat and meat products for human consumption is jointly managed by the Food Import Export Division, who are responsible for public health requirements, and the Animal Import Export Division, who are responsible for animal health requirements.

The Annex A, found within Chapter 10 of the Meat Hygiene Manual of Procedures (MHMOP), contains all of the conditions which an exporting country has to meet in order to be eligible to export meat products for human consumption to Canada. There is a country-specific section of Annex A for all trading partners.

The import conditions found within a particular country's section of Annex A are negotiated with Canada's trading partners and are included in Official Meat Inspection Certificates (OMICs) which accompany the imported shipments. An exception to this occurs in the case of New Zealand and Australia where there is no need for a paper copy of the certificate as there is electronic certification in place with these two trading partners.

Commercial importation of meat and meat products for human consumption is only allowed from approved facilities in approved countries (exemptions are described below in Section 10.6.6 (1) Approved Establishments).

The approval of countries wishing to export meat and meat products to Canada is collaboratively managed by the CFIA's Animal Import-Export Division, Food Import-Export Division and Science Branch.

The eligibility of a country is based on an animal health evaluation as well as a meat systems evaluation, in order to determine if an exporting country can meet the CFIA's public and animal health requirements.

Information on the CFIA's Foreign Food Safety Recognition Process can be found online: Foreign Food Safety Systems Recognition Framework - About the Canadian Food Inspection Agency - Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

Animal Health import requirements for animal by-products for end-uses other than human consumption are the responsibility of the AIED.

Importation from countries that have not undergone an animal health evaluation must be assessed by the CFIA according to the policy Request to import a new commodity or import from a new country of origin.

10.6.3 Scope of commodities covered by this section

  • Dry-cured, salt-cured or air-dried meat (for example, prosciutto)
  • Fresh or frozen meat
  • Cooked meat
  • Canned meat
  • Casings
  • Edible fat for human consumption (for example, poultry fat)
  • Products containing more than 2% meat

10.6.4 Not within the scope of this section

  • Export, domestic movement, or other domestic regulation of meat
  • Food safety or public health
  • Trade tariffs
  • Provincial or territorial regulation of meat
  • The import of live animals destined for meat

Note: Raw inedible animal products are covered below in the Raw Inedible Products section of this document.

10.6.5 Roles and responsibilities

Note: This is not an exhaustive list.

Policy and Programs Branch

  • CFIA Meat Systems Evaluation and Foreign Country Relations
    • Responsible for the strengthening of government oversight of food (for human consumption) safety of imported food products through the assessment of foreign country inspection systems
    • Responsible for conducting on-site audits for the recognition of foreign inspection systems on the basis of equivalence, and publishing audit reports
    • Responsible for the maintenance assessment of foreign countries
    • Engage with foreign competent authorities and Canadian stakeholders on issues pertaining to the trade of food
  • CFIA Food Import Export Division (FIED), Meat Import
    • Responsible for the oversight, maintenance and publication of Annex A, MHMOP
    • Responsible for publishing public health import requirements for meat and meat products (for human consumption) in AIRS
    • Lead on export certificate negotiation with exporting countries
    • Liaise with technical experts of the concerned foreign competent authorities
  • CFIA Animal Import Export Division (AIED), Import/Export Animal Products and By-Products Section
    • Responsible for the evaluation of the veterinary infrastructure and animal disease status of an exporting country, prior to allowing any importation, in collaboration with CFIA's Science Branch, Animal Health Risk Assessment (AHRA) Unit
    • Responsible for the provision of animal health requirements for meat for human consumption to FIED–Meat Import for the purposes of export certificate negotiation
    • AIED-APABP Import provides feedback and comments on animal health requirements during the negotiation of import conditions
    • In collaboration with FIED–Meat Import, responsible to provide additional animal health requirements (outside of Annex A and negotiated certification statements) for publication in AIRS, i.e. import permits

Competent veterinary authority of the exporting country

  • Inspect the exporting premises in order to have them added to CFIA's list of approved establishments
  • Issue zoosanitary export certificates or OMICs after verifying compliance with Canadian import conditions

10.6.6 Additional import requirements

One or more of the following requirements may apply

  1. Approved establishments

    Meat products for human consumption imported from abattoirs or processing plants must come from premises on the list of CFIA approved establishments unless they are non-commercial shipments under 20 kg or a meat product, the total amount of which does not weigh more than 100 kg, destined and used for analysis, evaluation, testing, research or an international food exhibition. If a premises is not on the list of CFIA approved establishments, a request from the foreign competent authority is required in this respect and communication may be sent to MPDImport@canada.ca.

  2. Disease status recognition

    The import requirements will depend on animal health status of the exporting country, for example, a country, region or zone recognized as being free of diseases of concern to Canada which the imported species is susceptible to, as indicated in the Animal Health Status By Country page on the CFIA website.

  3. Annex A: Approved Countries (Countries from which commercial importation of meat products is permitted)

    For the importation of commercial shipments of meat, Annex A of the Meat Hygiene Manual of Procedures may be used to get information about various countries' approved meat inspection systems and the type of meat product eligible for export to Canada. If an edible meat product is not listed in Annex A, it is not permitted for import into Canada.

    Annex A also lists additional certification statements/attestations required on the OMIC and established Animal Health import conditions are outlined in this section.

  4. Official Meat Inspection Certificates (OMICs)

    If the commodity falls under the Meat Inspection Act and Regulations, and if certification is required, it will be certified using an Official Meat Inspection Certificate.

  5. Inspection at an approved Canadian establishment post import (Note: if applicable, this would be a requirement under the Food Program)

10.6.7 Imports of small volumes of meat

  1. Meat accompanying travellers for personal use

    Section 3(1) of the Meat Inspection Regulations lists exemptions (Meat Inspection Regulations, Section 3, "Meat Products Exempted from the Application of the Act") from Sections 7 to 9 (Export, Interprovincial Movement, and Import respectively) of the MIA, and item 3(1)(a) states "a shipment of meat products weighing 20 kg or less that is intended to be used for non-commercial purposes" (personal use). Non-commercial importations are for the personal use and consumption of the importer and are not intended for re-sale or distribution. Personal importations of meat that are exempt from the Meat Inspection Regulations are still subject to animal health conditions.

    Up to 20 kg per traveller of meat and poultry products, including fresh meat, may be imported from the United States for personal use. The contents must be clearly labelled and proof that the product originated in the United States may be required.

    From all other countries, a maximum of 20 kg of cooked, commercially prepared, commercially sterile, and shelf-stable (i.e. safe at room temperature) meat in hermetically sealed packaging may be imported per person. The packages must have identifying marks, indicating the product and the country of origin. Hermetically sealed packaging includes glass jars and cans, semi-rigid disposable serving dishes for ready-to-eat meals, and retort pouches. Fresh, dried, and cured meats are not permitted. If the meat is of bovine, ovine, or caprine origin (beef, lamb/mutton, or goat) it may only be imported from countries of negligible risk for Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE or mad cow disease).

    An OMIC is not required for personal importations of meat. The exporting premises are not required to be on CFIA's approved list of establishments.

  2. Samples

    Importations of meat or meat products not exceeding 100 kg that are destined for analysis, evaluation, testing, research, or an international food exhibition are exempted from the requirements of the MIR. However, Animal Health requirements such as an import permit and zoosanitary certificate may still apply. Public health requirements also apply under the Food and Drugs Regulations, even for samples exempt from the MIR.

    Carcasses of game animals

    Section 49 of the HAR outlines requirements applicable to the import of carcasses of game animals from the United States. For imports of carcasses of game animals from other countries a risk assessment would be required according to the policy Request to import a new commodity or import from a new country of origin.

10.6.8 Ships' stores

In order to allow meat and meat products to be carried on a ship such that the introduction of animal disease into Canada is prevented, the meat or meat by-product must be kept on the ship as ships' stores according to section 48 of the HAR.

10.7 Raw inedible products

10.7.1 Legislative authority

Health of Animals Regulations

Part IV: Importation of Animal By-products, Animal Pathogens and other Things

  • Sections 40 and 41 – Importation Prohibited

10.7.2 Policy statement

Since raw inedible animal products and by-products have not undergone a pathogen-destroying processing method, they present an increased risk of disease introduction into Canada. The Automated Import Reference System (AIRS) should be consulted to determine whether established import conditions exist, and if they do not then the CFIA may need to develop new conditions according to the policy Request to import a new commodity or import from a new country of origin. Raw inedible products may only be imported from countries and establishments approved for export to Canada. Please refer to Annex A of the Meat Hygiene Manual of Procedures for a list of approved countries.

10.7.3 Scope of commodities covered by this section

  • Ingredients for pet food (for example, meat, organs, carcasses)
  • Ingredients for pharmaceuticals (for example, pancreas used for insulin production)
  • Ingredients for industrial and manufacturing end-uses
  • Raw inedible products destined for rendering in Canada
  • Raw inedible products for livestock feed, where permitted

10.7.4 Not within the scope of this section

  • Rendered products
  • Products that have undergone a pathogen-destroying processing step
  • Products intended for human consumption

10.7.5 Roles and responsibilities

Note: This is not an exhaustive list.

  • AIED APABP Import
    • Responsible for the negotiation of animal health import requirements for raw inedible APABP (not for human consumption)

10.7.6 Additional import requirements

One or more of the following requirements may apply

  1. Zoosanitary certificates

    A zoosanitary certificate is used to certify the required animal health statements. Raw inedible products from some of the countries designated by the CFIA as free of diseases of concern have established import conditions and negotiated zoosanitary certificates. Templates of import conditions, as they become available, may be posted on the Import Policies – Animal Products and By-Products page of the CFIA website.

  2. Import permit

    An importer may apply for an import permit for raw inedible commodities from countries not recognized free of diseases of concern for the species of origin. A risk evaluation may be required.

  3. Denaturation

    All inedible meat products must be denatured before import. Denaturing consists of application of an approved agent that alters the appearance of an inedible product so that it is easily identifiable as unfit for human consumption. Exceptions may rarely be made for products that are not likely to be mistaken for edible meat such as gastrointestinal tracts.

  4. Labelling requirements

    Each container or pallet should have the following information on the label

    1. The identity of the inedible meat product in terms that is descriptive of the product (for example, denatured beef lungs, de-characterized pork livers)
    2. The words "Product of" followed by the name of the exporting country
    3. Wording to state the end use such as "for animal food", "for medicinal purposes/pharmaceutical use", or "not for human consumption," as appropriate
    4. The net quantity (weight)
    5. The name and address of the registered establishment where the inedible meat product was produced or labelled, or the person for whom the meat product was produced or labelled, preceded by the words "Prepared For"
    6. Storage instructions; "Keep Frozen, Keep Refrigerated" as applicable
    7. The words "Plant Number" followed by the Establishment number of the foreign establishment in which the meat product was prepared

10.8 Pet food

10.8.1 Legislative authority

Health of Animals Regulations

Part IV: Importation of Animal By-products, Animal Pathogens and other Things

  • 40 and 41 – Importation Prohibited

Part XIV: Food for Ruminants, Livestock and Poultry, Rendering Plants, Fertilizers and Fertilizer Supplements

  • 166 – Importation of Products of Rendering Plants
  • 167 – Importation or Sale of Products of Rendering Plants

10.8.2 Scope of commodities covered by this section

  • Pet food containing animal-origin ingredients (for example, dog food, cat food and food for other domestic pets) such as
    • Dry kibble
    • Semi-moist pet food
    • Canned pet food
    • Pet food diets containing raw animal products and by-products
  • Pet treats (for example, dog biscuits) (Note: this does not include pet chews which are covered in the Pet Chews section below)
  • Compound chews (Note: compound chews have the same import requirements as pet food and pet treats, whereas simple chews have different import requirements and are covered in the "Pet chews" section below)

Note: Any food for an animal species that is not regulated by the Feeds Act and Regulations may be regulated by the Health of Animals Act and Regulations if it contains animal-origin ingredients. (for example, food for laboratory or zoo animals)

10.8.3 Not within the scope of this section

  • Pet food containing no animal-origin ingredients
  • Pet chews (See the Pet chews section below)
  • Raw material intended for the manufacture of processed pet food
  • Feeds intended for livestock and covered under the authority of the Feeds Act and Feeds Regulations
  • Domestic production and sale of pet food

Note: Animal products and by-products used as ingredients for pet food manufacturing are not covered under this section and would be covered under other sections such as Rendered Products, Highly Processed Products or Raw Inedible Products.

10.8.4 Roles and responsibilities

Note: This is not an exhaustive list.

AIED APABP Import

  • Responsible for the negotiation of animal health import requirements for pet food containing animal-origin ingredients

Operations Branch

  • Responsible for reviewing premises questionnaires, and if compliant, issuing import permits accordingly

Importer

  • Responsible for ensuring that the facility questionnaire is completed for exporting pet food premises and that it is provided to the CFIA

Competent authority of the exporting country

  • Responsible for inspecting the exporting premises and completing the facility questionnaire

10.8.5 Pet food imported as samples for laboratory testing, diet trials, or for exhibition purposes

For pet food imported as samples for laboratory testing, for diet trials, or for exhibition purposes, the conditions may vary from those for commercial sale. Please consult AIRS for specific conditions and ensure to choose the correct end use.

10.8.6 Additional import requirements

One or more of the following requirements may apply

  1. Inspection and Annex 1 - Importation of Commercially Prepared Pet Food Facility Questionnaire for Risk Assessment

    For the export of commercial shipments of pet food, the exporting premises may require an inspection and a premises questionnaire completed and endorsed by an official of the competent authority of the exporting country on an annual basis. It will be reviewed by the CFIA and used to assess the risk of introduction of animal diseases of concern into Canada, and whether an import permit can be issued for pet food produced at the premises.

  2. Requirements for personal imports of pet food

    Travelers from the U.S. may bring into Canada a personal import of pet food (limit of 20 kg per animal per entry), if the import meets all of the following requirements

    • The pet food or product must be processed, of United States origin and commercially packaged
    • The pet food or product must be in the possession of the traveler at the time of entry from the U.S.
    • The animal that will eat the imported product must accompany the traveler at the time of entry
    • The imported product will be fed only to the animal that accompanied the traveler into Canada
    • It may either be wet or dry, in its original unopened bag or can
    • The label must clearly indicate the list of ingredients

10.9 Pet chews

10.9.1 Legislative authority

Health of Animals Regulations

Part IV: Importation of Animal By-products, Animal Pathogens and other Things

  • 40 and 41 – Importation Prohibited
  • 42 – Raw Wool, Hair or Bristles, Hide or Skin

10.9.2 Policy statement

Pet chews differ from pet treats or compound chews in that they have no nutritional value and are not intended to be consumed as a source of nourishment by the pet (see Definitions). Pet chews are often composed of materials obtained from livestock species and may not have been thoroughly processed at the time of manufacture such that all diseases of concern have been destroyed in the country of origin. Since pet chews are handled by domestic pets, it is unpredictable whether they could in turn be exposed to domestic livestock, thereby presenting a risk of introduction of animal diseases of concern into Canada. It is therefore necessary that the CFIA establishes controls on imported pet chews under the authority of the HAR in order to mitigate such risk.

10.9.3 Scope of commodities covered by this section

Animal-origin washed, heat-treated and dried single- or multi-ingredient pet chews made of

  • Rawhide
  • Ears
  • Pizzles
  • Hooves/feet
  • Tendons
  • Ligaments
  • Trachea/esophagus
  • Snouts
  • Tails
  • Bones
  • Other animal tissues

10.9.4 Not within the scope of this section

  • Pet products containing no animal-origin ingredients
  • Processed pet food, pet treats and compound pet chews

10.9.5 Roles and responsibilities

Note: This is not an exhaustive list.

AIED APABP Import

  • Responsible for the negotiation and development of animal health import requirements for pet chews containing animal-origin ingredients

Operations Branch

Importer

  • Responsible for ensuring that the facility questionnaire (if applicable) is completed for exporting pet chew premises and that it is provided to the CFIA

Competent authority of the exporting country

  • Responsible for inspecting the exporting pet chew manufacturing premises and completing the facility questionnaire if applicable

10.9.6 Additional import requirements

One or more of the following requirements may apply

  1. Heat treatment

    Pet chews, packed in final packaging or bulk, may be required to be subjected to a heat treatment sufficient to destroy microbial and/or pathogenic organisms, including salmonella.

  2. Avoidance of cross-contamination

    After heat treatment, every precaution must be taken to ensure that such pet chews are not exposed to contamination.

  3. Bacterial culture testing

    Testing by an independent accredited laboratory in the country of origin may be required.

    Each shipment must be accompanied by a Laboratory Certificate of Analysis, showing test results linked to the product(s) being imported into Canada. The bacterial testing protocol can be found in Annex 4.

  4. Zoosanitary certificate that may require one or more of the following statements

    1. That the product is dried (if basted, must be less than 12% moisture) and contains no other animal products or by-products
    2. That the country is free of the diseases of concern related to the species of animal used in the production of the chew
    3. That the product was subjected to a heat treatment to reach a minimum temperature of 85°C for a minimum of 5 hours
    4. The parameters of the heat treatment if different from the above
    5. The origin of the product
  5. Other

10.10 Laboratory and research samples

10.10.1 Legislative authority

Health of Animals Regulations

Part IV: Importation of Animal By-products, Animal Pathogens and other Things

  • 40 and 41 – Importation Prohibited
  • 42 – Raw Wool, Hair or Bristles, Hide or Skin: Part IV, Section 42.1 – Animal Glands and Organs
  • 50 – General
  • 51(c), 51.1 and 51.2 – Animal Pathogens, Animals or Other Organisms, Animal Blood and Animal Serum

Part X: General Provisions

  • 107 - Disinfection

10.10.2 Policy statement

Animal products and by-products may be imported into Canadian laboratories for research and testing, or may be imported for commercial distribution to laboratories in Canada. Import requirements depend upon the regulatory requirements outlined in the Health of Animals Act and Regulations by commodity.

In the case of commercial imports for distribution and sale to laboratories in Canada, a zoosanitary export certificate negotiated between Canada and the exporting country is required.

Information on rendered meals made from animal blood (bloodmeal) can be found under the Chapter on Rendered products.

Note: If Animal Health declines to issue an import permit due to a non-negligible level of risk, the importer may pursue obtaining a permit through the OBCS if compliant with their requirements

10.10.3 Scope of commodities covered by this section

  • Animal blood, serum and derivatives (antibodies)
  • Nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) of animal origin
  • Pathology slides containing animal tissues
  • Formalinized teaching cadavers
  • Other animal tissue samples and fluids
  • Animal cell lines
  • Any animal product or by-product for use in a laboratory or for research

10.10.4 Not within the scope of this section

  • Samples from members of the orders Rodentia, Cetacea, Pinnipedia, and Sirenia (lagomorphs are not rodents and are still regulated)
  • Veterinary biologics (see the Veterinary Biologics section of the CFIA website for further information)
  • Pathogens or commodities known or believed to contain pathogens, and samples obtained from non-human primates (contact the OBCS regarding such imports)
  • Commodities covered by the Highly Processed Products section of this policy

10.10.5 Roles and responsibilities

Note: This is not an exhaustive list.

The Office of Biohazard Containment and Safety (OBCS), Science Branch

  • Issuance of import permits under HAR Sections 51(a) and (b) for the following
    • Pathogens or commodities known or believed to contain pathogens, and samples obtained from non-human primates (contact the OBCS regarding such imports)

Animal Import Export Division, Policy and Programs Branch

  • Determine controls or conditions to be applied to the import of animal products and by-products when the commodities are not specifically known or believed to contain pathogens, and the risk level is considered negligible (Note: Animal Health PPB may refer applications to OBCS if it is felt that the risk cannot sufficiently be mitigated through an Animal Health permit)
  • Evaluate the disease status of the country of origin

Operations Branch

Veterinary Biologics (PPB)

10.10.6 Import requirements for animal products and by-products imported for commercial laboratory use

For commodities that are intended to be imported for commercial use and where negotiated conditions are not available in AIRS, importers are required to request an evaluation according to the policy Request to import a new commodity or import from a new country of origin. For example, a laboratory may routinely import bacterial culture medium containing fetal bovine serum from a commercial supplier in large quantities. In this case a zoosanitary certificate should be negotiated through PPB. This is in contrast to materials imported once or only a few times in small quantities which are generally the subject of the research, testing, or analysis and may not require a formally negotiated zoosanitary certificate.

10.10.7 Import requirements for laboratory and research samples

One or more of the following requirements may apply

  1. Laboratory approvals

    An approval of the importing laboratory may need to be conducted by the OBCS for compliance with established laboratory biocontainment and biosafety requirements of the Canadian Biosafety Standards (CBS), 2nd Edition - PDF (2250 kb). A valid compliance or certification letter issued by OBCS would need to be provided in order for an Animal Health import permit to be issued.

  2. Destruction/disposal requirements

    Requirements to properly destroy and/or dispose of any remaining material after the testing or research may be stipulated in the import permit. This may involve incineration, autoclaving, or other pathogen-killing procedures followed by disposal at an approved landfill site.

  3. Record-keeping requirements

    Record-keeping requirements may be included in import permits to facilitate ease and efficiency of tracing activities should they become necessary for disease-control purposes. Record-retention periods may also be included.

  4. Adequate treatment of samples

    In some cases treatments (such as heat) may be applied to samples to destroy pathogens and thereby mitigate disease risk. As per sections 41(1)(b) and (c), if a product is from a country that is not considered free of diseases of concern and it has not been adequately treated, the disease risk would not be sufficiently mitigated. In this case the shipment would not be allowed to enter Canada.

    In order for the CFIA to consider the use of a treatment process that has not yet been evaluated, a request must be made to CFIA Policy and Programs Branch, through the CoA, to evaluate this process. In some cases, a formal Risk Assessment request will be required, as per the CFIA policy Request to import a new commodity or import from a new country of origin.

  5. Restrictions to in vitro use only

    Restricting animal-origin samples to in vitro use only may be a condition stipulated in an import permit. The risk of disease transmission is considerably lower if the material is not exposed to, or introduced directly into live animals.

  6. Other:

    Additional conditions may be applied specific to the import.

10.11 Bee products

10.11.1 Legislative authority

Health of Animals Regulations

Part VI: Importation of Packing Material, Beehives and Beeswax

  • 57 – Beehives and Beeswax

10.11.2 Policy statement

Many viral, bacterial, fungal and parasitic diseases affect populations of honeybees. The most prevalent diseases and pests around the world which could further spread in Canada as a result of the importation of honeybee products are as follows

  1. Varroa mites (Varroa jacobsoni and Varroa destructor)
  2. Tracheal mites (Acarapis woodi)
  3. Small hive beetle (Aethina tumida)
  4. American foulbrood (Paenibacillus larvae)

Although some of these diseases and pests may already be present in various parts of Canada, in order to limit their impact and spread, mitigating measures may be placed on imports of bee products depending on their place of origin, the time of year of import, the destination within Canada and the end use.

10.11.3 Scope of commodities covered by this section

  • Beeswax (including wax cappings)
  • Bee propolis
  • Royal jelly
  • Honeycomb
  • Honey
  • Beehives
  • Bee pollen

(Note: "Pollen" is distinct from "bee pollen". Bee pollen has been collected by bees whereas pollen is obtained directly from plants by humans without having been in contact with bees. Bee pollen may have import requirements under the Animal Health program whereas pollen does not. However, pollen may have import requirements under the Plant Protection Program.)

10.11.4 Not within the scope of this section

  • Importation of live bees
  • Food safety or public health requirements (refer to Food Imports)
  • Packaging and labelling requirements
  • export of bee products
  • Pollen

(Note: "Pollen" is distinct from "bee pollen". Bee pollen has been collected by bees whereas pollen is obtained directly from plants by humans without having been in contact with bees. Bee pollen may have import requirements under the Animal Health program whereas pollen does not. However, pollen may have import requirements under the Plant Protection Program.)

10.11.5 Roles and responsibilities

Note: This is not an exhaustive list.

CFIA Food Import Export Division (FIED)

  • Determination of public health requirements for bee products intended for human consumption

CFIA Animal Import/Export Division

  • Provision of Animal Health requirements for the importation of bee products

CFIA Animal Feed Division

  • Determination of requirements under the Feeds Act and Regulations for the import of animal feeds, including those containing bee ingredients

10.11.6 Additional import requirements

Note: It is prohibited to import used beehives and bee equipment under Health of Animals Regulations paragraph 57 (a).

One or more of the following requirements may apply

  1. Absence of live honeybees or bee brood in the shipment

    Since live honeybees or bee brood can be a potential source of transmission of diseases of concern to Canada, it is essential that they are eliminated from any shipments of imported bee products prior to arrival in Canada.

  2. Irradiation

    Bee products may require irradiation at an acceptable establishment at 10 kGray to destroy pathogens, particularly if the product could potentially be exposed to bees while in Canada. A certificate would need to be presented to a CFIA inspector demonstrating that the irradiation was completed. Approved irradiation facilities, as they become available, will be posted on the Import Policies – Animal Products and By-Products page of the CFIA website.

  3. Country designation as free from bee diseases of concern

    If a shipment of a bee product is imported from a country that is designated as free of Small Hive Beetle, an export certificate may be required attesting to this freedom.

  4. Restrictions on the time of year of the importation

    If unprocessed beeswax is from a country of origin affected by Small Hive Beetle, the import permit may restrict the time of year during which the importation may take place as follows

    • It may only be imported between October 1st and March 31st into Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and the Northwest Territories
    • It may only be imported between December 1st and March 31st into British Columbia, Ontario, Quebec and the Maritime provinces
    • It may not be imported into Canada during the summer and fall
  5. Freezing the product

    A wax shipment may be required to be frozen, and the refrigerated transportation conveyance may be required to display a temperature reading of -20 degrees Celsius (-9 degrees Fahrenheit) upon reaching the port of entry into Canada.

  6. Approval of facility

    It may be required that the importation takes place into a facility previously approved by the CFIA for the rendering and processing of beeswax.

  7. Non-insulated building

    If the product is received into a non-insulated building in Canada during the times of year specified above, the conditions would be unfavourable for the survival of small hive beetle in the product.

  8. Professional extermination services

    Upon completion of the importing season (as outlined above) the receiving facility may be required to receive professional extermination services in order to destroy any remaining pests, and to provide a certificate of extermination to the CFIA.

  9. Incineration of wax debris

    It may be required that any wax debris in the transportation vehicles or storage buildings which is swept from the floors is to be incinerated as soon as possible, and is never to be swept outside.

10.12 Egg products

10.12.1 Legislative authority

Health of Animals Regulations

Part III: Importation of Animal Products

  • 34 – Dairy Products and Certain Eggs

10.12.2 Policy statement

Egg products could potentially spread animal pathogens such as Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza and Velogenic Newcastle Disease (VND). Outbreaks of these diseases can have detrimental impacts on Canada's poultry populations and international trade. Risk-based regulatory controls placed on the import of egg products are therefore focused on preventing the introduction of these diseases into Canada. However, it should be noted that other diseases may also be taken into consideration in the development of import conditions based on various factors.

10.12.3 Scope of commodities covered by this section

  • Whole egg
  • Egg shells
  • Egg yolk
  • Egg albumen
  • Any mix of these in a liquid, dried, frozen, preserved or fresh form
  • Edible bird's nests (other than cooked, canned, commercially sterile)
  • Balut

Note: Animal Health import requirements for egg products apply to eggs from any avian species.

10.12.4 Not within the scope of this section

  • Fertilized eggs intended for hatching
  • Food safety or public health requirements (refer to Food Imports)
  • Premises licensing or approval
  • Food labelling requirements
  • Interprovincial movement of egg products
  • Export of egg products

10.12.5 Roles and responsibilities

Note: This is not an exhaustive list.

CFIA Food Import Export Division (FIED)

  • Determination of public health requirements for egg products intended for human consumption

CFIA Animal Import/Export Division

  • Provision of animal health requirements for egg products for human consumption to FIED

10.12.6 Additional import requirements

One or more of the following requirements may apply

  1. Zoosanitary Certificate attesting to the processing method (see Annex 5 for processing methods)
  2. Zoosanitary Certificate of Origin for countries that are free of HPAI and ND

10.13 Highly processed products

10.13.1 Legislative authority

Health of Animals Regulations

Part IV: Importations of Animal By-products, Animal Pathogens and other Things

  • 41(1) and (2), 41.1 (1) and (2) – Importation Prohibited
  • 51.2 (1)
  • 52(1) and (2) – Importation Permitted

10.13.2 Policy statement

Risk-based regulatory controls placed on the import of highly processed products are focused on preventing the introduction of animal diseases of concern into Canada. These commodities are as follows

  • Manufactured from ingredients of animal origin derived from mammals or birds
  • In final packaging or in bulk
  • Submitted to various, and usually multiple treatments, either chemical or physical
  • Commercially processed
  • Generally used in/for:
    • the food industry
    • cosmetics
    • industrial purposes
    • pharmaceuticals
    • laboratory purposes
    • fertilizer

10.13.3 Scope of commodities covered by this section

Note: This is not an exhaustive list.

  • Albumin (including bovine serum albumin)
  • Amino acids
  • Animal glue
  • Bone charcoal
  • Bone oil
  • Chondroitin sulphate
  • Collagen, collagen casings
  • Dicalcium phosphate
  • Enzymes of animal origin (for example, rennet, phosphatase, peroxidase)
  • Fatty acid
  • Fibrin
  • Gelatin
  • Gelatin capsules
  • Glycerides
  • Glycerol
  • Glycolipids
  • Hormones of animal origin (for example, insulin, adrenocorticotropic hormone)
  • Lactic acid
  • Lactose
  • Lactulose
  • Oleostearin
  • Ossein
  • Peptides
  • Peptone
  • Phospholipids
  • Serum substitutes (for laboratory purposes)
  • Sorbitan esters
  • Tricalcium phosphate (bone ash)
  • Triglycerides
  • Vitamins containing ingredients of animal origin

Note: Nucleic acids such as DNA and RNA are covered in the Laboratory and Research Samples section of this policy.

10.13.4 Not within the scope of this section

  • Food safety or public health requirements (refer to Food Imports)
  • Premises licensing or approval
  • Packaging and labelling requirements
  • Export of highly processed animal products

10.13.5 Roles and responsibilities

Note: This is not an exhaustive list.

CFIA Food Import Export Division (FIED)

  • Determination of public health requirements for highly processed animal products intended for human consumption

CFIA Animal Import/Export Division

  • Evaluation of the veterinary infrastructure and animal disease status of an exporting country, prior to allowing any importation, in collaboration with CFIA's Science Branch Animal Health Risk Assessment (AHRA) Unit
  • Provision of animal health requirements for highly processed animal products

CFIA Animal Feed Division

  • Determination of requirements under the Feeds Act and Regulations for the import of animal feeds, including those containing highly processed animal products as ingredients

10.13.6 Additional import requirements

One or more of the following requirements may apply

  1. Labelling requirements

    The product may need to be clearly identified on the label as a "highly processed product" or as an "ingredient in finished product", and clearly identified for use in industrial or laboratory purposes.

    The label may require the cautionary statement "Do not feed to cattle, sheep, deer, or other ruminants."

  2. Importer's declaration

    A written declaration from the importer (dated, signed and linked to the shipment being imported) may be required indicating one or more of the following

    • The species of origin and end use of the product
    • That the product is not derived from bones of bovine origin
    • That the product does not contain any trace of protein or fat
    • That the end use of the product is not for human consumption
  3. Zoosanitary certificate

    A zoosanitary certificate may be required stating one or more of the following

    • Species
    • Part or substance taken from the animal or animals
    • Country of origin
    • That the country of origin is free of diseases of concern to Canada
    • That the products was not prepared using the following bovine tissues or any protein products from which they were derived: the skull – including the brain, trigeminal ganglia and eyes, the spinal cord and the vertebral column (excluding the vertebrae of the tail, the transverse processes of the thoracic and lumbar vertebrae, and the wings of the sacrum) – and the palatine tonsils from all bovine animals aged 30 months or older; and that the product was not prepared using the distal ileum from bovine animals of all ages
    • In the case of hides and skins from bovine animals aged 30 months or older and stunned using a penetrating device, that the face plates were removed, or trimmed of hide a minimum of 2.5 cm around the stun hole and a minimum of 2.5 cm around all parts of the face plate which were visibly contaminated with brain tissue or washed, scraped, vacuumed, or otherwise processed to remove visible brain materials
    • That the bones used to prepare the product were derived from bovine animals that were not subjected to a stunning process prior to slaughter, with a device injecting compressed air or gas into the cranial cavity, or to a pithing process, and were subjected to and passed ante-mortem and post-mortem inspection
  4. Treatments/processing methods

    One or more of the treatment/processing requirements listed in Annex 6 may need to be applied to the product.

  5. Shipping invoice

    • A shipping invoice that states
      • The names of the consignor and consignee
      • That the product contains prohibited material

10.14 Medicinal and natural health products

10.14.1 Legislative authority

Health of Animals Regulations

Part IV: Importation of Animal By-products, Animal Pathogens and other Things

  • 41 and 41.1 - Importation prohibited
  • 42.1 – Animal Glands and Organs
  • 107

Note: It is recommended to contact Health Canada to confirm whether they have any regulatory requirements on imported medicinal and natural health products. Please note that these items may not be sold or used for medicinal, natural health or pharmaceutical purposes in Canada unless they meet Health Canada's requirements for efficacy and safety. Contact information for Health Canada is outlined below

Natural Health Products Directorate

Health Canada

Health Products and Food Branch

Natural and Non-prescription Health Products Directorate

Submission Administration Unit

250 Lanark Avenue, A.L. 2002B

Ottawa, Ontario

K1A 0K9 (Canada Post delivery; including Xpresspost)

K1Z 1G4 (Courier service; excluding Xpresspost)

E-mail: NNHPD_DPSNSO@hc-sc.gc.ca.

The website for the Office of Natural Health Products may also serve as a source of information.

In the case of medicinal products which may be derived from potentially endangered species, it is recommended that the importer contact Environment and Climate Change Canada as outlined below

The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES)

c/o The Canadian Wildlife Service, Environment Canada

Environment and Climate Change Canada

Public Inquiries Centre

7th floor, Fontaine Building

200 Sacré-Coeur Boulevard

Gatineau QC K1A 0H3

telephone: 1-800-668-6767 (toll-free number) or 819-938-3860 (National Capital Region)

E-mail: ec.enviroinfo.ec@canada.ca

10.14.2 Scope of commodities covered by this section

Note: This is not an exhaustive list. If the commodities listed below are used for end-uses other than for medicinal or natural health, they may fall under other sections of this policy, or other CFIA programs.

  • Powdered deer horn
  • Sliced deer horn
  • Deer velvet
  • Dried deer tail glands
  • Dried deer embryo extract
  • Dried deer pizzles
  • Dried bladders
  • Dried penises
  • Ox gall (processed)
  • Dried deer or porcine tendons
  • Dried beef bones
  • Essence of chicken (pan lan she liquid)
  • Dried duck gizzard lining
  • Tiger bones
  • Dried goat placenta
  • Dried chicken feet
  • Shredded bones of various species
  • Shredded meat or "floss" of various species
  • Pork skins also called fish maws
  • Pork crackle (dry edible rendered pork skin)
  • Dried porcine gall bladders

10.14.3 Not within the scope of this section

  • Food safety or public health requirements
  • Packaging and labelling requirements
  • Export of medicinal and natural health products
  • Requirements under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) of Wild Fauna and Flora

Note: Exemptions may apply to the following commodities destined for human use

  • Commercially prepared, sterile, shelf stable ox gall (bile) and essence of chicken
  • Highly processed commercially prepared and packaged products (meaning capsules, tablets, vials for injections, liquids, ointments) containing animal material where no pieces of animal tissue can be visibly identified
  • Personal importation of 1 kg or less of powdered or sliced deer horn or deer velvet

10.14.4 Roles and responsibilities

Note: This is not an exhaustive list.

CFIA Animal Import/Export Division

  • Evaluation of the veterinary infrastructure and animal disease status of an exporting country, prior to allowing any importation, in collaboration with CFIA's Science Branch Animal Health Risk Assessment (AHRA) Unit
  • Provision of animal health requirements for medicinal and natural health products

CFIA Food Import Export Division (FIED)

  • Provision of public health requirements for medicinal and natural health products intended for human consumption

Note: It is recommended that the importer consult with Health Canada for any requirements they may have.

10.14.5 Additional import requirements

One or more of the following requirements may apply

  1. Proof of origin

    In the case of products originating from the USA, some products may be allowed entry into Canada with proof of origin that is considered acceptable to CBSA.

  2. Processing of raw animal glands and animals organs at an approved establishment in Canada

    Under section 42.1 (1) of the HAR, a person may import raw animal glands and animal organs into Canada from a country or a part of a country not referred to in section 41 if the glands and organs are transported under seal of an inspector directly from the place of entry to an establishment approved by the Minister for the purposes of processing.

  3. Zoosanitary certificate

    An original zoosanitary certificate signed by an official veterinarian of the government of the country of origin may be required certifying that the product originated from a country or zone designated by Canada as free from diseases of concern (for example, BSE and foot and mouth disease in the case of bovine products).

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