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Video series - Statement from Canada's Chief Veterinary Officer: Preventing African swine fever from entering Canada

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Part 1 - CVO statement: Preventing African swine fever from entering Canada

Part 1 - CVO statement - Transcript

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency corporate introduction plays. It shows images that represent the work of the Agency including a Petri dish, strawberries, a growing plant, a chicken and a maple leaf.

Text: CFIA – Safeguarding with Science

Dr. Jaspinder Komal, Chief Veterinary Officer for Canada, appears on screen

Hello, I am Dr. Jaspinder Komal, Chief Veterinary Officer for Canada.

In recent months the Canadian Food Inspection Agency has been closely monitoring the spread of African swine fever in China and certain parts of Europe. This serious disease is known to occur only in pigs and can have a major impact on Canada's swine industry. That is why we are being proactive and working collaboratively with industry and our international partners to reduce the risk of the disease entering North America.

I want to assure Canadians that African swine fever is not in Canada, has never been in Canada, and we are doing everything we can to reduce the risks of it being introduced to Canada.

I also want to assure Canadians that this disease is not harmful to humans. It is only affects swine, including pigs, hogs and boars, both and domestic.

The CFIA has strict regulatory import controls in place. These controls are designed to prevent the entry into Canada of animals and their products and by-products from countries where diseases of concern are known to occur, including African swine fever.

It is important to know everyone has a role to play in reducing the risks associated with animal diseases.

Part 2 - CVO statement: Increased vigilance and biosecurity

Part 2 - CVO statement: Increased Vigilance and Biosecurity - Transcript

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency corporate introduction plays. It shows images that represent the work of the Agency including a Petri dish, strawberries, a growing plant, a chicken and a maple leaf.

Text: CFIA – Safeguarding with Science

Text: Increased Vigilance and Biosecurity

Dr. Jaspinder Komal, Chief Veterinary Officer for Canada, appears on screen

On-farm biosecurity is critical to preventing animal diseases from developing and spreading.

One of the most common ways that African swine fever is spread from country to country is through people's actions. By this I referring famers feeding their pigs uncooked uncooked food scraps that are infected with the virus.

Although harmless to humans, in the rare event that an item of food has even a trace amount of the virus, it can infect pigs if fed to them.

It is for this reason that you should carefully source animals, products and byproducts, including feed and feed ingredients.

Also ensure to take the necessary precautions so your pigs do not come into contact with wild pigs, hogs, or boars since the wild pig population can also carry and spread the disease by coming into contact with domestic animals.

If you have recently travelled to a country where serious animal diseases exist, avoid any contact with animals for at least 14 days after returning to Canada. This includes contact with wildlife, farm animals and zoo animals.

Part 3 - CVO statement: Purchasing swine feed

Part 3 - CVO statement: Purchasing swine feed - Transcript

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency corporate introduction plays. It shows images that represent the work of the Agency including a Petri dish, strawberries, a growing plant, a chicken and a maple leaf.

Text: CFIA – Safeguarding with Science

Text: Purchasing swine feed

Dr. Jaspinder Komal, Chief Veterinary Officer for Canada, appears on screen

Producers are reminded that when procuring swine feed, including buying online, ensure it is purchased from a trusted source.

Considerations to reduce the risk of wild transmission through feed ingredients include country of origin, supplier selection and feed mills. Selecting feed ingredients from regional sources reduces the risk of introduction of foreign animal disease.

Ask your Feed Mills and Feed Ingredient Suppliers to select sources that are from countries free of foreign animal diseases when possible, or at minimum, are compliant with known quality assurance standardization.

Select Feed Mills that are part of the recognized biosecurity program and participate in the Animal Nutrition Association of Canada's FeedAssure Program and follow their National Biosecurity Guide.

Part 4 - CVO statement: Traveller awareness

Part 4 - CVO statement: Traveller awareness - Transcript

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency corporate introduction plays. It shows images that represent the work of the Agency including a Petri dish, strawberries, a growing plant, a chicken and a maple leaf.

Text: CFIA – Safeguarding with Science

Text: Traveller Awareness

Dr. Jaspinder Komal, Chief Veterinary Officer for Canada, appears on screen

Travellers are reminded to declare all animal and food products at the border to prevent the spread of disease and to take precautions when visiting farms and travelling from infected areas.

Never bring pork products back into Canada, regardless of whether they are fresh, frozen, processed or cooked.

Wash all clothing and footwear worn while travelling in other countries prior to re-entry into Canada.

If you visit a farm or animals, it is crucial that you declare your visit upon re-entry into Canada.

Part 5 - CVO statement: Proactive preparedness planning measures

Part 5 - CVO statement: Proactive preparedness planning measures - Transcript

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency corporate introduction plays. It shows images that represent the work of the Agency including a Petri dish, strawberries, a growing plant, a chicken and a maple leaf.

Text: CFIA – Safeguarding with Science

Text: Proactive Preparedness Planning Measures

Dr. Jaspinder Komal, Chief Veterinary Officer for Canada, appears on screen

The CFIA is taking a proactive and collaborative approach to preventing African swine fever from being introduced to Canada.

As part of its ongoing proactive measures, the CFIA has:

  • import restrictions and border control of products brought in by international travelers in place to minimize the chances of introducing the virus into Canada
  • it is assessing the imports conditions based on ongoing risk assessment of countries from which Canada imports food, feed or feed ingredients
  • working with industry experts to ensure adequate supports are in place for all aspects of a disease outbreak scenario
  • the CFIA is working with the European Union to monitor the situation in affected countries and updating import controls as needed
  • it is also establishing harmonized diagnostic testing for ASF with Australia, New Zealand, the US and Mexico
  • it is transferring testing technology to our network of laboratories to ensure we have sufficient capacity within Canada if needed
  • the CFIA is coordinating communications efforts with federal, provincial and international partners stakeholders, including Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA), Chief Veterinary Officers, industry and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)
  • it is encouraging enhanced biosecurity measures including recommendations for travelers, farmers and feed purchasers

The CFIA is committed to protecting the health and safety of Canadian livestock, and will continue to provide updates on the risks and preventative measures underway regarding the spread of African swine fever.

If you would like to know more about the CFIA's activities, or to learn how you can help prevent the introduction of African swine fever from being introduced into Canada, I encourage you to go to our website located at www.inspection.gc.ca.

Thank you.

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