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2018-19 – Departmental Plan

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Table of Contents

Minister's Message

Minister of Health
The Honourable Ginette Petitpas
Taylor, PC, MP Minister of Health

As the Minister of Health, I am pleased to present the 2018-19 Departmental Plan for the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA).

I know Canadians care deeply about the food they eat – where it comes from, how it's produced and its safety. Canada continues to be recognized as having one of the best food safety systems in the world, and the CFIA plays a key role in maintaining that global recognition. The CFIA has a broad mandate that encompasses food safety, animal health, plant protection and international market access. Still, the CFIA's main priority is preserving the health and safety of Canadians, and the Agency works 24/7 to fulfill that mandate.

In service to Canadians, the CFIA continues its collaborative work with Health Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, and other partners in government and industry, to achieve objectives important to CanadiansFootnote 1: including implementing food safety measures; managing food, animal and plant risks; responding to incidents and emergencies; and promoting the development of enhanced food safety and disease control systems.

The CFIA is continuously innovating to proactively position itself to address emerging food safety, animal health and plant health risks as well as rapid advances in technology, at home and abroad. The CFIA is committed to openness and transparency and engages with Canadians so the Agency can better respond to consumers.

The CFIA supports a healthy, and competitive, agriculture and agri-food industry through its capacity as a science-based regulator. The Agency monitors trends in the global marketplace and actively participates in the development of international science-based rules, standards, guidelines and policies. The Agency works on behalf of Canada's agriculture and agri-food sectors by helping to open or maintain access to markets – contributing to a healthy economy.

I am confident that the CFIA, with its thousands of dedicated employees working across Canada, is well positioned to deliver on Government of Canada priorities on behalf of all Canadians.

The Honourable Ginette Petitpas Taylor, PC, MP
Minister of Health

Plans at a glance

Our core responsibility is safe food and healthy plants and animals. Every day, CFIA professionals work to protect Canadians across the country and instill confidence in Canada's regulatory system for safe food and healthy plants and animals. Through our work, the environment is protected, Canadians have the food-related information they need to make informed choices, and Canadian businesses have access to competitive opportunities around the world. We make decisions based on risk and science, which allows us to adapt and respond quickly to a changing environment.

Last year, the CFIA advanced a number of ambitious priorities that align with our core responsibility. In 2018-19, we will continue to build on the considerable work done to date and support advancing our core responsibility's three departmental results of ensuring:

To do this, we will focus on advancing the following five strategic priorities and accompanying key initiatives:

Modern Regulatory Toolkit

  • We are modernizing our regulations and program designs. The objective is to move toward outcome-based regulations that focus on the required outcome that regulated parties must meet, while providing more flexibility on how they choose to achieve it. We will continue to advance key initiatives such as Safe Food for Canadians Regulations, Fertilizer Regulations, Health of Animal Regulations, food labelling modernization; and update traceability regulations.

Integrated Risk Management

  • We continue to gather risk intelligence in modern tools and from multiple sources to better and more effectively inform risk decisions. In 2018-19, we will further develop risk based approaches, such as the establishment-based risk assessment model and implement, with our partners, the plant and animal health strategy.

Consistent and Efficient Inspections

  • We will continue piloting approaches to the phased implementation of the standard and consistent inspection approach in food, also known as the integrated agency inspection model. The approach will apply globally recognized risk management concepts that are based on prevention.

Digital First Tools and Services

  • We are moving toward digital services as the first choice for businesses and consumers to obtain information and business services from the CFIA. This will improve access to service and information for businesses and the public, as well as enhance efficiency.

    We will build on existing online tools such as "My CFIA", which provides convenient and secure online access for requesting certain services such as licenses, permits, registrations and export certificates.

Global Leader

  • We will continue to maintain and promote our reputation as a global leader by working to influence international standards that strengthen food safety, plant and animal health, environmental outcomes, and support market access for the above Canadian inputs and products. We will pursue fairness in trade practices, enhance the use of technology and regulatory cooperation and continue our engagement in the negotiation of free trade agreements.

For more information on the CFIA's five strategic priorities, please visit "Responding to Today, Building for the Future".

For more information on the CFIA's plans, priorities and the planned results, see the "Planned results" section of this of this report.

Planned results: what we want to achieve this year and beyond

Core Responsibility: Safe Food and Healthy Plants and Animals

Description:

Protecting Canadians by safeguarding Canada's food system and the plant and animal resources on which we depend, and supporting the Canadian economy through the trade of Canadian goods.

Planning highlights

The CFIA is continually evolving to meet the challenges of a complex and ever changing environment that is influenced by factors such as globalization, technological and environmental change, and new and emerging diseases or pests.

Annually, our food, plant and animal programs plan and deliver on their associated day-to-day prevention and safety activities using innovative approaches. The programs advance priorities that improve how we deliver our business in the following areas:

We also play a key role internationally by supporting:

Departmental Result 1: Food sold in Canada is safe and accurately represented to Canadians

Canadians want to know that the food they eat is safe and that industry understands and follows the required rules to produce or import food that is safe and accurately labelled. Through the delivery of our programs, the CFIA mitigates risks to public health associated with potential hazards in the food supply system and manages food safety emergencies and incidents, including collaborating with federal and provincial food safety partners and industry.

The CFIA works diligently to make a difference for Canadians by:

Our plans in support of this result include:

Modern Regulatory Toolkit

Accurate food labelling is important as it ensures that products are not being misrepresented to Canadians. The label provides consumers with information that helps them make informed decisions about the food they purchase for themselves and their families. This includes:

Did you know?

Most food recalls in Canada are voluntary, meaning that they are initiated and carried out by the responsible company with oversight from the CFIA.

If a company is unable or refuses to voluntarily recall a product, a mandatory recall order for products that pose a health risk is issued by the Minister of Health.

The CFIA distributes public advisories to media on high-risk recalls and posts them to the CFIA web site. You can also view public advisories on www.foodsafety.gc.ca.

The food labelling modernization initiative aims to meet the needs of Canadians by developing a more modern and risk-based food labelling system. Based on what we heard from stakeholders, this initiative proposes to improve legibility of food labels and provide more useful information with respect to date marking, company contact information, origin of imported foods, and emphasized ingredients. The system will also include tools for building consumer awareness and for promoting compliance. Tools will also help better define roles and responsibilities for truthful and not misleading food labelling and will clarify industry accountabilities and CFIA oversight. Additionally, they will help encourage consumers to make informed choices in the marketplace.

The CFIA and Health Canada are working closely to integrate their labelling modernization activities and to align and coordinate engagement activities, proposals, consultations, and coming-into-force dates for these additional proposed regulatory changes.

In that light, the CFIA will continue drafting new labelling provisions, in collaboration with Health Canada. The provisions will be included in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations as part of a second phase for these regulations, as well in the Food and Drug Regulations. The plan is to publish the labelling amendments in Canada Gazette, Part IFootnote 2 and then proceed to Canada Gazette Part IIFootnote 2.

Integrated Risk Management

The Canadian Food Safety Information Network will strengthen the ability of food safety authorities to better anticipate, detect, and mitigate food safety hazards; to respond quickly and effectively to food safety events and minimize their impact on Canadians; and to demonstrate the effectiveness of Canada's food safety system to trade partners. In 2018-19, in collaboration with its federal, provincial and territorial partners, the CFIA will advance a plan for establishing a collaborative and systematic approach to environmental scanning and will develop a Canadian Food Safety Information Network food and hazard classification system. The CFIA will also continue to negotiate data sharing arrangements with provinces and territories; and enter into the implementation phase of the network, which will lead to the launching of a suite of web-based applications for use by the network's partners.

Consistent and Efficient Inspections

As of March 31, 2017, 48% of dairy, fish and fresh fruit and vegetable establishment inspections used this approach. In 2018-19, the CFIA expects to conduct 100% of dairy, fish, fresh fruit and vegetable establishment inspections using the single inspection model, while implementation will continue across other food sectors.

Digital First Tools and Services

Global Leader

The Foreign Verification Office conducts food safety verifications at foreign food facilities that make and export food products to Canada, thus identifying and seeking to prevent offshore food safety issues at the point of production. Foreign verification missions are designed based on existing risk intelligence, for instance, compliance data and recalls.

The Foreign Verifications Office works collaboratively with foreign food safety authorities to coordinate and implement its missions, as well as address its observations. While there are various internal and external factors that influence the Foreign Verification Office mission plan, in 2018-19, the office plans to undertake approximately four missions per quarter, with a focus on Europe and Asia, and possible expansion to South America.

Departmental Result 2: Plant and animal resources are protected from diseases and pests and are safe for Canadians and the environment

Canadians want the health of our animals, plants and forests safeguarded. To effectively and efficiently prevent and contain diseases and pests that affect plant and animal resource bases, the CFIA must keep pace with the rapid rate of technological advancements and scientific breakthroughs, while maintaining reliable and relevant services for clients. We are moving toward an outcome-based regulatory system to support the well-being of our plants and animals.

The CFIA aims to make a difference for Canadians by:

These activities prevent or minimize risks to the food supply, to human, animal or plant health, and to the environment. They also help instill confidence for our trading partners about the safety of our food system and the health of our plants and animals.

Our plans in support of this result include:

Modern Regulatory Toolkit

Integrated Risk Management

Did you know?

To protect our health, as well as Canada's animals, plants, and natural habitats, every traveller entering Canada must declare all food, plants, animals and related products they are bringing into Canada.

Digital First Tools and Services

Global Leader

Did you know?

In 2018-19, the CFIA will start rebuilding the Sidney, British Columbia laboratory, which will be a model for partnerships in plant health. This new, world-class plant health research, biocontainment and greenhouse facility is being built to support Canada's agriculture and agri-food sector.

While many high containment animal health institutions exist world-wide, work was previously done in isolation. Combining these global resources will allow for a better understanding of disease transmission, improved risk assessment, the development and application of new knowledge for improved situational awareness, and better management of high-consequence bio-risks of concern. In 2018-19, the CFIA will continue to host the secretariat and management function of this international network, and will deliver on global research and training objectives for level 4 parties.

Departmental Result 3: Canadian food, plants and animals and their associated products can be traded internationally

When our trading partners have confidence in the safety of our food and the health of our animals and plants and their associated products, Canadian businesses are competitive and our economy benefits. The Government of Canada has placed a strong emphasis on enhancing and expanding an internationally competitive agriculture and agri-food sector. The CFIA supports government trade priorities and makes a difference for Canadians and Canadian businesses by:

These activities make it easier for foreign countries to buy Canadian food, and animals and plants and their products and for the destination country to accept exports when they arrive.

Our plans in support of this result include:

International standard setting

Global Leader

Did you know?

Taking reasonable steps to keep containers and their cargo clean helps to prevent the spread of invasive pests through commerce and facilitates the movement of containers through North American ports, leading to:

  • reduced port-of-entry inspections
  • faster cargo release, and
  • fewer unexpected expenses, such as demurrage charges due to cargo holds or costs associated with a container quarantined, tarped and treated, cleaned, or re-exported back to origin.
Market access support

Did you know?

CFIA works with international partners on a daily basis to enable international trade which then supports the Canadian economy.

When foreign countries and companies view Canada as a leader in safe food production, it promotes our businesses to stay competitive in the global marketplace.

International regulatory cooperation and collaboration

Innovation to support Safe Food and Healthy Plants and Animals

As a science-based regulator, the CFIA recognizes the need to continually test assumptions and experiment with new and novel approaches to existing and new problems. While this approach forms part of the core culture of our scientific functions, it will be important to extend that approach and culture into the program design and delivery areas.

To that end the CFIA has recently made effort by establishing the Innovation, Business and Service Development Branch. One of the branch's responsibilities will be to provide leadership and resources to the Agency for innovation. The branch will support consultation, and foster partnerships, with stakeholders, experts and organizations, to support high quality, ethical innovation.

Digital First Tools and Services

The CFIA is currently in the process of engaging with staff and stakeholders to identify new ideas and novel approaches to experiment with over the coming years in a new, nimble way. One of the approaches is focused on expediting the adoption of the digital platform. The concept is to use experimental "sprints" that are highly-focused projects that use collaborative multi-disciplinary problem solving skills in order to increase adoption rates for the Agency's digital services platform and the technological enablement of Agency inspection services. The following Sprints are currently underway:

The Enrolment and Permissions Sprint:

The Export Sprint:

The Inspection Sprint:

Consistent and Efficient Inspections

In addition, the following experimental initiatives are underway:

Compliance verification frequency and resource allocation: proof of concept

The CFIA wants to ensure that its resources are optimally aligned to maximize our impact and keep Canadians healthy.

Meat hygiene inspection (compliance verification system improvements)

By taking a closer look at the compliance verification system in meat, the CFIA will better understand where to dedicate inspection efforts and enhance our ability to mitigate risks to food safety at the establishment level.

Modernized slaughter inspection – hog

The pilot for the modernized slaughter inspection program in hogs began in February 2018 in two establishments. A central element in moving this pilot forward is high engagement with staff, unions, academia and industry. Guided by a number of performance indicators, we will take away learning that will help us understand streamlined approaches from a food safety perspective as well as Agency's responsibility from an inspection oversight role.

Gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) and the CFIA

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency is committed to ensuring gender impacts are meaningfully incorporated in its decision-making. As part of this commitment, the CFIA regularly considers the factors in gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) when administering its food safety, animal and plant health programs and services.

For example as part of its consumer protection role, gender-based analysis plus implications are taken into account for labelling requirements. As a science and risk-based regulator, the CFIA also identifies risks to potentially vulnerable populations to incorporate mitigating measures into its programs and services.

In addition, the CFIA supports Health Canada and the Public Health Agency assessments of gender-based analysis plus considerations when mitigating human health risks associated with specific foods in specific populations such as children, elderly and pregnant women. With our Health Portfolio partners, the CFIA will continue to promote gender-based analysis plus awareness and ensure application of gender-based analysis as it develops and administers its programs and services.

For more information on Gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) and the CFIA, see the "Supplementary Information" section of this report.

Planned Results Table
Departmental Results Departmental Result Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2014-15 Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results
Food sold in Canada is safe and accurately represented to Canadians. Percentage of food businesses that comply with federal rules. 95% March 31, 2019 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
Percentage of Public Warnings for high risk food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decision 95% March 31, 2019 100% 100% 100%
Plant and animal resources are protected from diseases and pests and are safe for Canadians and the environment. Number of harmful foreign plant pests that have entered and established themselves in Canada. 0 March 31, 2019 0 0 1
Percentage of domestic seed, fertilizer, and new or modified plant varieties and products that comply with Canadian regulations and international agreements 95% March 31, 2019 98% 96.16% 93.2%
Percentage of inspected loads of live animals that comply with federal humane transportation requirements. 95% March 31, 2019 98% 98.34% 98.53%
Number of cases of animal diseases that affect human and/or animal health that have entered into Canada. 0 March 31, 2019 0 0 0
Canadian food, plants and animals and their associated products can be traded internationally. Number of shipments of Canadian goods that are rejected at foreign borders because they do not meet their import requirements. To be established March 31, 2019 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018–19
Main Estimates
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
2020–21
Planned spending
571,740,385 571,740,385 512,414,764 512,522,100
Human resources (full-time equivalents - FTEs)
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents
2020–21
Planned full-time equivalents
5,043 4,625 4,625

The CFIA's core responsibility planned spending and planned full-time equivalents (FTEs) enable the delivery of the Agency's mandate. The decrease in planned spending and FTEs from 2018-19 to 2020-21 is mainly due to the expiration of temporary funding related to various initiatives and projects. The Agency will assess initiatives that are sunsetting and seek renewal, as required, to maintain and continuously improve Canada's strong food safety system, safe and accessible food supply, and plant and animal resource base.

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Planning highlights

The CFIA will continue its focus on supporting its employees and achieving its departmental results to strengthen its core responsibility so as to serve Canadians in the most effective and efficient manner possible. Our plans for 2018-19 include:

Human Resources

Build on Service Delivery

Enhancing Project Management

Enhancing Open and Transparent Government

Human resources (full-time equivalents - FTEs)
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents
2020–21
Planned full-time equivalents
901 894 894

Spending and human resources

Planned spending

Budgetary planning summary for Core Responsibility and Internal Services (dollars)
Core Responsibilities and Internal Services 2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Expenditures 2017–18 Forecast spending 2018–19
Main Estimates
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
2020–21
Planned spending
Safe food and healthy plants and animals 629,515,886 652,479,905 647,300,000 571,740,385 571,740,385 512,414,764 512,522,100
Subtotal 629,515,886 652,479,905 647,300,000 571,740,385 571,740,385 512,414,764 512,522,100
Internal Services 119,846,641 133,431,955 130,400,000 127,384,141 127,384,141 126,301,772 126,301,772
Total 749,362,527 785,911,860 777,700,000 699,124,526 699,124,526 638,716,536 638,823,872

Planned human resources

Human resources planning summary for Core Responsibility and Internal Services (full-time equivalents)
Core Responsibilities and Internal Services 2015–16
Actual
2016–17
Actual
2017–18
Forecast
2018–19
Planned
2019–20
Planned
2020–21
Planned
Safe food and healthy plants and animals 5,124 5,185 5,209 5,043 4,625 4,625
Subtotal 5,124 5,185 5,209 5,043 4,625 4,625
Internal Services 777 916 909 901 894 894
Total 5,901 6,101 6,118 5,944 5,519 5,519

Departmental spending trend graph

Departmental spending trend graph. Description follows.
Description for image: Departmental spending trend graph

This bar graph illustrates the Agency's actual spending for fiscal years 2015-16 and 2016-17 and planned spending for fiscal years 2017-18, 2018-19, 2019-20 and 2020-21. Financial figures are presented in dollars along the y axis, increasing by $100 million and ending at $900 million. These are graphed against fiscal years 2015-16 to 2020-21 on the x axis. On a secondary y axis, the actual and planned FTEs have been plotted.

For each fiscal year, amounts for the Agency's program expenditures and statutory vote are identified.

In 2015-16, actual spending was $154.2 million for statutory items, $595.1 million for program expenditures for a total of $749.4 million.

In 2016-17, actual spending was $161.5 million for statutory items and $624.4 million for program expenditures for a total of $785.9 million.

Planned spending for statutory items goes from $130.4 million in 2017-18, to $137.7 million in 2018-19, to $132.8 million in 2019-20 and to $132.8 million in 2020-21.

Planned spending for program expenditures goes from $647.3 million in 2017-18, to $561.4 million in 2018-19, to $505.9 million in 2019-20 and to 506.0 million in 2020-21.

Total planned spending goes from $777.7 million in 2017-18, to $699.1 million in 2018-19, to $638.7 million in 2019-20 and to 638.8 million in 2020-21.

For the Full Time Equivalent (FTE), it goes from 5,901 in 2015-16, to 6,101 in 2016-17, to 6,118 in 2017-18, to 5,944 in 2018-19, to 5,519 in 2019-20 and to 5,519 in 2020-21.

The CFIA's actual spending and full-time equivalents (FTEs) increased in 2016-17 mainly due to an increase in temporary resources for: the federal infrastructure initiative; the digital service delivery platform initiative; the Improved food safety for Canadians initiative; and statutory payments made to compensate Canadians for plants or animals ordered destroyed for the purpose of disease control. In addition, the Agency realigned existing resources and FTEs from its programs to Internal Services to comply with the April 2016 amendment to the Treasury Board requirements for classifying Internal Services activities.

In 2017-18, the Agency is forecasting expenditures that are slightly lower than 2016-17. This is due to a reduction in the forecast for statutory compensation payments made to Canadians to compensate them for animals or plants ordered destroyed for the purpose of disease control, partially offset by the anticipated ratification of some collective agreements and the resulting one-time retroactive salary disbursements.

In 2018-19, planned spending and FTEs decrease compared to the previous year's forecast primarily due to: one-time pay disbursements related to the anticipated ratification of collective agreements in 2017-18 and the sunsetting of funding for various initiatives and projects.

Further decreases in planned spending are anticipated in 2019-20 and 2020-21 largely due to the sunsetting of various initiatives and projects.

When including anticipated renewal of sunsetting resources, Agency spending and FTE utilization is forecasted to be more stable.

Estimates by vote

For information on the CFIA's organizational appropriations, consult the 2018–19 Main Estimates.

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations

The Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations provides a general overview of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's operations. The forecast of financial information on expenses and revenues is prepared on an accrual accounting basis to strengthen accountability and to improve transparency and financial management.

Because the Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations is prepared on an accrual accounting basis, and the forecast and planned spending amounts presented in other sections of the Departmental Plan are prepared on an expenditure basis, amounts may differ.

A more detailed Future-Oriented Statement of Operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net cost of operations to the requested authorities, are available on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's website.

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations
for the year ended March 31, 2019 (dollars)
Financial information 2017–18 Forecast results 2018–19 Planned results Difference (2018–19 Planned results minus 2017–18 Forecast results)
Total expenses 853,798,000 813,335,000 (40,463,000)
Total revenues 54,736,000 52,201,000 (2,535,000)
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 799,062,000 761,134,000 (37,928,000)

The forecast results for fiscal year 2017-18 and planned results for fiscal year 2018-19 slightly differ. The difference noted in the expenses is mainly explained by the anticipated ratification of one of the expired collective agreements for fiscal year 2017-18; the statutory authority compensation payments between both years; and the sunsetting of funding for various initiatives and projects.

Supplementary information

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Appropriate minister: The Honourable Ginette Petitpas Taylor, PC, MP

Institutional head: Paul Glover

Ministerial portfolio: Health

Enabling instrument(s):

CFIA Wide

Food Safety

Plant and Animal Health

Plant

Animal Health

Year of Incorporation / Commencement: 1997

Raison d'être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

Raison d'être

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is a large science-based regulatory agency with employees working across Canada in the National Capital Region and in four operational regions: Atlantic, Quebec, Ontario and Western Canada.

The CFIA works to ensure that food sold in Canada is safe and accurately represented to Canadians; that plant and animal resources are protected from diseases and pests, and are safe for Canadians and the environment; and that Canadian food, plants and animals and their associated products can be traded internationally. The CFIA strives to provide information needed by Canadians to make informed choices, and by Canadian businesses to have access to competitive opportunities around the world.

Mandate and role

CFIA's Key Federal Partners

  • Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
  • Canada Border Services Agency
  • Canadian Grain Commission
  • Environment and Climate Change Canada, including the Canadian Wildlife Service
  • Fisheries and Oceans Canada
  • Global Affairs Canada
  • Health Canada
  • Natural Resources Canada, including the Canadian Forest Service
  • Public Health Agency of Canada
  • Public Safety Canada

The CFIA develops program requirements, conducts laboratory testing, and delivers inspections and other services in order to:

The CFIA bases its activities on science, effective risk management, a commitment to service and efficiency, and collaboration with domestic and international organizations that share its objectives. The CFIA shares its responsibilities with various levels of government, with which it implements food safety, plant and animal health measures, and manages risks, incidents, and emergencies.

The CFIA administers and enforces 14 federal statutes, 34 sets of regulations, and several Ministerial Orders. Regulatory frameworks underpin the work of the Agency and are critical to support:

Operating context

At the CFIA, decisions are based on timely and relevant science that informs policy development, program design and program delivery. To keep pace with changing risks, so as to serve Canadians better and build for the future, the CFIA strives to streamline and improve its processes, advance its science, harness innovation and embrace technologies.

Our daily operations are driven by both external and internal influences and factors. The CFIA uses both prevention and responsive measures in managing these factors.

External Influences

External factors that influence the CFIA's operating environment include:

Internal Influences

Internal factors that influence the CFIA's operating environment include:

Managing Risk within a Complex Mandate

As the organization responsible for managing multiple risks to food safety, plant and animal health, market access and the environment, the CFIA proactively addresses risks using a number of risk control measures. As these risks change, the way the Agency responds has to change as well. The risks and their potential consequences can be reduced through the timely application of measures to control them.

The Agency has implemented an integrated risk management framework that helps us manage our many risks cohesively and consistently. The framework ties everything together and explains how information flows between the initiatives. Various initiatives have been developed to help the CFIA manage risks at different levels within the organization.

Description of this image follows.
Image description

Two circles. The first circle is for four corporate risks, which are human resource, information management and information technology, legal and reputational. The second circle is for four risks to the public interest, which are human health, economy, environment and animal welfare.

The risks that the CFIA manages can be divided into two broad categories:

Corporate Risks are uncertainties about the ability to achieve objectives that are faced by all organizations. Examples include human resource capacity, threats to the security of information management and information technology platforms, legal and reputational risks.

Risks To The Public Interest relate to the Agency's legislated mandate and include risks to human health, the economy, the environment, animal welfare, and the plant resource base.

There is a natural interaction between corporate risks and risks to the public interest. For example, responding to an increase in the rate and spread of a new animal disease or plant pest (risk to the public interest) could require additional training to support our responding resource base or if the CFIA was not prepared could pose a reputational threat (corporate risk).

The Agency has a corporate risk profile that puts a risk management process in place that systematically allows the Agency to understand its risks and mitigate them. At the time of preparing this report a great deal of work had been done to update the corporate risk profile, including reviewing best practices, internal engagement, workshops and training. The 2018-21 profile was making its way through approvals for implementation in April 2018. The progress of this updated corporate risk profile will be reported in the 2018-19 Departmental Results Report.

The CFIA has initiated a number of risk control measures that align risk mitigation strategies with financial resources, including:

Control Measures

Control measures are any actions or activities that can be used to prevent, manage or eliminate a hazard or mitigate a risk. This includes any process, policy, device, practice or other action that can modify risk, reduce risk or enable the reallocation of resources.

As outlined in the operating context section of this document, risks impacting CFIA are influenced by external factors such as trade and market access (increases in volume, variety and diversity of sources for trade), increased consumer knowledge and expectations, changing physical and social environment, advances in science and technology, and the alignment of policy goals with technological advances. Internal influences, such as more outcome-based approaches to food safety, plant and animal health, and an increased focus on the use of online tools to provide service will continue to modernize our processes, advance our science, and harness innovation to better serve Canadians and help us keep pace with the constantly advancing modern world.

Reporting framework

The CFIA's Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory of record for 2018–19 are shown below:

Description of this image follows.
Description of above image

The reporting framework is portrayed in a table divided in two sections. The first section is "Departmental Results Framework," under which lies CFIA's core responsibility: Safe food and healthy plants and animals. Under the core responsibility are three departmental results. Result 1: Food sold in Canada is safe and accurately represented to Canadians. This result has to indicators: the percentage of food businesses that comply with federal rules and the percentage of Public Warnings for high risk food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decision. Result 2: Plant and animal resources are protected from diseases and pets and are safe for Canadians and the environment. This result has four indicators: the number of harmful foreign pests that have entered and established themselves in Canada; the percentage of domestic seed, fertilizer, and new or modified plant varieties and products that comply with Canadian regulations and international agreements; the percentage of inspected loads of live animals that comply with federal humane transportation requirements; and, the number of cases of animal diseases that affect human and/or animal health that have entered into Canada. Result 3: Canadian food, plants and animals and their associated products can be traded internationally. This result has one indicator: the number of shipments of Canadian goods that are rejected at foreign borders because they do not meet their import requirements. All of the above is overseen by internal services.

The second section is "Program Inventory," under which the programs are listed as follow: Setting Rules for Food Safety and Consumer; Food Safety and Consumer Protection Compliance Promotion; Monitoring and Enforcement for Food Safety and Consumer Protection; Permissions for Food Products; Setting Rules for Plant Health; Plant Health Compliance Promotion; Monitoring and Enforcement for Plant Health; Permissions for Plant Products; Setting Rules for Animal Health; Animal Health Compliance Promotion; Monitoring and Enforcement for Animal Health; Permissions for Animal Products; International Standard Setting; International Regulatory Cooperation and Science Collaboration; and, International Market Access Support.

Concordance between the Departmental Results Framework and the Program Inventory, 2018–19, and the Program Alignment Architecture, 2017–18

Core Responsibility: Safe food and healthy plants and animals
2018–19 Core Responsibility and Program Inventory 2017–18 Lowest-level program of the Program Alignment Architecture Percentage of lowest-level Program Alignment Architecture program (dollars) corresponding to the program in the Program Inventory
Setting Rules for Food Safety and Consumer Protection 1.1.1 Meat and Poultry 8.9%
1.1.2 Egg 12.4%
1.1.3 Dairy 39.8%
1.1.4 Fish and Seafood 13.8%
1.1.5 Fresh Fruit and Vegetables 30.9%
1.1.6 Processed Products 23.5%
1.1.7 Imported and Manufactured Food Products 25.8%
Setting Rules for Animal Health 1.2.1 Terrestrial Animal Health 24.5%
1.2.2 Aquatic Animal Health 35.2%
1.2.3 Feed 34.3%
Setting Rules for Plant Health 1.3.1 Plant Protection 26.0%
1.3.2 Seed 34.8%
1.3.3 Fertilizer 51.5%
1.3.4 Intellectual Property Rights 59.5%
Food Safety and Consumer Protection Compliance Promotion 1.1.1 Meat and Poultry 1.9%
1.1.2 Egg 5.0%
1.1.3 Dairy 3.8%
1.1.4 Fish and Seafood 5.3%
1.1.5 Fresh Fruit and Vegetables 1.5%
1.1.6 Processed Products 4.0%
1.1.7 Imported and Manufactured Food Products 6.8%
Animal Health Compliance Promotion 1.2.1 Terrestrial Animal Health 6.2%
1.2.2 Aquatic Animal Health 18.5%
1.2.3 Feed 3.3%
Plant Health Compliance Promotion 1.3.1 Plant Protection 3.5%
1.3.2 Seed 4.9%
1.3.3 Fertilizer 5.9%
1.3.4 Intellectual Property Rights 37.4%
Monitoring and Enforcement for Food Safety and Consumer Protection 1.1.1 Meat and Poultry 79.2%
1.1.2 Egg 64.5%
1.1.3 Dairy 49.9%
1.1.4 Fish and Seafood 59.5%
1.1.5 Fresh Fruit and Vegetables 59.7%
1.1.6 Processed Products 65.0%
1.1.7 Imported and Manufactured Food Products 61.0%
Monitoring and Enforcement for Animal Health 1.2.1 Terrestrial Animal Health 56.8%
1.2.2 Aquatic Animal Health 20.9%
1.2.3 Feed 44.2%
Monitoring and Enforcement for Plant Health 1.3.1 Plant Protection 58.4%
1.3.2 Seed 32.8%
1.3.3 Fertilizer 20.7%
Permissions for Food Products 1.1.1 Meat and Poultry 7.9%
1.1.2 Egg 15.8%
1.1.3 Dairy 3.4%
1.1.4 Fish and Seafood 15.4%
1.1.5 Fresh Fruit and Vegetables 3.7%
1.1.6 Processed Products 3.7%
1.1.7 Imported and Manufactured Food Products 2.6%
1.4 International Collaboration and Technical Agreements 27.1%
Permissions for Animal Products 1.2.1 Terrestrial Animal Health 10.1%
1.2.2 Aquatic Animal Health 19.5%
1.2.3 Feed 17.8%
1.4 International Collaboration and Technical Agreements 26.4%
Permissions for Plant Products 1.3.1 Plant Protection 10.4%
1.3.2 Seed 26.9%
1.3.3 Fertilizer 21.6%
1.4 International Collaboration and Technical Agreements 22.5%
International Regulatory Cooperation and Science Collaboration 1.1.1 Meat and Poultry 1.4%
1.1.2 Egg 1.5%
1.1.3 Dairy 1.6%
1.1.4 Fish and Seafood 1.9%
1.1.5 Fresh Fruit and Vegetables 2.4%
1.1.6 Processed Products 1.4%
1.1.7 Imported and Manufactured Food Products 0.5%
1.2.1 Terrestrial Animal Health 1.6%
1.2.2 Aquatic Animal Health 2.2%
1.2.3 Feed 0.2%
1.3.1 Plant Protection 0.2%
1.3.2 Seed 0.3%
1.3.3 Fertilizer 0.1%
1.3.4 Intellectual Property Rights 2.9%
1.4 International Collaboration and Technical Agreements 9.4%
International Standard Setting 1.1.1 Meat and Poultry 0.2%
1.1.2 Egg 0.3%
1.1.3 Dairy 0.6%
1.1.4 Fish and Seafood 1.9%
1.1.5 Fresh Fruit and Vegetables 0.7%
1.1.6 Processed Products 1.0%
1.1.7 Imported and Manufactured Food Products 1.1%
1.2.1 Terrestrial Animal Health 0.3%
1.2.2 Aquatic Animal Health 2.1%
1.2.3 Feed 0.1%
1.3.1 Plant Protection 0.3%
1.3.2 Seed 0.2%
1.3.3 Fertilizer 0.1%
1.4 International Collaboration and Technical Agreements 7.8%
Market Access Support 1.1.1 Meat and Poultry 0.4%
1.1.2 Egg 0.4%
1.1.3 Dairy 0.8%
1.1.4 Fish and Seafood 2.4%
1.1.5 Fresh Fruit and Vegetables 1.0%
1.1.6 Processed Products 1.5%
1.1.7 Imported and Manufactured Food Products 2.2%
1.2.1 Terrestrial Animal Health 0.4%
1.2.2 Aquatic Animal Health 1.7%
1.2.3 Feed 0.1%
1.3.1 Plant Protection 1.3%
1.3.2 Seed 0.2%
1.3.4 Intellectual Property Rights 0.2%
1.4 International Collaboration and Technical Agreements 6.8%

Supporting information on the Program Inventory

Supporting information on planned expenditures, human resources, and results related to the CFIA's Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Supplementary information tables

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

The CFIA's Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy has remained unchanged since it was tabled in October 2017 and can be found on the CFIA's website.

Details on transfer payment programs of $5 million or more

General information

Name of transfer payment program: Compensation payments in accordance with requirements established by Regulations under the Health of Animals Act and the Plant Protection Act, and authorized pursuant to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act (S.C., 1997, c.6) - Statutory
Start date: 1997-98
End date: Ongoing
Type of transfer payment: Compensation payment
Type of appropriation: Statutory
Fiscal year for terms and conditions: 1997-98
Link to department's Program Inventory: Monitoring and Enforcement for Plant Health Monitoring and Enforcement for Animal Health
Description: Compensate Canadians, in accordance with the appropriate regulations, for plants or animals ordered destroyed for the purpose of disease control.
Expected results: N/A
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation: N/A
Decision following the results of last evaluation: N/A
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation: N/A
General targeted recipient groups: Canadians who have had animals and/or plants ordered destroyed for the purpose of disease control.
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients: N/A

Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017-18 Forecast spending 2018-19 Planned spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2020–21 Planned spending
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions - - - -
Total other types of transfer payments 4,560,701 12,500,000 12,500,000 12,500,000
Total program 4,560,701 12,500,000 12,500,000 12,500,000

Disclosure of transfer payment programs under $5 million

General information

Name of transfer payment program: Federal Assistance Program
End date: Ongoing
Type of transfer payment: Contribution
Type of appropriation: Voted appropriation – annually through Estimates
Link to department's Program Inventory: Safe Food and Healthy Plants and Animals
Main objective: The federal assistance program supports projects and initiatives that advance the CFIA's strategic outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.
Planned spending in 2018–19: $819,000
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation: 2016-17
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation (if applicable): 2020-21
General targeted recipient groups: Eligible recipients include those whose goals and objectives are complementary to and supportive of the CFIA's mission and strategic outcome. This includes individuals, groups of individuals, agriculture and commodity organizations and conservation districts.

Name of transfer payment program: Innovative Solutions Canada
End date: 2021-22
Type of transfer payment: Grant
Type of appropriation: Voted appropriation – annually through Estimates
Link to department's Program Inventory: Safe Food and Healthy Plants and Animals
Main objective: The Innovative Solutions Canada program supports the generation of new and unique intellectual property (IP), stimulation of research and development collaborations, and growth of small businesses in the Canadian innovation ecosystem.
Planned spending in 2018–19: $650,000
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation: N/A
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation (if applicable): To be determined
General targeted recipient groups: Canadian small businesses

Gender-based analysis plus (GBA+)

General information
Governance

The CFIA's Gender-based analysis plus implementation plan uses the six key elements outlined by Status of Women Canada for the successful integration of a Gender-based analysis plus Framework. These elements will support the systematic use of Gender-based analysis plus across the Agency, and provide a foundation for staff to develop competencies and apply Gender-based analysis plus to their decision-making processes. The CFIA will continue to monitor, review and update guides and tools as needed, to ensure that staff are appropriately supported in applying Gender-based analysis plus.

Prior to submitting Cabinet documents for approval, proposals will be reviewed by the CFIA's Gender-based analysis plus focal point to ensure comprehensiveness of Gender-based analysis plus. The Gender-based analysis plus focal point will monitor and track all Cabinet documents to ensure that Gender-based analysis plus is being integrated appropriately, specifically by analyzing the percentage of submissions that include gender and diversity considerations and supporting evidence, as opposed to submissions with neutral statements.

As signatory to the Health Portfolio's Sex and Gender-Based Analysis Policy, the CFIA will strive to ensure that all research, legislation, policies, programs and services will apply Gender-based analysis plus accordingly moving forward.

Human Resources The CFIA plans to have one full-time employee as the Gender-based analysis plus focal point that will lead Gender-based analysis plus implementation at the Agency in 2018-19.
Planned Initiatives

The CFIA will apply Gender-based analysis plus to all initiatives and proposals included in Cabinet documents. The CFIA will continue to monitor the inclusion of Gender-based analysis plus in Cabinet documents using a tracking spreadsheet, and will review Gender-based analysis plus attestation checklists and appendices for completeness.

The CFIA, in collaboration with the Health Portfolio and the Centre for Intercultural Learning, will develop case studies for policy and regulatory staff to guide them in applying Gender-based analysis plus to their policy and regulatory development. The CFIA will implement mandatory Gender-based analysis plus training for relevant employees, in the form of a Status of Women Canada's free online course. The training will be part of the onboarding courses at the CFIA so that employees understand how to apply Gender-based analysis plus in various fields, such as research, legislation, policies, programs and services. The CFIA will continue to collaborate with the Health Portfolio to share best practices and lessons learned, and move towards a streamlined approach to monitoring and reporting.

Horizontal initiatives

Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Renewal
General information
Lead department(s) CFIA
Federal partner organization(s) Health Canada; Public Health Agency of Canada
Non-federal and non-governmental partner(s) Not Applicable
Start date of the horizontal initiative 2014-15 Renewal Core bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) program (program regularly renewed since inception in 2003)
End date of the horizontal initiative 2018-19
Description of the horizontal initiative

To protect human and animal health, the BSE program conducts surveillance, research and risk assessments on BSE and other transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. This effort also minimizes the risk of exposure to infected materials, maintains consumer confidence through assessment of the effectiveness of the risk mitigation, and ensures measures are in place to control any potential outbreaks. The BSE program supports market access for cattle, beef and related products by promoting and explaining Canada's BSE program to domestic and international stakeholders.

Health Canada conducts research and risk assessments on human exposure to BSE and other transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. The Public Health Agency of Canada carries out surveillance of human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies and targeted supporting research in this area. The CFIA does the following:

  • researches and assesses the risk of animal exposure to BSE;
  • enforces the removal of specified risk material from the animal feed and the human food chains;
  • monitors products entering and leaving Canada for adherence to Canadian standards or the standards of the importing country;
  • monitors for the prevalence of BSE in the cattle population (through surveillance);
  • verifies that measures to control potential outbreaks are in place; and
  • explains Canada's BSE control measures to domestic and international stakeholders - for example, through the veterinarians abroad program - to maintain confidence in Canada's BSE program.
Governance structures The CFIA is the federal lead for BSE program delivery. A summative evaluation of the CFIA's BSE program conducted in 2008 recommended the governance of the program be strengthened to enhance coordination and communication of BSE-related activities, both internally and with partner organizations. Based on that recommendation and consistent with governance models for related horizontal initiatives, the CFIA launched a new committee structure to bring the Agency's governance approach in line with evolving business needs in 2015. The new governance structure enhances whole-of-Agency information sharing and integration. It also ensures a more efficient and streamlined senior-level committee structure. It is expected that the renewed structure will foster a better approach to decision making and will support day-to-day operations across the Agency. To ensure that business line perspectives are integrated into decision-making process, three executive-level committees on animal health, plant and food safety are supported.
Total federal funding allocated (start to end date) (dollars) 203,229,461 Total federal funding allocated (2014-15 to 2018-19)
Total federal planned spending to March 31st, 2017 (dollars) 121,757,377 Total federal planned spending to March 31, 2017
Total federal actual spending to March 31st, 2017 (dollars) 112,312,353 Total federal actual spending to March 31, 2017
Date of last renewal of the horizontal initiative 2014-15
Total federal funding allocated at the last renewal and source of funding (dollars) 203,229,461 (Budget 2014)
Additional federal funding received after the last renewal (dollars) Not applicable
Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation 2018-2019
Expected results information
Shared outcome of federal partners Performance indicators Targets Expected outcome of non-federal and non-governmental partners

To contribute to the protection of human and animal health, which supports domestic and international market access for Canadian beef and beef products.

ER 1: Specified risk material removal from the human food chain.

PI 1: Industry compliance rate for removal of specified risk material. T 1: 100% compliance. Not applicable

Products imported into Canada meet Canadian standards.

ER 2: Import controls.

PI 2.1: Percentage of import policies verified and updated as required.

PI 2.2: BSE import policy is verified and updated as required.

T 2.1: 25% per year.

T 2.2: Annually, when the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) updates the BSE risk status country lists.

Not applicable

Safe animals and food and market access

ER 3: BSE surveillance.

PI 3: Temporal trend in exposure to the BSE agent in the cattle population. T 3: Testing 30,000 samples from the high-risk category of cattle is the minimum national target. Not applicable
  • Governments and other entities make informed decisions to manage animal and related human health issues;
  • Risk to Canadian livestock resource base are mitigated; and
  • Canadian livestock sector is compliant with regulations.

ER 4: Cattle identification.

PI 4.1: Number and development status of inspection tools in place.

PI 4.2: Number of inspectors trained.

PI 4.3: Ratio of non-compliances versus number of compliance verification system tasks carried out by CFIA staff expressed as a percentage.

PI 4.4: Percentage of responses to disease and epidemiological investigations that are completed within service standards.

T 4.1: Training, tools and materials are relevant and up-to-date.

T 4.2: All inspectors verifying compliance are trained.

T 4.3: 95% compliance.

T 4.4: 100%

Not applicable

Bovine products exported from Canada meet requirements imposed by foreign countries.

ER 5: Export certification.

PI 5: Percentage of exports meeting the standards of the importing country as required. T 5: 100% Not applicable

Maintain or improve confidence in Canada's animal production and food system, promoting access to domestic and international markets.

ER 6: Technical market access support.

Immediate Outcome: Increased expertise and knowledge of BSE/transmissible spongiform encephalopathies science, risks and product surveillance.

PI 6: Market demand for Canadian bovines and beef products; consumer confidence in beef in Canada as tracked by media. T 6: An ongoing record (trend) of markets that are opened/expanded/maintained, and exports of Canadian beef and cattle; media tracking for consumer confidence in beef in Canada. Not applicable

ER 7: Health products risk assessment and targeted research.

PI 7.1: Number and type of training, conferences, symposiums, etc. attended by Health Canada staff on BSE / transmissible spongiform encephalopathies topics.

PI 7.2: Number of health risk assessments conducted as a result of BSE suspicion by product line (i.e. biologics).

PI 7.3: Number of products / product lots assessed for transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies / BSE risks).

T 7.1: 2

T 7.2: 0 (as needed)

T 7.3: 400 lots per year

Not applicable

ER 8: Food safety and nutrition: risk assessment

Outcome: Risks of human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in Canada remain clearly defined and well controlled.

PI 8.1: Number and type of training, conferences, symposiums, etc. attended by Health Canada staff on BSE / transmissible spongiform encephalopathies topics.

PI 8.2: Number of health risk assessments conducted as a result of BSE suspicion by product line (i.e. food products).

PI 8.3: Number of knowledge transfer activities related to BSE / transmissible spongiform encephalopathies.

T 8.1: 1 conference

T 8.2: 0

T 8.3: 2

Not applicable

ER 9: Prion diseases program

PI 9: Alignment of Public Health Agency of Canada data from surveillance of human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies with international benchmarks; the number of research presentations and publications; use of policy advice in decision-making.

T 9.1: Maintenance of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease surveillance sensitivity at a level where observed mortality from all human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in Canada is consistent with that observed internationally (i.e. 1 to 2 per million population).

T 9.2: Technological development to ensure Canadian diagnostic analyses remain consistent with those performed internationally.

T 9.3: At least 2 research presentations, publications or reports per year.

Not applicable
Name of theme Not applicable.
Theme outcome Not applicable.
Theme performance indicator(s) Not applicable.
Theme target(s) Not applicable.
Planning highlights For 2018-19, the key plans and priorities from a horizontal perspective are to continue to deliver the BSE Program by managing and monitoring BSE-related risks to current standards, as well as to continue to improve communication and coordination (for example, governance), performance measurement and reporting, and financial tracking.
Contact information

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Dr. Jaspinder Komal
Executive Director and Acting Chief Veterinary Officer
Animal Health Directorate
Policy & Programs Branch
613-773-7472

Public Health Agency of Canada
Steven Sternthal
Director General
Centre for Food-borne, Environmental and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases
Infectious Disease Prevention and Control Branch
613-948-6883

Health Canada
Etienne Ouimette
Director General
Resource Management & Operations Directorate
Health Products and Food Branch
613-957-6690

Planning information

For 2018-19, the key plans and priorities from a horizontal perspective are to continue to deliver the BSE Program by managing and monitoring BSE-related risks to current standards as well as to continue to improve communication and coordination (for example, governance), performance measurement and reporting, and financial tracking.

Planning summary
Federal organizations Link to department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activities Total allocation (2014-15 to 2018-19) (dollars) 2018–19 Planned spending (dollars) 2018-19 Expected results 2018-19 Performance indicators 2018-19 Targets Date to achieve target
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Animal Health and Zoonotics Program/ Food Safety Program/ International Collaboration and Technical Agreements / Internal Services Specified risk material removal from the human food chain 45,946,160 9,189,232 ER 1 PI 1 T 1 March 31, 2019
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Animal Health and Zoonotics Program/ Food Safety Program/ International Collaboration and Technical Agreements / Internal Services Import Controls 3,347,815 669,563 ER 2 PI 2.1
PI 2.2
T 2.1
T 2.2
March 31, 2019
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Animal Health and Zoonotics Program/ Food Safety Program/ International Collaboration and Technical Agreements / Internal Services BSE Surveillance 80,912,125 16,182,425 ER 3 PI 3 T3 March 31, 2019
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Animal Health and Zoonotics Program/ Food Safety Program/ International Collaboration and Technical Agreements / Internal Services Cattle Identification 10,672,140 2,134,428 ER 4 PI 4.1
PI 4.2
PI 4.3
PI 4.4
T 4.1
T 4.2
T 4.3
T 4.4
March 31, 2019
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Animal Health and Zoonotics Program/ Food Safety Program/ International Collaboration and Technical Agreements / Internal Services Export Certification 29,822,860 5,964,572 ER 5 PI 5 T 5 March 31, 2019
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Animal Health and Zoonotics Program/ Food Safety Program/ International Collaboration and Technical Agreements / Internal Services Technical Market Access Support 22,794,635 4,558,927 ER 6 PI 6 T 6 March 31, 2019
Health Canada Biologics and radiopharmaceutical Drugs Risk Assessment 1,538,882 306,881 ER 7 PI 7.1
PI 7.2
PI 7.3
T 7.1
T 7.2
T 7.3
March 31, 2019
Health Canada Food Safety and Nutrition Risk Assessment and standard setting 4,194,844 930,014 ER 8 PI 8.1
PI 8.2
PI 8.3
T 8.1
T 8.2
T 8.3
March 31, 2019
Public Health Agency of Canada Public Health Surveillance and Assessment Prion Diseases Program 4,000,000 800,000 ER 9 PI 9 T 9.1
T 9.2
T 9.3
March 31, 2019
Total for all federal organizations Not applicable Not applicable 203,229,461 40,736,042 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable

ER 1:

Expected Result: Specified risk material removal from the human food chain.

PI 1:

Performance Indicator: Industry compliance rate for removal of specified risk material.

T 1:

Target: 100% compliance.

ER 2:

Expected Result: Import controls.

PI 2.1:

Performance Indicator: Percentage of import policies verified and updated as required.

PI 2.2:

Performance Indicator: BSE import policy is verified and updated as required.

T 2.1:

Target: 25% per year.

T 2.2:

Target: Annually, when the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) updates the BSE risk status country lists.

ER 3:

Expected Result: BSE surveillance.

PI 3:

Performance Indicator: Temporal trend in exposure to the BSE agent in the cattle population.

T 3:

Target: Testing 30,000 samples from the high-risk category of cattle is the minimum national target.

ER 4:

Expected Result: Cattle identification.

PI 4.1:

Performance Indicator: Number and development status of inspection tools in place.

PI 4.2:

Performance Indicator: Number of inspectors trained.

PI 4.3:

Performance Indicator: Ratio of non-compliances versus number of compliance verification system tasks carried out by CFIA staff expressed as a percentage.

PI 4.4:

Performance Indicator: Percentage of responses to disease and epidemiological investigations that are completed within service standards.

T 4.1:

Target: Training, tools and materials are relevant and up-to-date.

T 4.2:

Target: All inspectors verifying compliance are trained.

T 4.3:

Target: 95% compliance.

T 4.4:

Target: 100%

ER 5:

Expected Result: Export certification.

PI 5:

Performance Indicator: Percentage of exports meeting the standards of the importing country as required.

T 5:

Target: 100%

ER 6:

Expected Result: Technical market access support.

PI 6:

Performance Indicator: Trends in market demand for Canadian bovines and beef products; media tracking for consumer confidence in beef in Canada.

T 6:

Target: Trends in market demand for Canadian bovines and beef products; media tracking for consumer confidence in beef in Canada.

ER 7:

Expected Result: Health products risk assessment and targeted research

PI 7.1:

Performance Indicator: Number and type of training, conferences, symposiums, etc. attended by Health Canada staff on BSE/transmissible spongiform encephalopathies topics.

PI 7.2:

Performance Indicator: Number of health risk assessments conducted as a result of BSE suspicion by product line (i.e. biologics).

PI 7.3:

Performance Indicator: Number of products / product lots assessed for transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies / BSE risks).

T 7.1:

Target: 2

T 7.2:

Target: 0 (as needed)

T 7.3:

Target: 400 lots per year

ER 8:

Expected Result: Food safety and nutrition: risk assessment.

PI 8.1:

Performance Indicator: Number and type of training, conferences, symposiums, etc. attended by Health Canada staff on BSE/transmissible spongiform encephalopathies topics.

PI 8.2:

Performance Indicator: Number of health risk assessments conducted as a result of BSE suspicion by product line (i.e. food products).

PI 8.3:

Performance Indicator: Number of knowledge transfer activities related to BSE/transmissible spongiform encephalopathies.

T 8.1:

Target: 1 conference

T 8.2:

Target: 0

T 8.3:

Target: 2

ER 9:

Expected Result: Prion diseases program.

PI 9:

Performance Indicator: Alignment of Public Health Agency of Canada data from surveillance of human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies with international benchmarks; the number of research presentations and publications; use of policy advice in decision-making.

T 9.1:

Target: Maintenance of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease surveillance sensitivity at a level where observed mortality from all human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in Canada is consistent with that observed internationally, that is, 1 to 2 per million population.

T 9.2:

Target: Technological development to ensure Canadian diagnostic analyses remain consistent with those performed internationally.

T 9.3:

Target: At least 2 research presentations, publications or reports per year.

Canadian Food Safety Information Network
General information
Lead department(s) CFIA
Federal partner organization(s) CFIA and Health Canada
Non federal and non governmental partner(s) Not applicable
Start date of the horizontal initiative 2014-15
End date of the horizontal initiative 2018-19
Description of the horizontal initiative

The Canadian Food Safety Information Network will respond to recommendations from the Report of the Independent Investigator into the 2008 Listeriosis Outbreak [Weatherill Report; recommendations 33 and 34]. The initiative will strengthen the ability of Canada's federal, provincial and territorial food safety authorities to share data and information to anticipate, detect and respond to foodborne risks and minimize the impact of food safety events. The Canadian Food Safety Information Network complements the federal public service's modernization strategy, Blueprint 2020, in two of its priority areas. The Canadian Food Safety Information Network contributes to Innovative Practices and Networking by sharing food safety data and information across federal, provincial and territorial jurisdictions. It also contributes to the Technology Priority of Blueprint 2020 by providing a web-based solution combining automated early warning with advanced data analysis for risk-based modelling and planning.

The Canadian Food Safety Information Network supports the Government of Canada's approach to evidence-based policy. Aggregated food safety data will increase the reliability of scientific evidence in risk-based decision-making to strengthen Canada's food safety system. Additionally, the Canadian Food Safety Information Network aligns with the Government of Canada's objective to improve relationships with federal, provincial and territorial partners. The initiative represents a pan-Canadian approach to food safety and requires that federal, provincial and territorial partners work collaboratively to achieve its goals.

Governance structures

The CFIA's Vice President, Science, is the Executive Sponsor for the implementation of the Canadian Food Safety Information Network.

A federal/provincial/territorial steering committee for the Canadian Food Safety Information Network has been established to provide integrated federal/provincial/territorial leadership, input and guidance for the development and implementation of the Canadian Food Safety Information Network program and associated food safety activities. A secretariat within the CFIA supports the steering committee.

The CFIA and Health Canada work horizontally in delivering their shared food safety mandates and meet regularly to discuss food safety issues of mutual concerns.

Total federal funding allocated (2014-15 to 2018-19) (dollars) 12,133,149 Table Note 5
Total federal planned spending to March 31, 2017 (dollars) 6,844,771
Total federal actual spending to March 31, 2017 (dollars) 6,061,287
Date of last renewal of the horizontal initiative April 2016
Total federal funding allocated at the last renewal and source of funding (dollars) 8,696,345 through Treasury Board funding
Additional federal funding received after the last renewal (dollars) Not Applicable
Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation 2018-19

Table Notes

Table Note 5

Previously reported as $15,606,877. Upon further clarification from Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat, the project component has been removed, as it is not considered part of the horizontal initiative.

Return to table note 5  referrer

Expected results information
Shared outcome of federal partners Performance indicators Targets Expected outcome of non-federal and non-governmental partners
ER 10: Build and maintain collaborative relationships among federal, provincial and territorial partners food safety, establishing a network for information on food safety through data support, coordination and outreach activities. PI 10: Collaborative partnerships are developed and maintained among federal, provincial and territorial authorities for food safety and data support materials are created. T 10: Pre-determined numbers of data support materials created and number of coordination and outreach activities taking place. Not Applicable
ER 11: An environmental scanning tool within Canadian Food Safety Information Network to better understand incidents, technological trends and emerging issues impacting the food supply. PI 11: Activities on developing an environmental scanning tool within Canadian Food Safety Information Network. T 11: Gather information from federal, provincial and territorial partners with regards to current practices. Not Applicable
ER 12: Improved ability of government agencies and industry to anticipate, prepare and respond to food safety issues and emergencies through data support, coordination and outreach with authorities on food safety. PI 12: Data uploaded on the Canadian Laboratory Information Network and training sessions held with Health Canada's research and regulatory community. T 12: Pre-determined number of training activities and food laboratory research results uploaded on the Canadian Laboratory Information Network. Not Applicable
Name of theme 1A Data Support, Coordination and Outreach
Theme 1A outcome Data support, coordination and outreach: The CFIA continued outreach activities with federal, provincial and territorial partners, including work on formalizing provincial/territorial participation in the Canadian Food Safety Information Network through bilateral data sharing arrangements. Additionally, engagement with Canadian Food Safety Information Network partnered laboratories continued and included activities associated with quality management and accreditation of laboratories. To develop a detailed list of business requirements, extensive consultations took place among the program team for Canadian Food Safety Information Network, CFIA business experts, and federal, provincial and territorial partners. The CFIA, with its partners, developed a common food safety data dictionary, and identified the data elements to be shared, and continued the development of a common system for food and hazard classification.
Theme 1A performance indicator(s)
  • Data sharing arrangements signed between CFIA and federal, provincial and territorial partners to formalize their participation in the network;
  • A report containing the business requirements gathered and listed by functionality and priority level;
  • An approved data dictionary by the federal, provincial and territorial steering committee for the Canadian Food Safety Information Network, in addition to the identification of a system for food and hazard classification;
  • The number of multi-jurisdictional planning meetings that occur; and
  • The number of members that have participated in pilots and additional working groups.
Theme 1A target(s)
  • Five data sharing arrangements signed between CFIA and the federal, provincial and territorial partners;
  • One business requirement document;
  • One approved data dictionary;
  • Two semi-annual face-to-face meetings and monthly teleconferences with the federal, provincial and territorial steering committee for the Canadian Food Safety Information Network to maintain awareness, outreach and coordination among partners and to seek concurrence on the development of Canadian Food Safety Information Network; and
  • One member per jurisdiction to participate in a pilot.
Name of theme 1B Environmental Scanning
Theme 1B outcome Advancing coordinated environmental scanning activities to better understand incidents, technological trends, and emerging issues that could affect the safety of Canada's food supply through the development of a community in support of environmental scanning activities.
Theme 1B performance indicator(s)
  • Engagement with provincial/territorial partners to gather details of how other departments conduct environmental scanning activities for departmental resources, sources of information as well as end products to further aid in developing the Canadian Food Safety Information Network functionality; and
  • The number of analysts from Canadian Food Safety Information Network partners identified to provide environmental scanning capacity through environmental scanning tools.
Theme 1B target(s)
  • An inventory of environmental scanning and intelligence data; and
  • At least one analyst is identified from each participating federal, provincial and territorial food safety authorities.
Planning highlights

The Canadian Food Safety Information Network will enter its Implementation phase in 2018-19, which includes launching the technical infrastructure required to share food safety data and undertaking operational readiness activities to ensure its successful uptake by federal, provincial and territorial partners. Further advancement of the activities conducted in 2017-18 will take place in 2018-19 to ensure a successful deployment of the technical infrastructure that is designed to support program activities of the Canadian Food Safety Information Network.

In 2018-19, the Canadian Food Safety Information Network planning highlights include:

  • continue to negotiate data sharing arrangements with provinces and territories;
  • continue to engage the federal/provincial/territorial partners that include the federal/provincial/territorial Steering Committee and subject matter experts;
  • develop a Canadian Food Safety Information Network food and hazard classification system; and
  • advance a plan for establishing a collaborative and systematic approach to environmental scanning.
Contact information

Canadian Food Inspection Agency:

Christiane Villemure
Executive Director, Canadian Food Safety Information Network,
Science Branch
Telephone: 613-773-5811

Health Canada:

Karen McIntyre
Director General
Food Directorate
Health Products and Food Branch
Telephone: 613-957-1821

Planning summary
Federal organizations Link to department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activities Contributing programs and activities Total federal allocation (2014-15 to 2018-19) (dollars) 2018–19 Planned spending (dollars) 2018–19 Expected results 2018–19 Performance indicators 2018–19 Targets Date to achieve target
Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) Food Safety Program Data Support, Coordination and Outreach 9,330,455 2,208,982 ER 10 PI 10 T 10 March 31, 2019
Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) Food Safety Program Environmental Scanning 990,306 235,227 ER 11 PI 11 T 11 March 31, 2019
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Internal Services Data support, coordination and outreach 571,532 133,710 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Internal Services Environmental scanning 70,059 15,911 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
Health Canada Food Safety and Nurtrition Data Support, Coordination, and Outreach 1,170,797 263,423 ER 12 PI 12 T 12 March 31, 2019
Total for all federal organizations       12,133,149 2,857,253        

ER 10: Expected Result:

Data support, coordination and outreach: The CFIA continued outreach activities with federal, provincial and territorial partners, including work on formalizing provincial/territorial participation in the Canadian Food Safety Information Network through bilateral data sharing arrangements. Additionally, engagement with Canadian Food Safety Information Network partnered laboratories continued and included activities associated with quality management and accreditation of laboratories. To develop a detailed list of business requirements, extensive consultations took place among the program team for Canadian Food Safety Information Network, CFIA business experts, and federal, provincial and territorial partners. The CFIA, with its partners, developed a common food safety data dictionary, and identified the data elements to be shared, and continued the development of a common system for food and hazard classification.

PI 10: Performance Indicators:

T 10: Targets:

ER 11: Expected Result:

Environment Scanning: Advancing coordinated environmental scanning activities to better understand incidents, technological trends, and emerging issues that could affect the safety of Canada's food supply through the development of a community in support of environmental scanning activities.

PI 11: Performance Indicators:

T 11: Targets:

ER 12: Expected Result:

PI 12: Performance Indicator:

T 12: Targets:

Horizontal Initiative – Close-Out Reports

Listeriosis Horizontal Initiative Close-Out Report

Name of the horizontal initiative: Renewal of Government Response and Action Plan to the 2008 Listeriosis Outbreak

Start date: 2009-10

End date: 2016-17, with end date for CFIA 2015-16

Lead department: CFIA # of times renewed: One (2012)

Partner departments: Health Canada, Public Health Agency of Canada

Other non-federal partners: nil

Expenditures (millions):

Total federal funding from start to end date (Authorities and Actual): $75.0 million from 2009-10 to 2011-12.

$112.9 million (2012-13 to 2016-17) and $10.5 million ongoing (Health Canada and Public Health Agency of Canada).

Themes and Internal Services
Theme and Internal Services Authorities
(as per the Treasury Board Secretariat submission – based on 2012 renewal)
Actual Spending Variance(s)
Address Immediate Food Safety Risks (to prevent) $65,908,404 $54,249,136 $11,659,268
Enhance Surveillance and Early Detection (to detect) $24,654,580 $26,071,164 ($1,416,584)
Improve Government Response to Foodborne Illness Outbreaks (to respond) $22,337,016 $17,111,229 $5,225,787
Totals $112,900,000 $97,431,529 $15,468,471

Results:

Addressed immediate food safety risks by hiring and training new ready-to-eat meat inspection staff, updating food safety programs and directions to industry, built 24-hours-per-day / 7-days-per-week capacity for health risk assessments, and improved electronic access for inspection staff.

Enhanced Surveillance and Early Detection were established by upgrading a web-based national public heath surveillance system, improving detection methods for Listeria, and enhancing laboratory testing capacity, and improving laboratory diagnostic tools.

Improved government response to food-borne illness outbreaks in Canada by strengthening federal leadership capacity for outbreak response, revising the national food-borne illness outbreak response protocol, improving risk communication during food-borne emergencies, targeting communications to vulnerable populations, and improving public access to integrated Government of Canada food safety information.

Performance indicators Trend data
  1. Addressed Immediate Food Safety Risks through:
  • (1.1) Hiring ready-to-eat meat inspection staff;
  • (1.1) The CFIA hired and maintained an expanded workforce of 70 full-time inspectors.
  • (1.2) Scientific and technical training programs for inspection staff;
  • (1.2) The CFIA developed a new national training plan for meat processing plant inspectors that has been reviewed and evaluated on an annual basis. Total sessions of scientific and technical training have steadily decreased from a high of 18 sessions (2770 person days) in 2012-13 to 8 (840 person days) in 2015-16 as new and incumbent inspectors were trained and courses were integrated to reduce duplication.
  • (1.3) Technical support to continue enhanced connectivity for inspectors;
  • (1.3) Following a pilot phase, the CFIA began deploying wireless devices to inspectors in 2011-12. The number of inspectors with high speed aircard access increased from 477 in 2012-13 to 850 in 2015-16.
  • (1.4) Enhancing food safety program risk management; and
  • (1.4) The CFIA continued to modernize food safety standards, programs, policies and operational procedures to make them consistent and reflect current trends. This entailed reviewing, validating, and/or updating current standards/programs/policies/procedures in a number of areas within its food safety and inspection programs. Examples include guidance documents such as the meat hygiene manual of procedures, updates of the meat hygiene E. coli control policy to provide better guidance on high event periods, and amendments to the Listeria policy. The creation and deployment of the guidance document repository supported the introduction of the Single Food Program and provided a consolidated suite of current standards/programs/policies/procedures in a number of areas within its food safety and inspection programs.
  • (1.5) Capacity for the increasing number and complexity of Health Risk Assessments (HRA).
  • (1.5) Health Canada increased its capacity through hiring and dedicating additional full-time employees to health risk assessment activities. It also trained and cross-trained more staff to conduct risk assessments, and enhanced the procedures used to support the CFIA during its food safety investigations. This included establishing a 24/7 contact for the CFIA to conduct after-hours HRAs. Guidelines such as the Current Standards Operation Procedure in the health risk assessment process has been continually reviewed and updated. Total HRAs conducted annually ranged from 279 to 391 from 2012-13 to 2016-17. All health risk assessments have been conducted within established service standards (less than 8 hours for the highest risk category of assessments).
  • (1.5) Health Canada continued to lead the food safety health risk assessment consortium to create better partnerships between federal, provincial and territorial departments/agencies responsible for food safety and enhances the capacity for each of its members to respond to food safety and risk assessment issues.
  1. Enhanced Surveillance and Early Detection through:
  • (2.1) Capacity to improve and validate test detection methods for Listeria and scientific capacity to continue additional Listeria testing;
  • (2.1) Due to the increased volume of samples tested through CFIA's Listeria monitoring program, the Agency started providing food microbiology laboratory services seven days per week as of 2009-10. As of 2015-16, product samples for Listeria testing have increased approximately threefold.
  • (2.2) Developed and improved test detection methods for Listeria and other foodborne hazards;
  • (2.2) In 2010-11, the CFIA began validating rapid detection methods for Listeria in meat products and in the meat processing environment to reduce the time required to test samples and enable more rapid response during food safety investigations. As of 2015-16, the Environmental Monitoring Program for Listeria in ready-to-eat meat establishments purchased and supplied inspectors with environmental test kits, which have since tested over 1000 environmental samples per year.
  • (2.2) In 2010-11, Health Canada developed an enhanced method for isolation of Listeria (results in 3-5 days instead of the former 7-10 days). Since then, Health Canada has significantly advanced the development and validation of analytical methods for the detection of Listeria and other hazards in foods through improved test detection methods and other laboratory diagnostic tools.
  • (2.3) Expanded National public health surveillance tools and platforms through FoodNet Canada (formerly C-EnterNet) Program; and
  • (2.3) Since 2012, Public Health Agency of Canada's implementation of a pan-Canadian surveillance system through expansion of the FoodNet Canada program has progressed with sentinel sites being added in Ontario and Alberta in 2014, joining the BC site, which was established in 2010.
  • (2.4) Strengthened laboratory diagnostic and networking tools: continued implementation of whole genome sequencing; continued expansion of PulseNet Canada.
  • (2.4) Public Health Agency of Canada's PulseNet Program developed a comprehensive online training program, and expanded its training and certification programs to new and existing member laboratories to ensure that lab capacity exists across provincial and federal laboratories. The PulseNet Canada DNA fingerprinting method used to detect and confirm the emergence of food-borne outbreaks through laboratory data has been readily shared and jointly analyzed between PulseNet Canada members. Public Health Agency of Canada's National Microbiology Laboratory has continued to increase the sequencing of Listeria and E. coli genomes for the application of public health investigations.
  • (2.4) CFIA has developed the capacity, through its Pulse-Field Gel Electrophoresis Center, to routinely test and then report virtually immediately to the provincial and federal PulseNet Canada members when its laboratories isolate foodborne bacterial pathogens.
  1. Improved Government Response to Foodborne Illness Outbreaks in Canada through:
  • (3.1) Support to the Food Safety Portal;
  • (3.1) The Government of Canada launched the Food Safety Portal (www.foodsafety.gc.ca) in 2010 as an one-stop source of information about food safety and foodborne illness. In 2013-14, the portal had 2,025,517 views with 683,579 visits from 473,858 visitors and has had comparable web metrics in other years. The addition of social media accounts to further drive traffic back to the portal was subsequently added. By 2015-16, the CFIA's food safety Twitter account had 45,224 followers, with 1068 food safety tweets were issued during the year as well as 1229 food safety postings on Facebook. The CFIA migrated the information on the Food Safety Portal as part of the Web Renewal Initiative to Canada.ca in 2016.
  • (3.2) Developed risk communication and social marketing strategies;
  • (3.2) Public Health Agency of Canada developed a comprehensive risk communications strategy to guide how the Agency communicates to Canadians during a national foodborne illness outbreak. The strategy includes plans for communicating with the public and at-risk populations using a variety of traditional and innovative formats, including social media networks and the food safety portal, and audio-video webcasts by the Chief Public Health Officer of Canada. Public Health Agency of Canada also collaborated with Health Canada and CFIA to ensure that the Agency's information for Canadians during a national outbreak flows consistently from Health Canada's pre-outbreak food safety advice.
  • (3.2) In 2010-11, Health Canada launched an ongoing Safe Food Handling Social Marketing Strategy. Engagement focussed on three at-risk groups: older adults, pregnant women and those with compromised immune systems, to build awareness that they are at higher risk and communicate safe food handling practices. Educational resources were developed and made available in both printed and electronic formats and distributed to media, tweeted to 10,700+ followers and emailed to 200 stakeholders. Approximately 800,000 booklets and brochures had been distributed through target publications and partnerships. By comparison, 2016-17 activities have meant a decrease in the distribution of hard-copy materials, but an increase in online activities. For example, 184,436 Safe Food Handling Guides were distributed, but the increase in social media activities resulted in 1,028,515 views, 40,200 engagements (a tally of likes, comments, shares, reTweets, link clicks etc.) on Facebook, YouTube and Twitter. Additionally, a direct mail campaign to 210,000 Canadians over the age of 60 promoted the Canada.ca/FoodSafety web site, while an electronic advertising campaign targeting web banners, search engines and social media generated an additional 157,000 visits. Overall web traffic to the pages generated 1,340,028 page views, representing and 11.8% increase in views compared to 2015-16.
  • (3.3) Increased human illness outbreak response capacity; and
  • (3.3) Public Health Agency of Canada, in consultation with Health Canada and CFIA, developed an Incident Command Structure to improve coordination and capacity among food safety partners during food-borne illness outbreaks. Integration with CFIA's Emergency Management System is underway and will be assessed in 2010.
  • (3.3) Public Health Agency of Canada, in consultation with Health Canada and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency and with federal, provincial and territorial partners developed a food-borne illness emergency response plan for food-borne illness outbreaks requiring a response beyond the scope of the food-borne illness outbreak response protocol..
  • (3.3) Public Health Agency of Canada developed a web-enabled outbreak communications platform, Outbreak Central, which consists of a series of tools that will facilitate the coordination and sharing of information amongst federal, provincial and territorial food safety and public health partners during an outbreak investigation. This tool was used successfully in 2012-2013 by federal, provincial and territorial partners during outbreak investigations. Public Health Agency of Canada has also stabilized its epidemiological baseline capacity by hiring additional staff members for the purposes of outbreak detection and response.
  • (3.4) Strengthened national epidemiological surge public health outbreak capacity.
  • (3.4) Public Health Agency of Canada established a secretariat office to coordinate its surge capacity under the food-borne illness outbreak response protocol. The purpose of the office is to ensure that Public Health Agency of Canada is positioned to assign qualified individuals needed to effectively manage and respond to multi-jurisdictional outbreaks. The Agency has completed an ongoing skills survey of its staff to identify qualified individuals who could be assigned in these circumstances. Internal partners were also engaged to support the development and implementation of administrative models, training, protocols and procedures. A database/web application continues to be refined to support surge capacity requirements, additional skills and expertise to support outbreak response.
  • (3.4) In 2013, a mobilization unit within Public Health Agency of Canada was established and developed Advanced Food Safety Training to Agency field staff who are part of the Agency's federal surge response capacity. The training prepared participants to better respond to food-borne illness outbreaks and to public health issues arising at the animal-human interface.

Brief explanation of performance:

In 2008, the presence of Listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-eat meat caused a listeriosis outbreak, which resulted in the deaths of 23 Canadians. Immediately after the outbreak, both industry and government began to examine how they could work to prevent such an outbreak in the future, and to minimize harm when food contamination occurs. The Government of Canada requested an independent investigation into the circumstances of the outbreak and to make recommendations to strengthen the food safety system. In July 2009, the Report of the Independent Investigator into the 2008 Listeriosis Outbreak (the Weatherill Report) was submitted to the Government and publicly released.

The CFIA, Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada have acted on all 57 of the recommendations put forward in the Report of the Independent Investigator into the 2008 Listeriosis Outbreak. It has also kept Canadians informed on progress through a series of three interim reports posted on the Food Safety Portal. Organizations have carried out the Government's 2009 action plan with a sustained effort on critical areas such as human resources, scientific capacity and communications to strengthen the food safety system. These efforts have culminated in reducing food safety risks, enhancing surveillance and early detection, and improving emergency response.

Advances in scientific research and technology from 2009 to 2017 have meant that the CFIA, Health Canada and Public Health Agency of Canada have had to adapt and adjust plans and activities to keep pace with the scale of change and the increasing complexities that go with preventing, detecting and responding to foodborne illness and food safety in a globalized context. Trend data has shown that CFIA, Health Canada and Public Health Agency of Canada sustained activity levels following an initial period of capacity building (2009-11). The renewed funding in 2012 further allowed for refinement to various approaches in detecting and preventing Listeria, as well as in the way the government shares information and responds to stakeholders, partners and Canadians.

The Government has enhanced its overall performance and effectiveness in managing food safety risks, identifying new and emerging food safety issues, and responding to food safety events when they arise. There is heightened awareness of the significance of food safety, and its high priority, at all levels of government.

Key performance results achieved by CFIA, Health Canada, and Public Health Agency of Canada include clarified roles and responsibilities, enhanced coordination of oversight of food safety among federal partners and industry, and improved communication among federal partners, industry and the public on food safety issues. These achievements have led to improved management of risks associated with Listeria in RTE meats and better prevention of foodborne illnesses in Canada.

In October 2013, the CFIA joined Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada in reporting to the Minister of Health. This reorganization has further strengthened Canada's food safety system by bringing all three authorities responsible for food safety under one Minister. This ensures clear focus, easy collaboration and timely communications with Canadians in relation to food safety.

Programs receiving ongoing funding:

A. Internal audits
Program Ongoing funding Purpose
Health Canada (2014-15) $3.9 million To continue to enhance the Government of Canada's ability to prevent, detect and respond to outbreaks of foodborne illnesses, pursuant to recommendations stemming from reviews of the 2008 listeriosis outbreak.
Public Health Agency of Canada (2013-14) $6.6 million To continue to enhance the Government of Canada's ability to prevent, detect and respond to outbreaks of foodborne illnesses, pursuant to recommendations stemming from reviews of the 2008 listeriosis outbreak.
CFIATable Note 6 To continue to enhance the Government of Canada's ability to prevent, detect and respond to outbreaks of foodborne illnesses, pursuant to recommendations stemming from reviews of the 2008 listeriosis outbreak.
Total $10.5 million

Table Notes

Table note 6

Although the CFIA did not receive ongoing funding in the 2011-12 renewal, the Agency did receive temporary renewal for 2016-17 and ongoing funding in 2017-18. These are not considered part of the Horizontal Initiative.

Return to table note 6 referrer

Plans (including timelines) for evaluation and/or audit:

To support implementation of renewed funding, the CFIA, Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada have either developed or conducted evaluations of their respective activities independently, and will continue to work collaboratively to coordinate their activities. The evaluations were conducted in accordance with each Department and Agencies' five-year evaluation plan as prescribed in the Treasury Board Policy on Evaluation:

– In 2011, the CFIA produced several evaluation reports linked to Listeria and to the Independent Investigator recommendations:

  1. Lessons Learned: The Canadian Food Inspection Agency's Recall Response to the 2008 Listeriosis Outbreak
  2. Lessons Learned: The Canadian Food Inspection Agency's Review of Est. 97B (Maple Leaf Consumer Foods Inc.)

Both can be found at: Library and Archives Canada

– The CFIA evaluated its Listeria funding in 2015-17 under the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Evaluation of the Meat Programs. Overall, the evaluation found the Meat Programs are ensuring the safety of meat products to a very high degree—both products distributed in Canada and exported products. All components of the program were found to be effective. Possible improvements were identified in the delivery of Compliance Verification System inspection tasks, performance measurement, and training materials for slaughter inspectors. In particular, it was determined that a more risk-based approach to inspections would provide an opportunity to better target inspection resources to areas of highest risk.

– Health Canada's Listeriosis activities were reviewed as part of the Food Safety and Nutrition Quality Program and covered the period from 1999 to 2012. Health Canada' evaluation report was released in 2014-2015.

– The evaluation of the Public Health Agency of Canada's activities was conducted in 2017-18.

Additionally, all organizations have reported on the progress, performance and overall effectiveness of enhancements through the Parliamentary reporting process, using the Report on Plans and Priorities and the Departmental Performance Report.

The CFIA has developed management review action plans to address the findings from the above reports and implement improvements to: the CFIA's approach to consultations (development of a focal point to ensure consistency in consultation activities and an enhanced web presence); Memoranda of Understanding between the federal government, the provincial and territorial governments and the CFIA; and manuals and coordination for food safety investigations.

Food Safety Modernization Horizontal Initiative Close-Out Report

Name of horizontal initiative: Food Safety Modernization

Start date: April 1, 2011

End date: March 31, 2016

Lead department: CFIA # of times renewed: 0

Partner departments: Health Canada

Other non-federal partners: nil

Expenditures (millions):

Total federal funding from start to end date (Authorities and Actual): $91.4 millionFootnote 7

Themes and Internal Services
Themes and Internal Services Authorities
(as per the TB submission)
Actual Spending Variance(s)
Inspection System Modernization $51,847,305 $49,731,067 $2,116,238
Enhancing Laboratory Response Capacity $19,800,000 $17,376,461 $2,423,539
Improved Information Management and Information Technology $16,800,000 $12,251,075 $4,548,925
Enhancing Health Risk Assessment Capacity to Support CFIA Food Safety Inspection Activities $3,000,000 $2,581,841 $418,159
Totals $91,447,305 $81,940,444 $9,506,861

Results:

Performance indicator(s) and trend data for shared outcome(s):
Performance indicators Trend data

Inspection system modernization

The development and sequential implementation of an integrated Agency inspection model that will result in the improved management of food safety risks.

The main objectives of this modernization initiative were to move the CFIA away from a system of independent commodity-specific inspection approaches and inspector training, and paper-based record keeping and interactions with stakeholders, to that of a single-inspection approach consistent across the food safety program, supported by standardized training, technology information solutions, enhanced proactive science capacity, and improved service to stakeholders.

The CFIA finalized processes for the integrated Agency inspection model (formerly known as the improved inspection delivery model).

Project and expenditure approval was sought and was received for the information management and information technology enablement of the integrated Agency inspection model and the export certification process (the electronic service delivery platform [project]).

With respect to the implementation of Health Canada's Listeria policy for non-meat ready-to-eat food, the Agency will continue staffing actions to provide inspection staff for activities in high-risk areas, validate new laboratory methodologies for Listeria in non-meat commodities, and analyze additional food and environmental samples. CFIA subject matter experts will also provide refresher training to existing staff to keep inspectors current with emerging trends and developments related to their work.

The development of a single approach to food inspection that is consistent in its approaches to food safety risks and non-compliance issues.

The CFIA collaborated with the United States Food and Drug Administration and the International Food Protection Training Institute for the further development of the competency-based training frameworks for the Inspectorate, Advisory and Laboratory communities. These frameworks will form the basis for a career spanning learning path for CFIA employees.

Training on the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations, Compliance Verification using a Preventative Control Plan, an Introduction to Risk Culture at the CFIA and training to support the launch of the Standard Inspection Process was developed and delivered.

Enhancing laboratory response capacity

The CFIA is able to detect and respond faster to food safety hazards.

Highly skilled scientists were hired to respond to demands for food safety testing in targeted laboratories. These scientists conducted research projects to develop novel, more rapid and sensitive detection methods to enhance the Agency's response to food safety incidents.

Additionally, CFIA completed a collaborative research project with Genome Canada and Alberta Innovates on bio-solutions on Listeria monocytogenes genomics. A draft report was submitted to Genome Canada and Alberta Innovates.

CFIA has become a national and international leader in the field of food safety genomics. CFIA scientists are leading national and international research collaborations to expand the utility of genomics methodology to build emergency response capability to support food safety investigations, identify food bacterial isolates definitively, and establish international best practices for the analysis and interpretation of bioinformatic data.

To respond more efficiently to food-borne illnesses and outbreaks, the addition of modern equipment helped laboratories conduct more sensitive and rapid testing. Renovations to St. Hyacinthe and Greater Toronto Area laboratories allowed for more effective use of laboratory space for testing and analysis. These projects were completed on time and on budget.

The Modernizing Equipment and Laboratories projects at the Greater Toronto Area and St-Hyacinthe Food laboratories moved into the Project Implementation stage.

The development of a Laboratory Network Strategy for an integrated laboratory network was created to increase the ability of Canada's laboratories to detect and respond to food safety risks and hazards as well as to share the information across food safety authorities.

As part of the interrelated efforts to improve Canada's food safety, the CFIA worked with federal, provincial, and territorial food safety partners and established a Canadian Food Safety Information Network.

After the development of the Laboratory Network Strategy, CFIA obtained funds through additional tuberculosis submissions to build upon this strategy and to leverage an existing web-based electronic platform used for Canadian public health and animal health networks to allow real-time sharing of food safety information and laboratory data among federal, provincial, and territorial food safety authorities, The Canadian Food Safety Information Network program and project will enhance food safety surveillance and laboratory response capacity across Canada to allow federal, provincial, and territorial food safety partners to improve their collective ability to anticipate, detect, and respond to foodborne threats and hazards.

Improved information management and information technology

Information management and integration, information access to the front-line staff through increased connectivity and modernized applications.

The Agency made and continues to make investments in technological tools to support inspector mobility and productivity. 598 tablets were deployed and more devices continue to be deployed and/or replaced as they reach the end of their lifecycle.

The development of an information management and collaboration strategy, business intelligence roadmap, and information architecture strategy has continued to strengthen data governance process and business intelligence in the Agency. The deployment of operational and executive dashboards has resulted in improved information based decision making.

On the infrastructure side, the following activities were undertaken:

  • analysis and solution design against reference architectures to identify opportunities for consolidation, to reduce costs and duplication of effort, and to improve Information Management and Information Technology performance and service delivery;
  • improved processes and collaboration within and across business lines to inform the development and implementation of strategic Information Management and Information Technology capabilities that support business requirements;
  • Effective management of information management and information technology product lifecycles to ensure capabilities evolve over time and continue to reflect industry trends, partner organization dependencies, and business requirements;
  • Improved of information management and information technology architecture governance that is integrated with the overall Branch and Agency governance and investment processes, and formally incorporated into the enterprise project management framework; and
  • Strategic planning to ensure that information management and information technology investments align with the direction of CFIA, Shared Services Canada, and the Government of Canada.

In response to the Treasury Board Secretariat government-wide Application Portfolio Management strategy, the CFIA initiated the development of its own strategy for re-platforming several information management and information technology applications to more effectively support new and evolving business requirements. As a result, several of CFIA's applications were successfully migrated to modern technology platforms.

Enhancing health risk assessment capacity to support CFIA food safety inspection activities

Health Canada has strived and succeeded to address all health risk assessment requests within established service standards.

In addition, efforts to continuously improve are focused on:

Development and maintenance of standard operating procedures, report templates, work instructions and other health risk assessment resources to expedite delivery of health risk assessments and increase transparency in decision-making.

Technical training of scientific evaluators, and the cross-training of an additional full-time employee for after-hours health risk assessments.

  • Leadership of the food safety health risk assessment consortium to create better partnerships between federal, provincial and territorial departments/agencies responsible for food safety. The consortium enhances the capacity for each of its members to respond to food safety and risk assessment issues.

Brief explanation of performance:

The food safety modernization initiative supports government-wide and CFIA priorities and will enhance how CFIA carries out its activities. Project activities produced their intended outputs and were well aligned with overall project objectives.

Programs receiving ongoing funding:

Core elements of this initiative received on-going funding through Budget 2017.

Plans (including timelines) for evaluation and/or audit:

The CFIA conducted an evaluation that examined the initial $87.4 million allocated to the food safety modernization initiative between fiscal years 2011-12 and 2014-15. The report and Management Response and Action Plan were approved by the President of the CFIA in February 2017. The Management Response and Action Plan commitments were shown to be complete in a Management Response and Action Plan status update report given to the Performance Measurement and Evaluation Committee of the CFIA in November 2017.

More information on that evaluation can be found on the CFIA's website.

Planned evaluation coverage over the next five fiscal years

Planned evaluation coverage, 2018–19 to 2022–23
Program Last evaluation Evaluations planned in the next 5 years Fiscal year of approval 2018–19 Program spending covered by the planned evaluation (dollars) 2018–19 Program spending covered by all planned evaluations (dollars) 2018–19 Total program spending (dollars) Table Note 9 Rationale for not evaluating Program or spending
Food Safety and Consumer Protection Evaluation of the Meat Programs (2016-17) Evaluation of the Canadian Food Safety Information Network 2018-19 Not applicable Table Note 10 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
Food Safety and Consumer Protection Evaluation of the Meat Programs (2016-17) Evaluation of Food Fraud 2018-19 Not applicable Table Note 10 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
Food Safety and Consumer Protection Evaluation of the Meat Programs (2016-17) Evaluation of Food Quality Programming 2019-20 Not applicable Table Note 10 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
International Engagement and Market Access Support Not applicable Table Note 8 Evaluation of Market Access 2018-19 8,964,524 8,964,524 27,421,347 Planned spending refers to 2017/18 FY. It will be updated when possible
Animal Health Evaluation of the Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) Management Program (2014-15) Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable There is an evaluation currently underway
Plant Production and Resources Protection Evaluation of the Plant Protection Program (2014-15) Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable To be considered in future years
Internal Services Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Considered part of all other evaluations
Total Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable

Table Notes

Table Note 8

Market Access has been partially covered in past evaluations (Meat, Fresh Fruit and Vegetables) but has not been evaluated on its own.

Return to table note 8  referrer

Table Note 9

Funding information will be updated as it is made available

Return to table note 9  referrer

Table note 10

Funding is not currently tracked by the evaluation area, spreading over multiple program areas.

Return to first table note 10  referrer

Note: all references to program spending refer to planned spending for the 2018–19 fiscal year only and not cumulative spending over 5 years.

Upcoming internal audits for the coming fiscal year
Internal audits
Title of internal audit Area being audited Status Expected completion date
Audit of National Chemical Residue Monitoring Program Program Management Controls Completed December 2017
Audit of CFIA Inspector General Office Program Management Controls In Progress March 2018
Audit of Administration of CFIA Designations Program Management Controls CancelledTable Note 11 n/a
Joint Audit of Information Management and Information Technology Service Management (CFIA/AAFC) Information Management and Information Technology Controls CancelledTable Note 11 n/a
Audit of the Mandated Emergency Management Program Management Controls In Progress March 2018
Audit of Animal Pathogen Import Permit & Certification Process Program Management Controls Planned March 2019

Table Notes

Table note 11

Audits identified as "Planned" may be subject to change due to shifting of priorities based on annual evaluation of risk elements. The proposed audit projects for fiscal years 2018-2019 will be approved April 2018.

Return to table note 11  referrer

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures. This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

1400 Merivale Road,
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0Y9
Canada

Telephone: 1-800-442-2342 / 1-613-773-2342

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Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)

Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)

Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.

Core Responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)

An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a Core Responsibility are reflected in one or more related Departmental Results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.

Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)

A report on the plans and expected performance of appropriated departments over a three-year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.

Departmental Result (résultat ministériel)

Any change or changes that the department seeks to influence. A Departmental Result is often outside departments' immediate control, but it should be influenced by Program-level outcomes.

Departmental Result Indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)

A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a Departmental Result.

Departmental Results Framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)

The department's Core Responsibilities, Departmental Results and Departmental Result Indicators.

Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)

A report on the actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.

experimentation (expérimentation)

Activities that seek to explore, test and compare the effects and impacts of policies, interventions and approaches, to inform evidence-based decision-making, by learning what works and what does not.

full-time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)

A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

Gender-based Analysis Plus (GBA+) (analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS+])

An analytical process used to help identify the potential impacts of policies, programs and services on diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people. The "plus" acknowledges that GBA goes beyond sex and gender differences to consider multiple identity factors that intersect to make people who they are (such as race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability).

government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)

For the purpose of the 2018–19 Departmental Plan, government-wide priorities refers to those high-level themes outlining the government's agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government; A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada's Strength; and Security and Opportunity.

horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)

An initiative in which two or more federal organizations, through an approved funding agreement, work toward achieving clearly defined shared outcomes, and which has been designated (by Cabinet, a central agency, etc.) as a horizontal initiative for managing and reporting purposes.

non-budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)

Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

performance (rendement)

What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.

performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)

A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.

performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)

The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.

planned spending (dépenses prévues)

For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.

plan (plan)

The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.

priority (priorité)

A plan or project that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Departmental Results.

program (programme)

Individual or groups of services, activities or combinations thereof that are managed together within the department and focus on a specific set of outputs, outcomes or service levels.

Program Alignment Architecture (architecture d'alignement des programmes)Footnote 12

A structured inventory of an organization's programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.

result (résultat)

An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization's influence.

statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)

Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.

Strategic Outcome (résultat stratégique)

A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization's mandate, vision and core functions.

sunset program (programme temporisé)

A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.

target (cible)

A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.

voted expenditures (dépenses votées)

Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.

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