Quality System Procedure 142.1: Pedigreed Seed Crop Inspection Procedures - Appendices
Appendix IX: Travel Patterns for Crop Inspection

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The following diagrams are suggested patterns to be used as general guidelines. As each inspection must consist of a minimum of 6 representative counts in the crop, the inspector should divide the field into 6 equivalent areas and randomly take a count in each area. Patterns A and B are taken from the AOSCA Suggested Sampling Procedure For Inspecting Fields For Seed Certification. All examples are based on a hypothetical rectangular 40 hectare (100 acre) field.

Pattern A

Pattern A
This pattern covers seven-eights of the crop and requires the inspector step out of the pattern to reach the isolation or check the isolations when accessing the crop. The most remote part of the crop is sufficiently close to the inspector walking the pattern so that the pattern can be easily varied to examine any part of the crop that appears doubtful from a distance.

Pattern B

Pattern B
This pattern is a shorter travel pattern than pattern A that covers about one-half of the crop and requires the inspector step out of the pattern to reach the isolation or check the isolations when accessing the crop.

Pattern C

Pattern C
This pattern satisfactorily covers the inspection of the crop but not the isolation. The central area of the crop is covered twice while the outer edges of the middle are not approached. Using this pattern, the inspector must divert from the travel pattern to check the isolation and possibly to take counts as well.

Pattern D

Pattern D
This pattern adequately covers all areas of the crop including the isolation. However, this pattern is more time consuming. It may be useful for small fields, plots and crop requiring close scrutiny due to previously identified problems with the variety. If the inspector needs to exit the crop on the side of entry, the inspector may modify the pattern by the addition or deletion of one pass.

Pattern E

Pattern E
The diamond pattern is commonly used. It allows for verification of the isolation as well as the crop. The inspector may need to divert from the pattern in order to examine the central part of the crop if it appears doubtful from a distance.

Pattern F

Pattern F
This pattern may be used when two inspectors are available for simultaneous inspection or when the crop condition prohibits mobility in one corner of the crop.

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