PI-005: Chapter 8 Tuber Inspection Requirements

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Disclaimer:

In the present version of this chapter, contact information, references to specific organizations within the CFIA, and references to other documents or policies may not be current. This information will be updated at the time of the next revision of this chapter. Please contact the CFIA for any questions or further information.

8.1 Objective

A tuber inspection is performed on graded product to determine if the shipment meets the tuber size and grade standard established in Section 48, and 48.1 of Part II of the Seeds Regulations and any additional requirements outlined in export market agreements. This chapter explains inspection procedures for seed potato lots inspected by Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) inspectors. It should be used with PI-009: Seed Potato Tuber Inspection Manual which explains the process for identifying, scoring and recording defects and diseases to determine product acceptability.

8.2 Inspection Frequency

Potatoes are a perishable commodity and are subject to deterioration over time. It is therefore necessary to frequently monitor the condition of graded potatoes, bagged or bulk, to ensure that they meet the tuber standards set by the Seeds Regulations Part II.

8.2.1 Domestic Shipments

A minimum of one inspection per seed lot is required for the domestic shipment of seed potatoes. It is recommended that the inspection be carried out on the first load shipped from each lot. However, any inspections performed on a seed lot for export purposes counts as part of the minimum domestic requirements and additional inspections of seed in the same lot may not be required.

When a lot is shipped over several weeks or months, compliance visits or additional inspections are advisable. In cooperation with the grower, the inspector must make arrangements to coordinate inspection visits with shipments. Any grower having difficulty with the quality of seed potatoes in storage or after grading will be monitored at a higher frequency during grading operations.

8.2.2 U.S. Shipments

All seed potato shipments being exported from Canada to the United States (U.S.) for either recertification or commercial planting must be inspected.  Seed potato shipments for recertification must be inspected by a CFIA inspector, while shipments not intended for recertification as seed may be inspected by either a CFIA inspector, or shipped under the Seed Potato Quality Management Program Refer to the most recent memorandum for additional United States import requirements for potatoes from Canada.

8.2.3 International Shipments

All shipments are subject to inspection. Import requirements and tolerances may vary depending on the standard of the importing country. It is the responsibility of the grower/packer to meet the import requirements. For information on phytosanitary certification refer to section 8.7.

8.2.4 Pre-Grading Inspection for Special Markets

In special circumstances an inspector may be requested to pre-inspect tubers prior to grading a lot to ensure it is eligible for shipment to certain Canadian export markets. These markets can have strict tolerances for regulated non-quarantine diseases such as scab or rhizoctonia which require special attention. Take a random sample from each storage seed lot (minimum 200 tubers or as determined by export agreements). In order to comply with certain export market requirements it may be necessary to wash the samples before scoring defects. When required, wash the sample prior to inspection. Inspect the tubers as per the sample inspection procedure concentrating on the tolerances outlined in the export agreement. Determine the eligibility for that market. In some cases the market requirements are very strict and it may be difficult to meet the standards. Advise grower on the results of the inspection.

8.2.5 Pre-Clearance Program for Special Markets

For some export markets there are pre-clearance programs in which all the inspection activities for regulated non-quarantine pests are carried out at origin before a shipment leaves Canada. This may include field, harvest, storage and or grading inspections/audits carried out jointly by CFIA and foreign inspectors. If an inspector is involved in such activity they should be fully aware of the work plans and review the manuals related to the program prior to inspection.

8.3 Preparation for Tuber Inspection

  • The grower or shipper initiates the inspection process by contacting the local inspection office to request necessary documentation to accompany a shipment.
  • The inspector must review the domestic or export requirements for seed potatoes in order to determine lot eligibility for shipment. For export shipments, there may be special requirements that must be met prior to document issuance. The inspector must confirm all the necessary testing requirements have been met and the lot certification numbers, class issued, etc. must be confirmed. For phytosanitary inspection preparation please see Section 8.7.4.
  • When certification tags are requested, print and record the number of tags needed. When additional documents are required such as Seed Potato Tuber Inspection forms (CFIA/ACIA 3076) or a Record of Bulk Movement for Seed Potatoes (CFIA/ACIA 2343) they should be brought to the inspection site. When tags are issued at least one tag must be kept at the office with the initials of the inspector that issued the tag. The tag information should be reviewed by another inspector in order to be sure that tags have been issued properly.
  • Assemble required inspection materials i.e. knives, tuber sizers, scales, gloves, disinfectant, hand sprayers, thermometer, blank forms etc.
  • Wear appropriate clothing and disinfect boots, knife, sizers, sample containers such as wire baskets or buckets and scales to prevent contamination from previous inspection sites.

8.4 Pre-Inspection Procedures at Shipping Point (General)

When arriving at the shipping point an inspector should observe the general conditions of the operation. This will give the inspector an indication of most of the problems to anticipate in the actual tuber inspection. These preliminary observations of the lot can reveal potential tuber defects that may keep the lot from entering specific markets.

  • First observe and note general storage conditions:
    • If necessary use thermometer and take ambient temperature (too low may indicate risk of chilling injury);
    • Look for presence of frost or excessive dampness in the facility;
    • Odor may indicate a problem with rot in the pile;
    • General level of cleanliness of storage and equipment.
  • Accurately identify the lot that is being graded by variety and class, observe general conditions of the lot looking for wet or hot spots and excessive sprouting. These conditions are indicators of disease pathogen activity and sources of inoculums.
  • Observe the appearance of the tubers on the face of the pile. Special attention should be paid to tubers diseased with scab, rhizoctonia, soft rots, dry rots etc. In addition malformed tubers, foreign varieties and tubers damaged by frost or mechanical injury should also be identified. A sample could be inspected here to confirm gradeability of the lot.
  • Go to the grading area and observe tubers in cull bins. Most of the disease problems will be seen in the cull bin. At this point, it is advisable to cut a number of the diseased or misshapen tubers to observe internal defects and for disease identification.

8.5 Sampling

A sampling strategy is designed to ensure that a representative sample is obtained which directly reflects the total graded shipment. The ideal sample should be random, accurate and repeatable if required. It is advisable to check a sample at the start of grading of the lot to identify potential problems early.

8.5.1 Sampling Rates

A sample consists of a minimum of 1% of the total shipment unless otherwise stated in export agreements for specific markets. In the case of multiple shipments from one lot during the course of a consignment the sampling intensity may be reduced to 0.5% after the first load or subsequent loads, if they clearly meet the tolerances set out in the Seeds Regulations Part II. If the load is questionable it should be inspected at the 1% level or greater.

8.5.2 Tuber Sampling

Inspection requires detailed examination of a sample of tubers from graded bags and containers or equivalent quantity from a graded bulk load. Inspection of these samples should be done on a hand rack or grading table in a well-lit area. If the inspector determines that the lighting or facilities are inadequate, she/he should request improvements. If the grower does not comply, the inspector can refuse to do the inspection. Tubers which are cut during the course of an inspection should never be placed back into the shipment.

Depending on the type of shipment the following sampling methods are used:

8.5.2.1 Bulk Shipments

Determine the quantity to be shipped in consultation with the grower and calculate the sample weight at a 1% rate. For example, a trailer containing 40,000 lb. will require a total sample of 400 lb. It is preferred that the grower supply a container to obtain sub-samples, however, in some circumstances, the inspector may have to use his/her own. If this is the case, the inspector must ensure proper cleaning and disinfection of the container prior to and after using it. Once the sub-sample container (i.e. wire basket) has been filled, the contents should be weighed to determine the number of sub-samples needed to equal the total sample required.

Continuing with the above example, if the sub-sample basket holds 25 lb, a total of 16 sub-samples would be required (i.e. 400 lb/25 lb). Count the tubers in several of the 25 lb sub-samples to determine an average number of tubers/sub-sample in order to calculate percentages of tuber defects.

8.5.2.2 Bagged Shipments

Determine the number of bags in the shipment and calculate the number of bags needed for an inspection. For example, a shipment of 500 cwt. (500 x 100 lb) bags would require the inspection of 500 lb or 5 bags. Each bag should be selected at random from various parts of the shipment. Entire contents of bag should be inspected. If an individual load consists of more than one lot, the required sampling plan for each lot must be calculated and each lot evaluated individually.

8.6 Inspection of Tuber Samples

After obtaining adequate representative samples of the lot in question the inspector should then proceed in the assessment of the lot to see if it meets the tuber standards set out in Section 48.1 of the Seeds Regulations Part II and any additional export requirements. The inspector should first ensure that all packaging materials are labelled properly and that they meet the requirements described in the Seeds Regulations Part II Seed Potatoes. The PI-009: Seed Potato Tuber Inspection Manual explains the process for identifying, scoring and recording defects and diseases. New inspectors will need to attend training workshops, review manuals and regulations and work with experienced inspectors for some time until they are finally audited and assessed to be proficient in that area.

The inspector should begin the inspection by counting the number of tubers in the sample. This is done to determine the overall percentage of defects found. Tuber standards are based on counts which are used to calculate the percentages of scoreable defects. The average count can be established after the inspection of 2-3 cwt samples. Once the average number of tubers per sample has been established, the entire tuber sample will not need to be counted and the inspector will only need to count the scoreable tubers. Record the results on a Seed Potato Tuber Inspection Report (CFIA/ACIA 3076). Information on the scoring of defects can be found in section 3.1 and related Appendices of PI-009: Seed Potato Tuber Inspection Manual.

Any visible defect or condition that may affect the quality of the bag or bulk load of tubers should be noted under comments on the Seed Potato Tuber Inspection Report (CFIA/ACIA 3076) and discussed with the grower in an effort to remove the problem. This could include the presence of stones, sprouts and dirt clods.

If an inspector determines that the seed potatoes in a shipment do not meet the grade standards as set out in the Seed Regulations Part II, the inspector shall request that the grower regrade the seed potatoes. Should the grower refuse to regrade the seed potatoes, the official tags must be returned to the inspector.

8.6.1 Cleanliness

Cleanliness requirements for seed potatoes are discussed in section 3.3 of PI-009: Seed Potato Tuber Inspection Manual. The presence of soil can interfere with performing a good inspection and the tubers should be reasonably clean. It may be necessary for the samples to be cleaned prior to scoring the defects. Documentation should not be issued unless the inspector is satisfied that the tubers are clean enough to perform an adequate inspection.

8.6.2 Defects not scored

In addition to the defects and diseases that are scoreable under the Seed Regulations Part II there are those that may be found during inspection that are not scoreable. Descriptions can be found in Appendix 12 of PI-009: Seed Potato Tuber Inspection Manual.

8.7 Phytosanitary Certification

A Phytosanitary Certificate is an official document issued by the plant protection organization of the exporting country to the plant protection organization of the importing country. It certifies that the regulated plants and plant products covered by the certificate are considered to be free from quarantine pests, practically free from other injurious pests, and that they conform with the importing country's requirements. The Phytosanitary Certificate is not a trade document and all information contained in the certificate is strictly confidential.

8.7.1 Significance of the Phytosanitary Certificate

A Phytosanitary Certificate is a legal document. It can only be issued once it has been established that the requirements of the importing county have been met and it can not be altered in any way. The responsibility for certification and accurate completion of the document rests with the Government of Canada. A Phytosanitary Certificate can only be issued by an Authorized Certification Official (ACO) who has successfully completed the evaluation and met the requirements outlined in Section 4.1 of the Quality System Manual for Authorized Certification (ACO) Program for the Signing of Phytosanitary Certificates.

Issuance of a Phytosanitary Certificate achieves two major objectives:

  • To confirm that the plants and plant products in the shipment do not pose any undue risk of introducing undesirable pests from the exporting country and to document to the plant protection organization of the importing country that the Canadian product conforms to the official phytosanitary import regulations of the country receiving the goods; and
  • To facilitate the flow of plants and plant products between countries.

8.7.2 Phytosanitary Documentation

This information is outlined in the training manual Export Certification: The Issuance of Phytosanitary Certificates (TM 157A01.2) and D-99-06: Policy on the Issuance of Phytosanitary Certificates.

8.7.3 Phytosanitary Inspection

Seed Potatoes being exported offshore must be inspected prior to shipment. The inspection is usually conducted at the grower's premise but it can alternatively be conducted at dockside or prior to last mode of transportation. It is a tuber grade inspection with special attention paid to the phytosanitary requirements of the importing country.

As discussed in Section 8.6.1, soil is a pathway for many types of plant pests and there may be agreements specifying soil limitations with various importing countries. Such conditions are governed by phytosanitary certification and should be expressed as gram of soil per kilogram of sample. If the soil exceeds the permitted quantity, the grower should be given the opportunity to regrade the seed stock to comply with requirements.

To determine the amount of soil by weight the inspector should first weigh the sample of tubers and any loose soil that may have been in the packaging. The tubers should then be washed and allowed to dry. Once the tubers have dried, they should be weighed again. The weight of the clean tubers should be subtracted from the weight of the tubers and soil prior to washing.

8.7.4 Preparation for Phytosanitary Inspection

An official request for a Phytosanitary Certificate must be received in writing prior to the initiation of the phytosanitary inspection procedures. The request should be reviewed and the exporter contacted if additional information is required.

Each importing country may have different import requirements: therefore the inspector must make sure all information is gathered prior to the tuber inspection. To prepare for an export inspection the inspector must:

  • Ensure that they have the most up to date Foreign Plant Quarantine Import Regulations (FPQIR). This information is maintained in a database by the Export and Technical Standards Section of the CFIA. There are three methods for accessing this information:
    1. Obtain authority to access the Export Certification System (ECS) - Plant which involves being trained on the system.
    2. Have somebody who has access to the ECS-Plant do a search on your behalf.
    3. Request information from the Export and Technical Standards Section if the information is not in ECS-Plant or if it is more than 2 years old. The inspector should be fully aware of import requirements prior to commencing the inspection. In cases where the inspector is not the ACO that will be issuing the Phytosanitary Certificate, he or she should consult with the ACO prior to commencing the inspection.
  • Review list of growers and seed potato certification numbers (provided by exporter) and determine their eligibility for certain special market requirements based on the FPQIR information (e.g. EU/EEC, BRR disease free zones, pest free zones).
  • Review import and contract requirements. Determine if laboratory tests of lots are needed and if copies of the results are required prior to issuance of the Phytosanitary Certificate.
  • A Permit to Import issued to the importer from the importing country's plant protection organization will list specific pests and tolerances to be adhered to. When Permit to Import is required, a copy should be obtained from the exporter and the inspector must ensure that all procedures listed on the permit are followed and that any phytosanitary requirements outlined on the permit are met.

8.7.5 Phytosanitary Inspection (Grower's Premise)

Packaging and labeling requirements as specified in the contract should be verified.

Inspectors must sample the lot at random and perform tuber inspection as explained earlier in this chapter and in section 4 of the PI-009: Seed Potato Tuber Inspection Manual. Under no circumstances can a shipment pass inspection if it fails to meet Canadian tolerances. The Canadian tolerances are the minimum standards for all tuber inspections and more stringent tolerances from importing countries will take precedence over the Canadian tolerances.

Some examples of tuber inspections to be done on the grower's premise include bulk loads, containers, polypropylene tote bags and bagged shipments.

8.7.5.1 Dockside Inspection Procedure

At dockside the inspector must:

  • Where possible, check the interior of the vehicle for any evidence of frost.
  • Take and record internal pulp temperatures.
  • Observe the general condition of containers (e.g. wet spots, broken containers, etc.).
  • Check the tags to verify correctly recorded variety, size, certification number, etc.
  • Check that the bags are new and that the bag markings do not make any reference to non-certified potatoes. Ensure the bags agree with certification tag information (e.g. size, variety, class, etc.).
  • Sample and inspect bags or containers taken at random from the load as outlined in sampling plan (refer to Section 8.5 of this chapter).
  • Determine if the load is acceptable and record the results of inspection on the Tuber Inspection Report (CFIA/ACIA 3076). Issue receipt for inspection fees as per the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Fees Notice, and complete the Seed Potato Shipment Report (CFIA/ACIA 2100). There may be regional variations in who issues the invoices and therefore inspectors should be aware of the procedures in their office.
  • Release the load for shipment to destination if the grade is acceptable and all phytosanitary conditions are met. The Authorized Certification Official will issue a Phytosanitary Certificate identifying all lots loaded on the ship.
  • If the load fails to pass inspection the load is returned to the grower's or packer's premises. The shipping point CFIA inspection office and the shipper are to be advised of the rejection of the load.
  • Issue a Notice of Detention (CFIA/ACIA 3256) on the load if the grade is unacceptable and order either:
    • Tag removal and disposal of the potatoes, or
    • Regrading of the seed under the supervision of an inspector. Once the load passes inspection, issue a Notice of Release from Detention (CFIA/ACIA 3257).

8.8 Tuber Reinspection

A reinspection may be requested by a buyer when tuber conditions are in conflict with either the established tuber standards at destination (Seeds Regulations Part II Section 48.1(1)) or size as indicated in an established contract between the buyer and seller. 

8.8.1 Reinspection Procedure

Upon reception, the purchaser of the seed potatoes can request a reinspection if she or he is not satisfied with the quality of the shipment. A request for reinspection must be made within two working days of receipt of the lot, and the reinspection is to be carried out by an inspector as soon as possible, but no later than five days after receipt of the request. The inspector must carry out the reinspection as promptly and as thoroughly as possible.

For a reinspection, an inspector must:

  • Get details of the complaint from the purchaser and acquire necessary shipping documents including a copy of the contract when available (especially if size is the complaint, size should be indicated on contract).
  • Be able to assure the continuity of identity of the shipment for which a reinspection has been requested. For example, if a bulk load of tubers has been transferred from the original carrier into pallet boxes, problems with identity (lot integrity) will be created, unless the inspector witnessed the transfer or other proof of identity can be established.
  • Check tags.
  • Take a random sample of the load. For bagged shipments, take samples from different pallets. The load should be sampled using a 1% sampling rate (see Section 8.5 of this chapter).
  • Follow the tuber inspection procedures as discussed previously in this chapter and in PI-009: Seed Potato Tuber Inspection Manual. Destination tolerances provided in Appendix 1 of the Seed Potato Tuber Inspection Manual and Section 48 of the Seed Regulations Part II should be used.
  • Record the results on the Seed Potato Tuber Inspection Report (CFIA/ACIA 3076) under reinspection.

8.8.2 Reinspection Procedure - Frost Damage

An example of a situation of where a reinspection may be called for is in the case of frost damage. Where indications of frost are evident to the purchaser and a request is made to assess the shipment the inspector must:

  • If accessible, examine the carrier for incidence of frost in the load or in the vehicle, check if the carrier was heated, inspect Temperature (Ryan) recorder, record temperature inside and outside the vehicle and take several tuber pulp temperatures from various locations in the load.
  • Determine the extent of the freezing by intensive sampling (i.e. is it localized or is it throughout the load).
  • Examine doors and air strips around doors to establish possible entry of cold air.
  • Let the potatoes stand if they are still frozen for at least one week to ten days (temperature 60°F (15°C) approximately) to determine final extent of damage.
  • Examine the bags for wet spots (may be caused by previously frozen potatoes).
  • Cut suspect tubers (internal graying will verify if they have been frozen or chilled).
  • Calculate the percentage of affected tubers and record results on the reinspection section of the Seed Potato Tuber Inspection Report (CFIA/ACIA 3076).
  • After inspection has taken place and the potatoes have warmed (15°C) for 7-10 days, they may be regraded for seed.
  • A shipment which is out of tolerance should be detained and either returned to its origin or regraded to meet the tolerances. Once the shipment meets the tolerances it can be released from detention.

8.9 The North American Seed Potato Health Certificate (NASPHC)

The NASPHC is used by the CFIA to assign a class to an imported seed lot which is equivalent to a class established in the Seeds Regulations Part II.  

A CFIA seed potato inspector must assign a seed class to imported field grown seed potatoes, as follows:

1. Identify the number of years the seed lot has been grown in the field. This is the generation number.

Do not rely on the class name for generations as they are not consistent from State to State and are not necessarily consistent with Canada's interpretation. For example, in many States the first generation in the field is the nuclear class and second field generation is called Generation 1.

2. Compare field readings of the lot with the tolerance for the equivalent generation.

  • Generation 1 - Pre-Elite
  • Generation 2 - Elite I
  • Generation 3 - Elite II
  • Generation 4 - Elite III
  • Generation 5 - Elite IV
  • Generation 6 - Foundation
  • Generation 7 - Certified

Assign a corresponding class to the imported seed lot if the final field reading listed on the North American Certified Seed Potato Health Certificate meets the Seeds Regulationstolerances for that class. If the field readings exceed the tolerance for that class, compare to the tolerances of the next lower class, until the readings match the tolerance set under the Seed Regulations.

The class assigned shall be the highest class allowed according to the tolerances set by the Seed Regulations, but no higher than the equivalent number of generations.

E.g.: A seed lot from California is submitted for classification has a 0.3 mosaic field reading and is classed as Generation 3 (G3) by the State Certification Agency.
G3 in California represents a class that has been in the field for four years (N being the first field generation followed by, G1, G2, G3). This would be equivalent to Elite 3 (E3) in the Canadian Certification Program. The disease tolerance for viruses is 0.2; this does not qualify for E3. The best class that can be assigned to the lot is Elite IV (tolerance of 0.3 for viruses)

Appendix 8 - 1 Forms Used For Tuber Inspection

The following is a description of forms used by CFIA inspectors for tuber inspection. Sample forms follow.

CFIA/ACIA 1278 - Special Permission for Sale of Seed Potatoes not Eligible for Official Tags
A document granting permission to a seed grower for the sale of seed potatoes of any class having a single tuber damage or defect in excess of established standards. These defects are limited to mechanical and physiological damage. This option should be only used for varieties in short supply or other special situations.
CFIA/ACIA 1327 - Phytosanitary Certificate
A certificate completed by Program Officer, or designate, to certify that the plant quarantine import requirements of the importing country have been met.
CFIA/ACIA 1347 - Permit Relating to Packing of Seed Potatoes
A permit authorizing the packing and re-packing of seed potatoes.
CFIA/ACIA 2100 - Seed Potato Ship Report
A report summarizing the cargo exported by ship. A report is to be filled out for each vessel at dockside.
CFIA/ACIA 2343 - Record of Bulk Movement for Seed Potatoes
A permit authorizing the sale and transport of seed potatoes in bulk. This form is used to permit movement of graded stock in bulk.
CFIA/ACIA 3076– Seed Potato Tuber Inspection Report
This document is completed following the inspection of seed potatoes. Includes pathogen levels as well as qualitative information.
CFIA/ACIA 3256 - Notice of Detention
Used to hold plants and seed potatoes when shipments are not in compliance with the Plant Protection Act, Seeds Act and Seeds Regulations Part II.
CFIA/ACIA 3257 - Notice of Release from Detention
A notice is issued when corrective action has been implemented which satisfies the Plant Protection Act, Seeds Act and Seeds Regulations Part II.
CFIA/ACIA 4378 - Certification of Authorization
Permits the movement of seed potatoes of a non-registered variety for which a crop certificate has been issued, between farm units in Canada.
CFIA/ACIA 4383 - Permit for Bulk Movement of Seed Potatoes for Packaging and Resale
A permit authorizing the movement of seed potatoes that are sold in bulk for the purpose of packaging and resale and are not required to be graded by the grower. The packager must do the grading prior to packaging and resale.
NACSPHC - North American Certified Seed Potato Health Certificate
A North American Certified Seed Potato Health Certificate is used to substantiate the health status of a seed potato lot to which a crop certificate applies. The certificate is used for re-certification of seed lots between Canada, the U.S. and Mexico

For samples of the following forms, refer to PI-009 Seed Potato Tuber Inspection Manual

Seed Potato Certification Tags: Nuclear Stock (CFIA /ACIA 5298), Elite (CFIA/ACIA 2113), Foundation (CFIA/ACIA 1370), Certified (CFIA/ACIA 2111)
Attached to containers of seed potatoes to identify class, variety and lot.
Seed Potato Tuber Inspection Report (CFIA/ACIA 3076)
Used with all tuber inspections by CFIA inspectors to record the tuber conditions of the potato crop. Additional information and observations such as maps, diagrams, and narrative descriptions may also be noted on this form during harvest/bin inspections by the CFIA.
CFIA/ACIA 1278 - Special Permission for Sale of Seed Potatoes not Eligible for Official Tags

The following image is an example of a Special Permission for Sale of Seed Potatoes not Eligible for Offical Tags form (CFIA/ACIA 1278) (These documents are intended for internal use. CFIA staff can access these documents).

Sample - CFIA/ACIA 1278 - Special Permission for Sale of Seed Potatoes not Eligible for Official Tags. Description follows.
Description for - Form CFIA/ACIA 1278

This image is an example of a Special Permission for Sale of Seed Potatoes not Eligible for Offical Tags form. In the first main section, boxes are provided to complete information regarding the quantity, class, variety, and certification number.

Below this row of boxes are two large boxes perpendicular to each other, one requiring the name and address of the consignee, and the other requiring the name and address of the grower. Below those two boxes are separate boxes for each of their signatures. The next section specifies that the permission given is for the original purchase only. At the bottom of the form there are boxes provided for the signature of the inspector and the date it was signed. The entire form is bilingual.

CFIA/ACIA 1327 - Phytosanitary Certificate

The following image is an example of a Phytosanitary Certificate (CFIA/ACIA 1327) (These documents are intended for internal use. CFIA staff can access these documents).

Sample - CFIA/ACIA 1327 - Phytosanitary Certificate. Description follows.
Description for - Form CFIA/ACIA 1327

Phytosanitary Certificate. It is a bilingual form that has two main sections.

The first section is titled Description of Consignment; this section provides information regarding the name and the address of the exporter, the declared name and address of the consignee, the number and description of packages, distinguishing marks, the place of origin, the declared means of conveyance, the declared point of entry, and the name of the produce and the quantity declared.

The second section is titled Disinfestation and/or Disinfection Treatment; this section requires information regarding the date, the treatment used and the details, the seal, additional declarations. At the bottom of the form there are spaces provided for information regarding the place of issue, the date it was signed, and the name of the authorized officer and his/her signature.

CFIA/ACIA 1347 - Permit Relating to Packing of Seed Potatoes

The following image is an example of a Permit Relating to Packing of Seed Potatoes (CFIA/ACIA 1347) (These documents are intended for internal use. CFIA staff can access these documents).

Sample - CFIA/ACIA 1347 - Permit Relating to Packing of Seed Potatoes. Description follows.
Description for - Form CFIA/ACIA 1347

This image is an example of a Permit relating to Packing of Seed Potatoes. This form provides boxes for information regarding the grower, the packer, and their telephone number. At the bottom of the form are boxes which provide space for the grower's name and his signature, and the date it was signed which declares that the seed potatoes are packed in accordance with sections 54(3), 55 or 56 of the Seeds Regulations Part II. There is a final box which provides space for the inspector's name, signature, and the date that it was signed.

CFIA/ACIA 2100 - Seed Potato Ship Report

The following image is an example of a Seed Potato Ship Report (CFIA/ACIA 2100) (These documents are intended for internal use. CFIA staff can access these documents).

Sample - CFIA/ACIA 2100 - Seed Potato Ship Report. Description follows.
Description for - Form CFIA/ACIA 2100

This image is an example of a Seed Potato Ship Report. The top portion of the form provides spaces for information regarding the port, crop year, report number, ship, agent, destination(s), loading dates, and temperature. The second portion of the form provides information regarding the overall contents of the cargo; the shipper(s), quantity, the size of the package, the variety, grade, origin, and the overall total of cargo. The bottom of the form provides sections for the inspector's names and remarks.

CFIA/ACIA 3076 - Seed Potato Tuber Inspection Report

The following image is an example of a Seed Potato Tuber Inspection Report (CFIA/ACIA 3076) (These documents are intended for internal use. CFIA staff can access these documents).

Sample - CFIA/ACIA 3076- Seed Potato Tuber Inspection Report. Description follows.
Description for - Form CFIA/ACIA 3076

This image is of an example of a Seed Potato Tuber Inspection Report. It is intended to be filled out by CFIA inspectors or by an individual that has been licensed by the CFIA to use the form during the inspection of seed potato tubers. The report provides a section at the top of the form for the shippers name, the certification number, the inspection point, variety, class, size, vehicle identification, estimated production of the entire lot, buyer`s destination, a check box for whether or not the vehicle was disinfected, there is a check box to indicate whether the shipment is in bags, crates or in bulk, and the number and size of packages, or total amount to be specified as appropriate.

There is a space to provide the Record of Bulk Movement number, the reason for the inspection (bin, harvest, shipping, dockside, and reinspection), and the temperature of the storage area and the tubers. The main portion of the form provides multiple smaller boxes to enter information regarding the number of tubers in count, whether there was scab, Rhizoctonia and how many of those were light medium or severe, whether there was soft rot or wet breakdown, dry rot, malformed, damage, internal necrosis and a total of diseases and defects, whether there were outgrown sprouts greater than 20 mm in length, pressure bruises, stem end discolouration between 6-13 mm in depth, whether or not the tubers are firm and the presence of any foreign variety, or oversized or undersized potatoes determined by weight.

The right portion of the form provides space to enter information regarding the number of tubers cut during inspection and the number of tubers scored. The bottom portion of the form provides space for remarks, and the inspectors or grower's signature, number, name, and the date they performed the inspection.

CFIA/ACIA 3256 - Notice of Detention (1 of 2)

The following image is an example of the first part of a Notice of Detention form (CFIA/ACIA 3256) (These documents are intended for internal use. CFIA staff can access these documents).

Sample - CFIA/ACIA 3256 - Notice of Detention (1 of 2). Description follows.
Description for - Form CFIA/ACIA 3256 (1 of 2)

This image is of the first part of a Notice of Detention Form. An inspector issues this form when he/she believes on reasonable grounds that there has been a violation, or an offence under one of the Acts administered by CFIA.

This form is used to detain something under one of the listed Acts and is issued to the person who is in care and control of what is being detained. At the top of the form there is a list of check boxes intended for one to select under which Act the things were detained under. At the top right corner of the form there is a box provided for the detention tag number.

In the next main section of the form it provides space for a description of what was seized, the quantity, and the date of seizure and detention. The section below this provides space for who the form was issued to, the place of seizure, who is believed to legally own what was seized, and where what was detained is now situated and detained at. The next main section of the form is intended for the reason for seizure and detention through outlining which section of the Act and the Act it was contrary to, and the section of the regulation and the regulation it was contrary to, the inspection documentation, the certification number, etc.

Below the reason for seizure is a space provided to describe the action to be taken to obtain release from detention. The bottom left section of the form provides boxes to select how the notice was given (whether by registered mail or delivered personally), and who it was receive by and their signature. It also provides checkboxes for who copies were sent to (the owner, inspector, person in possession of the thing described, or if there was another individual), and spaces for the identification of the transport to move the thing described, the consigner's name, the inspector's name, signature and telephone number, as well as the date and time it was signed.

CFIA/ACIA 3256 - Notice of Detention (2 of 2)

The following image is an example of the second part of a Notice of Detention form (CFIA/ACIA 3256) (These documents are intended for internal use. CFIA staff can access these documents).

Sample - CFIA/ACIA 3256 - Notice of Detention (2 of 2). Description follows.
Description for - Form CFIA/ACIA 3256 (2 of 2)

This image is of the second part of a Notice of Detention Form; the Under Detention Form. This form is issued by an inspector when a Notice of Detention is issued for something being detained. This form is affixed to the thing being detained to identify what has been detained. The top section of this form requires information such as: the detention tag number, the inspector's name, the signature of the inspector, and the date and time it was signed. The next main section of the form requires information such as the detail of the thing to which the tag applies, the quantity, the date it was seized and detained, who the form was issued to, the place of seizure, who it was believed to be legally owned by, and where it is now situated and detained. The next section of the form discusses the reason for seizure and detention through outlining which section of the Act and the Act it was contrary to, and the section of the regulation and the regulation it was contrary to. The final section provides a space for the action to be taken to obtain release from detention.

CFIA/ACIA 3257 - Notice of Release from Detention

The following image is an example of a Notice of Release from Detention form (CFIA/ACIA 3257) (These documents are intended for internal use. CFIA staff can access these documents).

Sample - CFIA/ACIA 3257 - Notice of Release from Detention. Description follows.
Description for - Form CFIA/ACIA 3257

This image is an example of a Notice of Release from Detention Form. This form is issued by an inspector when what has been detained has been determined to conform or has been brought into conformance with the ct and regulations of what it was detained under or after the expiry date of the detention. At the top of the form there are spaces provided for information such as the detention tag number, who the notice of release is issued to, and the date of seizure and detention.

The following section below provides space for the description of what is being detained and the quantity of it. Below this section is a notice in bold saying "You are hereby notified that the above-mentioned thing is released from detention". The section which follows this requires the reason for release from detention, how the notice was served (whether by registered mail or delivered personal), and who the receipt was acknowledged by. The majority of the right side of the form is a column intended for a summary of partial releases. The bottom of the form provides space for the signature of the inspector, the date it was signed, and the telephone number.

CFIA/ACIA 4378 - Certification of Authorization

The following image is an example of a Certification of Authorization form (CFIA/ACIA 4378) (These documents are intended for internal use. CFIA staff can access these documents).

Sample - CFIA/ACIA 4378 - Certification of Authorization. Description follows.
Description for - Form CFIA/ACIA 4378

This image is an example of a Certification of Authorization form. This form is issued by an inspector when a seed potato grower is selling within Canada a variety of potatoes that does not qualify for seed potato tags or a record of bulk movement for seed potatoes because the variety is not registered in Canada.

This form provides checkboxes to outline whether the seed potatoes are being shipped from the farm unit to another for the purpose of multiplication for the purpose of registration or for experimental purposes. Below this section there are spaces provided for the grower's name and the date it was filled out. The next section of the form provides the grower information on the left such as: the name of the grower, a description of the packages, the variety, and the class. The information provided on the right of this includes the consignee's name, the quantity, and the certification number. At the bottom of the form there are spaces for the director's signature and the date it was signed by them.

CFIA/ACIA 4383 - Permit for Bulk Movement of Seed Potatoes for Packaging and Resale

The following image is an example of a Permit for Bulk Movement of Seed Potatoes for Packaging and Resale (CFIA/ACIA 4383) (These documents are intended for internal use. CFIA staff can access these documents).

Sample - CFIA/ACIA 4383 - Permit for Bulk Movement of Seed Potatoes for Packaging and Resale. Description follows.
Description for - Form CFIA/ACIA 4383

This image is an example of a Permit for Bulk Movement of Seed Potatoes for Packaging and Resale. This form is issued by an inspector when a seed potato grower is moving ungraded seed potatoes to another location other than the growers' farm so that they can be graded and packaged at that location.

This form is one large box with smaller sections within it, intended for specific information. The information required in the form include: the variety, the class, the certification number, the grower, the packer, the quantity, the inspector's name and signature, and the date it was signed. At the bottom of the form there is a line provided for the grower's signature and the date it was signed by them.

NACSPHC - North American Certified Seed Potato Health Certificate

The following image is an example of a North American Certified Seed Potato Health Certificate (NACSPHC).

Sample - NACSPHC - North American Certified Seed Potato Health Certificate. Description follows.
Description for - North American Certified Seed Potato Health Certificate

This image is an example of a North American Certified Seed Potato Health Certificate. This form is used by a certification official either in the US or Canada to determine the pedigree and equivalent class of seed potato lots imported for certification as seed. At the top of the form boxes are provided for information regarding the names, and cities and states/provinces of the grower and importer. Below this, there is also information required regarding the variety, number of acres, quantity shipped, and the size.

There is a section for the lot certification which requires information regarding the certification number, the seed class/generation, the certifying state/province, whether the lot originated from tissue culture, and the year it was micropropagated for planting and by who. The following section is intended for the production environment pedigree, and contains a table for the years 2000 up to 2007, each have its own column and four rows for inserting information. The years signify the year of production, the first row is for greenhouse (insect excluding) and sterile soil, the second row is for the field, the third row is for the certification number, and the final row is for the certifying state; to the right side of the page there is also a box available for the number of years produced in field soil.

The next section is intended for Summer Field Readings; it provides boxes for the first, second, third, and final field inspections. The rows below are intended for the percent of leaf roll found, the percent of mosaic found, the percent of varietal mixture, the percent of blackleg, the percent of verticillium added to the percent of fusarium, and the percent of early blight. To the right side of this table there is a separate column for the final percentage of all four field inspections for the total percentages of leaf roll, mosaic, and varietal mixture. To the far right of the form, it requires information for post-harvest readings such as the location, the sample number, the plant count, and the ELISA test results for latent viruses (PVY and PVX). At the bottom of the form it also provides spaces for other diseases like Bacterial Ring Rot and Late Blight; whether the not know to occur in the growers area, the number of years since it was last found on the grower's farm or none on record, or if it was not found this year during normal certification field inspections.

Below this, it is required to indicate if the seed potatoes are eligible for recertification in the area of production or not. The bottom of the form provides a space for notes, the program official, agency, date, telephone number, and fax number.

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