Guide to Submitting Applications for Registration
Under the Fertilizers Act

Appendices

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Appendix 1: Mandatory List of Tabs and Sub-Tabs

Figure 1: Format of the submission
Long Description: This image represents the mandatory format for submitting an application for registration under the Fertilizers Act.

This image includes a structured list of tabs and sub-tabs to assist applicants in preparing well organized submissions. The entitled tabs and sub-tabs include:

  • Administrative Forms and Fees
    • Cover Letter
    • Application Form
    • Signing Authority
    • Fees
  • Marketplace Label
  • Product Specifications
    • List of ingredients
    • Manufacturing Process
    • Quality Assurance/Control
    • Product Qualities
  • Results of Analysis
  • Safety Rationale and Supplemental Data
    • Hazard Characterization
    • Risk Assessment
    • References/Data

Safety assessment levels and required sections by TAB

Safety Assessment Level I: Complete Tabs 1-3
Safety Assessment Level II: Complete Tabs 1-4
Safety Assessment Level III: Complete Tabs 1-5

Figure 1: Format of the submission. All Tabs are mandatory and omitting any Tabs will result in the application for registration being rejected / returned to applicant during the first response stage. Please adhere to the headings of each tab as identified in the guide.

Appendix 2: Product Ingredients and Associated Safety Data Requirements

The presence of an active or inert ingredient in the product may trigger additional safety requirements. Bolded materials trigger registration when guaranteed on the product label. All products comprising or containing industrial by-products or recycled organic materials require Tab 4 (Results of Analysis).

Level I
Tabs 1, 2, 3 Tab 4 - Metals Tab 4 - Dioxins Furans Tab 4 - Indicator Organisms Tab 5
Indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) at a concentration not exceeding 1% of the product excluding products for commercial spray application checkmark
VAMs (Vesicular Arbuscular Myccorhizae) provided the species is substantially equivalent/representative of VAM group checkmark
Rhizobia (species of the genera Rhizobium, Bradyrhizobium, Mesorhizobium and Sinorhizobium) provided the species is substantially equivalent/representative of the rhizobia group, and is not genetically modified. checkmark
Bacillus subtilis provided the strain is representative of the species, is not genetically modified and does not produce any human enterotoxin. checkmark
Level II
Tabs 1, 2, 3 Tab 4 - Metals Tab 4 - Dioxins Furans Tab 4 - Indicator Organisms Tab 5
Mineral derived nutrients mixed fertilizers, for farm use, meets no other exemptions checkmark checkmark Table Note 2
Biochar checkmark checkmark checkmark
Micronutrients Table Note 3 checkmark checkmark Table Note 2
Humic and Fulvic Acids checkmark checkmark Table Note 2
Seaweed checkmark checkmark checkmark
Farm Fertilizers containing Cement Kiln Dust checkmark checkmark Table Note 4 checkmark
Farm Fertilizers containing Compost checkmark checkmark checkmark
Farm Fertilizers containing Meals checkmark checkmark checkmark
Farm Fertilizers containing Processed sewage including composts thereof checkmark checkmark checkmark checkmark
Farm Fertilizers containing Pulp and paper sludge checkmark checkmark checkmark checkmark
Farm Fertilizers containing Wood ash checkmark checkmark checkmark

Table Notes

Table note 2

source dependent.

Return to table note 2  referrer

Table Note 3

micronutrients only require registration when they are not combined with any other type of nutrient (i.e. nitrogen, phosphorous, or potassium).

Return to table note 3  referrer

Table Note 4

requires Thallium and Vanadium testing in addition to the 11 standard metal analytes.

Return to table note 4  referrer

Level III
Tabs 1, 2, 3 Tab 4 - Metals Tab 4 - Dioxins Furans Tab 4 - Indicator Organisms Tab 5
Polymer coated fertilizers Table Note 5 checkmark checkmark
Polymeric soil stabilizers checkmark checkmark
Wetting agents and surfactants checkmark checkmark
Nano-encapsulated fertilizers and nano-materials Table Note 6 checkmark checkmark
Plant growth regulators other than IBA as described above checkmark checkmark
Plant signalling compounds (e.g. LCOs, Hesperetin, Naringenin) checkmark checkmark
Registerable supplement(s) that would themselves require a full safety data package, blended with fertilizer. checkmark Table Note 7 Table Note 7 Table Note 7 checkmark
Inoculant extenders sold with an inoculant checkmark checkmark checkmark
Viable microorganism(s) other than those described in Level I checkmark checkmark checkmark
Metabolites of organism(s) checkmark checkmark checkmark

Table Notes

Table Note 5

polymer coated fertilizers require safety assessment even if exempt from registration.

Return to table note 5  referrer

Table Note 6

all products in part or in whole comprised of nano-materials require full safety assessment.

Return to table note 6  referrer

Table note 7

Basic Results of Analysis required depending on the ingredients.

Return to table note 7  referrer

Note: this does not constitute a comprehensive list of product /ingredient - specific requirements.

Appendix 3: Metals, Dioxins/Furans Standards and Maximum Acceptable Level of Indicator Organisms in Fertilizers and Supplements

Metals Standards

The CFIA metals standards are predicated on the maximum acceptable cumulative metal addition to soils over a 45 year time period (refer to Table 3), as opposed to the metal concentration in the product per se. Hence, the application rate of a product is a crucial element in determining acceptable product metal concentrations. The rationale behind the 45 year cumulative application approach is intended to account for the persistence of metals in the environment which ultimately determines the level of contamination and thus, long term impacts.

The maximum acceptable product metal concentration (in mg metal/kg product) is calculated for each metal using the CFIA standards for maximum acceptable 45-year cumulative metal additions to soil (identified in Table 3) and the product's maximum recommended annual application rate as follows:

equation
Description

The maximum acceptable concentration of a metal of concern in a product is equal to one million times the maximum acceptable cumulative addition of the metal of concern to soil over 45 years divided by the product's annual application rate times 45.

In cases where a fertilizer product does not have an application rate indicated on the label, the 95th percentile of the provincially recommended agronomic application rates for the guaranteed nutrients are used to determine the appropriate application rate. Detailed information on the metals standards (including the relevant calculations) can be found in Trade Memorandum T-4-93 Standards for metals in fertilizers and supplements. Table 3 shows the acceptable metals concentrations for products at different application rates.

Table 3. CFIA Metals Standards and Maximum Acceptable Fertilizer/Supplement Metal Concentrations
Metal Maximum Acceptable Cumulative Metal Additions to Soil over 45 Years
(kg metal/ha)
Maximum Acceptable Product Metal Concentration Based on Annual Application Rates
(mg metal/kg product) 4400 kg/hayr
Maximum Acceptable Product Metal Concentration Based on Annual Application Rates
(mg metal/kg product) 2000 kg/hayr
Maximum Acceptable Product Metal Concentration Based on Annual Application Rates
(mg metal/kg product) 500 kg/hayr
Arsenic (As) 15 75 166 666
Cadmium (Cd) 4 20 44 177
Chromium (Cr) 210 1,060 2,333 9,333
Cobalt (Co) 30 151 333 1,333
Copper (Cu) 150 757 1,666 6,666
Mercury (Hg) 1 5 11 44
Molybdenum (Mo) 4 20 44 177
Nickel (Ni) 36 181 400 1,600
Lead (Pb) 100 505 1,111 4,444
Selenium (Se) 2.8 14 31 124
Zinc (Zn) 370 1,868 4,111 16,444

Dioxins/Furans Standard

The CFIA standard for maximum acceptable cumulative addition to soils of polychlorinated dibenzo-p- dioxins (dioxins; PCDD) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (furans; PCDF) is 5.355 mg TEQ/ha over 45 years (where TEQ = Toxic Equivalency Quotient). Like the CFIA metals standards, the application rate of a product is a crucial element in determining acceptable product dioxins/furans concentrations and the 45 year cumulative application approach is employed to account for environmental persistence and long-term impacts.

The maximum acceptable product dioxins/furans concentration (in ng TEQ/kg product) is calculated using the CFIA standard for maximum acceptable 45-year cumulative dioxins/furans addition to soil (5.355mg TEQ/ha) and the product's maximum recommended annual application rate as follows:

equation
Description

The maximum acceptable concentration of dioxins and furans in a product is equal to one million times the maximum acceptable cumulative addition of dioxins and furans to soil over 45 years divided by the product's annual application rate times 45.

In addition, a maximum product concentration of 100 ng TEQ/kg product is being considered to protect workers and bystanders. Table 4 shows the dioxin/furan acceptable concentrations for products at different application rates.

Table 4. Maximum Acceptable PCDD/Fs Concentrations in Fertilizer/Supplement
Maximum Acceptable Cumulative PCDD/F Additions to Soil over 45 Years (mg TEQ/ha) Permissible PCDD/F Concentration Based on Annual Application Rates (ng TEQ/ha) 4400 kg/hayr Permissible PCDD/F Concentration Based on Annual Application Rates (ng TEQ/ha) 2000 kg/hayr
PCDD/F 5.355 27 59.5

Indicator Organisms

Salmonella and Faecal coliforms are currently used as indicators of microbial contamination and effectiveness of treatment process. Table 5 shows the maximum acceptable level of Salmonella and faecal coliforms in fertilizers and supplements.

Table 5. Maximum Acceptable Level of Indicator Organisms in Fertilizers and Supplements
Indicator Organism Level Minimum Detection Limit
Salmonella Not Detectable less than 1 CFU (Colony Forming Unit)/25 grams
Faecal Coliforms 1000 MPN (Most Probable Number)/ gram less than 2 CFU/gram

Appendix 4: Toxicological Hazards Characterization

Ingredient Identification
Characteristic
Ingredient
Chemical Abstract Number (CAS#)
Relative Concentration in final product
Physical Chemical Properties
Exposure Model Inputs Hazard Criteria Value Reference(s)
Organic carbon partitioning coefficient (Koc)
Log Octanol Water partitioning coefficient (Log Kow)
Water Solubility at 25°C
Vapour Pressure
Persistence Air ≥ 2 days
Persistence Water ≥ 6 months
Persistence Soil ≥ 6 months
Persistence Sediment ≥ 1 year
Bioaccumulation, Bioconcentration, Biomagnification Factors > 5000
Mammalian Hazard Profile
Endpoint by Exposure Route Hazard Criteria Table Note 8 Test Organism Term Effect Dose Reference(s)
Oral Acute LD50 ≤ 500 mg/kg bw
Oral Subchronic LO(A)EL ≤ 90 mg/kg bw
Oral Subchronic NO(A)EL ≤ 30 mg/kg bw
Oral Chronic LO(A)EL ≤ 30 mg/kg bw
Oral Chronic NO(A)EL ≤ 10 mg/kg bw
Dermal Acute LD50 ≤ 500 mg/kg bw
Dermal Irritation/Sensitization
Inhalation Acute LD50 ≤ 1500 mg/m3
Ocular Irritation
Carcinogenicity For each ingredient where there is indication of carcinogenicity proceed to Appendix 5. Table Note 8
Clastogenicity and Mutagenicity For each ingredient where there is indication of clastogenicity or mutagenicity proceed to Appendix 5.
Reproductive/Developmental Toxicity, Teratogenicity For each ingredient where there is indication of reproductive/developmental toxicity, teratogenicity proceed to Appendix 5.
Endocrine Disruption For each ingredient where there is indication of endocrine disruption proceed to Appendix 5.

Table Notes

Table note 8

Cancer potency factor (q1*)

Return to table note 8  referrer

Aquatic Hazard Profile
Category Hazard Criteria Table Note 9 Test Organism Term Effect Concn Reference(s)
Vertebrate (e.g. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), Brook trout (Salvelinaus fontinalis), Fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), Bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus)) Acute: Lowest EC50 or LC50 < 0.1 ppm
Invertebrate (e.g. Daphnia (Daphnia sp., Ceriodaphnia dubia), Zebra fish (Brachydanio rerio), Worm (Lumbriculus variegatus)) Acute: Lowest EC50 or LC50 < 0.1 ppm
Benthic (e.g. Amphipod (Hyallela azteca), Midge larvae (Chironomus tentans, Chironomus riparius)) Acute: Lowest EC50 or LC50 < 0.1 ppm
Algae (e.g. Pseudokrchneriella subcapitata, Champia parvula) Acute: Lowest EC50 or LC50 < 0.1 ppm

Table Notes

Table note 9

For each ingredient where any of the hazard criteria are met, proceed to Appendix 5

Return to table note 9  referrer

Appendix 5: Toxicological Exposure and Risk Assessment

Only to be populated for high hazard ingredients (i.e. those that meet any of the Hazard Criteria identified in Appendix 4)

Mixer/Applicator

Exposure Assessment
Assumption/Derivation/Rationale
Application methodology/equipment
Application rate
Area of application (ha)
Frequency of application
Expected route(s) of exposure
(e.g. dermal, inhalation) based on application method and product and constituent physico-chemical properties
Mitigative Factors Limiting Exposure
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
Dermal Absorption Factor (if applicable) (% of oral dose) (DAF) Provide value and associated reference
Estimate of exposure, A (mg/kg bw/d) Show derivation and associated modelling assumptions
Risk Assessment
Assumption/Derivation/Rationale
Critical endpoint and critical, B (mg/kg bw/d) and/or
Cancer potency factor, q1* (mg/kg bw/d)-1
As identified in Appendix 4
Margin of Safety (B/A) and/or
Incremental Lifetime Cancer Risk (ILCR) (q1* x A)

Bystander/Indirect

Exposure Assessment
Assumption/Derivation/Rationale
Method of exposure
(e.g. drift, re-entry, soil contact or consumption, potable water, plant residues)
Application rate
Area of application
Frequency of exposure
Application setting (e.g. agriculture, greenhouse, residential)
Re-entry Interval
Expected route(s) of exposure
(e.g. dermal, inhalation) based on application method and product and constituent physico-chemical properties
Environmental media concentration (ppm) (as required) Exceedance of persistence screening criteria (Appendix 4) must be accounted for in this derivation
Estimate of exposure, A (mg/kg bw/d) Show derivation, identify model used and associated modelling assumptions
Risk Assessment
Assumption/Derivation/Rationale
Critical endpoint dose, B (mg/kg bw/d) and/or
Cancer potency factor, q1* (mg/kg bw/d)-1
As identified in Appendix 4
Margin of Safety (B/A) and/or
Incremental Lifetime Cancer Risk (ILCR) (q1* x A)

Environmental

Exposure Assessment
Assumption/Derivation/Rationale
Expected target environmental media
(e.g. soil, air, aquatic, sediment) based on application method and product and constituent physico-chemical properties
Application methodology/equipment
Application rate
Frequency of application
Environmental media concentration estimate, C (ppm)
(e.g. impregnated granule, soil, sediment or aquatic concentration)
Show derivation, identify model used and associated modelling assumptions
Exceedance of persistence and/or biomagnification/bioaccumulation/ bioconcentration screening criteria (Appendix 4) must be accounted for in this derivation
Organism(s) of concern exposure estimate(s), D (mg/kg bw/d)
(if applicable, e.g. avian/terrestrial vertebrate toxicity)
Show derivation, identify model used and associated assumptions (e.g. daily soil/granule ingestion rate)
Risk Assessment
Assumption/Derivation/Rationale
Organism(s) of concern and associated critical environmental concentration(s), E (ppm) As identified in Appendix 4
Organism(s) of concern and associated critical dose, F (mg/kg bw/d)
(if applicable e.g. avian/terrestrial vertebrate toxicity)
As identified in Appendix 4
Risk Quotient (E/C)
Margin of Safety (F/D)
(if applicable e.g. avian/terrestrial vertebrate toxicity)

B The critical effect is typically the first adverse effect that occurs with increasing dose; the critical dose is the dose at which this adverse effect is observed.

The carcinogenic potency factor (q1*) is a measure of the relative strength of a non-threshold carcinogen.

Appendix 6: Microbial Hazard Characterization (Checklist)

Organism Hazard Yes/No References
Human Pathogenicity/Toxicity
Human Sensitization/Irritation
Human Dermatophytic potential
Human Toxigenicity Table Note 10
Mammals Pathogenicity/Toxicity
Mammals Sensitization/Irritation
Mammals Dermatophytic potential
Mammals Toxigenicity Table Note 10
Other terrestrial vertebrates (e.g. birds) Pathogenicity/Toxicity
Other terrestrial vertebrates (e.g. birds) Sensitization/Irritation
Other terrestrial vertebrates (e.g. birds) Toxigenicity Table Note 10
Terrestrial plants/crops Pathogenicity/Toxicity
Terrestrial plants/crops Growth inhibition
Terrestrial plants/crops Post-harvest spoilage
Terrestrial invertebrates (e.g. bees, earthworms, springtails) Pathogenicity/Toxicity
Aquatic vertebrates (fishes) Pathogenicity/Toxicity
Aquatic invertebrates (benthic, epibenthic) Pathogenicity/Toxicity
Aquatic plants (algae) Pathogenicity/Toxicity

Table Notes

Table note 10

Hazard to a toxin can be estimated using established chemical models (see Appendix 4)

Return to table note 10  referrer

Appendix 7: Microbial Exposure Characterization - Factors to Consider

Natural occurrence:
Category References
Geographical distribution
Natural habitats: soils, water, atmosphere, on or inside of living organisms (e.g. endophyte, epiphyte)
Hosts (symbiotic, saprophytic or pathogenic relationships)
Food/feed crops on which the microorganism is found in nature
Residues on food/feed (accumulation of the microorganism or its metabolites in the edible portion of the plant) Table Note 11

Table Notes

Table Note 11

Residue data are used to estimate the dietary exposure of humans and livestock to microbial toxins.

Return to table note 11  referrer

Physiological properties:
Category References
Growth parameters (e.g. temperature, pH, osmotic minima, maxima and optima)
Nutritional dependence, oxygen requirements, energy sources
Susceptibility to antibiotics, metals and environmental factors such as sunlight and desiccation
Favorable conditions for toxin production Table Note 12

Table Notes

Table Note 12

Exposure to a toxin can be estimated using established chemical models (see Appendix 5).

Return to table note 12  referrer

Description of the life cycle:
Category References
Characteristics of the different forms of the microorganism during its life cycle (e.g. motile cells, dormant cysts, spores)
Mechanism for reproduction and dispersal
Mechanism for survival (in adverse conditions)
Potential for dispersal of traits or gene transfer (mandatory for microorganisms modified by molecular biological techniques)
Unusual properties:
Category References
Unusual properties of the notified strain that differ from the classical description of the species (mandatory for microorganisms modified by molecular biological techniques)
Product Use Pattern:
Category References
Crops/plants on which the product is intended to be used Label
Application methodology/equipment Label
Application rate Label
Frequency of application Label
Expected route(s) of exposure (e.g. dermal, inhalation, ingestion)

Appendix 8: Considerations for classification of Microbial Hazard Severity and Exposure Level

Classification Considerations for classification Hazard Severity Considerations for classification Exposure Level
High
  • Significant uncertainty in the identification, characterization or possible effects.
  • Disease in healthy humans/animals/plants is severe or may be lethal.
  • Disease in susceptible humans/animals/plants may be lethal.
  • Lethal or severe (irreversible) effects in laboratory mammals/plants at maximum hazard dose.
  • Potential for horizontal transmission/community-acquired infection.
  • Irreversible adverse effects (e.g., loss of biodiversity, loss of habitat, serious disease).
  • The release quantity, duration and/or frequency are high.
  • The organism is likely to survive, persist, disperse proliferate and become established in the environment.
  • Dispersal or transport to other environmental compartments is likely.
  • The nature of release makes it likely that susceptible living organisms will be exposed.
  • In relation to exposed organisms, routes of exposure are permissive of toxic or pathogenic effects in susceptible organisms.
  • Presence of residue on food/feed (microorganism or its toxins).
Medium
  • Case reports of human/animal/plant disease in the scientific literature are limited to susceptible populations or are rare, localized and rapidly self-resolving in healthy humans/animals/plants.
  • Effects at maximum hazard dose in laboratory mammals/plants are not lethal, and are rapidly self-resolving.
  • Low potential for horizontal transmission/community-acquired infection.
  • Some adverse but reversible or self-resolving effects.
  • It is released into the environment, but quantity, duration and/or frequency of release is moderate.
  • It may persist in the environment, but in low numbers.
  • The potential for dispersal/transport is limited.
  • The nature of release is such that some susceptible living organisms may be exposed.
  • In relation to exposed organisms, routes of exposure are not expected to favour toxic or pathogenic effects.
Low
  • No case reports of human/animal/plant disease in the scientific literature, or case reports associated with predisposing factors are rare and without potential for secondary transmission and any effects are mostly mild, asymptomatic, or benign.
  • No adverse effects seen at maximum dose in laboratory mammals/plants by any route of exposure.
  • Well characterized and identified with no adverse environmental effects known.
  • May have theoretical negative impacts for a short period but no predicted long term effect for microbial, plant and/or animal populations or ecosystems.
  • Has a history of safe use over several years.
  • It is used in containment (no intentional release).
  • The nature of release and/or the biology of the microorganism are expected to contain the microorganism such that susceptible populations or ecosystems are not exposed.
  • Low quantity, duration and frequency of release of microorganisms that are not expected to survive, persist, disperse or proliferate in the environment where released.

Source: Adapted from Environment Canada and Health Canada (2011): Framework for Science-Based Risk Assessment of Micro-Organisms Regulated under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999

Note: Combinations of the factors within each generalized hazard severity or exposure level above are possible and would affect the overall hazard or exposure assessment.

Appendix 9: Labelling Requirements for Fertilizer-Pesticides Permitted for Home and Garden Uses

Corn Gluten Meal
Common Name: Table Note 14 Corn gluten meal
Guaranteed analysis: Table Note 13 Table Note 14 Corn gluten meal (actual) Table Note 13
Approved For Use: Table Note 14 In specialty lawn/turf fertilizers containing compatible fertilizer constituent materials.
Approved Claims: Table Note 13 Table Note 14

Pre-emergence inhibition of large and smooth crabgrass, white clover and dandelion seed germination in residential lawns where established perennial ryegrass or established Kentucky bluegrass are the predominant grass species.

Pre-emergence inhibition of large crabgrass, white clover and dandelion seed germination in public areas such as sports fields, parks, golf areas, and sod farms, where established perennial ryegrass or established Kentucky bluegrass are the predominant grass species.

Application Rates: Table Note 13 Table Note 14 9500 - 9800 g of corn gluten meal / 100m2
Directions For Use: Table Note 13 Table Note 14

May inhibit weed seed germination when used in conjunction with a sound lawn (or turf) maintenance program. Table Note 13

Established weeds at time of application will not be inhibited. Table Note 13

Do not apply the product on newly seeded grass as it may inhibit seeds from germinating, wait until after first mowing when root systems are established. Table Note 13

If over-seeding or re-sodding in the spring, do not apply the product in the spring. If over-seeding or re-sodding in the fall, do not apply the product in the fall. Table Note 13

For best results: Apply to established turf twice a year; once in the early spring 2 weeks before weed seed germination, and once in the late summer or early fall after heat stress has passed. Table Note 13

Apply when soil is moist and when rain is forecasted within 2 days of treatment. If rainfall does not occur within 2 days of treatment, irrigation is required. Excessive moisture at time of treatment may reduce the effectiveness of the product. Table Note 13

Do not apply under windy conditions.

Product application dates may vary for both the spring and late summer/early fall application from year to year according to weather conditions.

The inhibitory effect of the product to weed seeds generally dissipates in five weeks following application.

Apply to a mature lawn having a well-developed root mass.

Large crabgrass seeds germinate when soil temperature reaches 12.8°C.

Precautions: Table Note 13 Table Note 14

Keep Out Of Reach Of Children [On Main And Secondary Panels]. Table Note 13 Table Note 14

Read The Label Before Using [On Main Panel]. Table Note 13 Table Note 14

Caution Eye Irritant [On Main Panel]. Table Note 13 Table Note 14

Potential Sensitizer [On Main Panel]. Table Note 13 Table Note 14

May cause sensitization. Table Note 13

Avoid contact with skin, eyes or clothing. Table Note 13

Avoid inhaling dusts. Table Note 13

For good hygiene practice, wear a long-sleeved shirt, long pants, closed footwear and gloves when handling the product. Table Note 13

It is recommended that a dust mask be worn when transferring the product to the spreader. Table Note 13

Should not be applied if the applicator or a member of the household has a sensitivity or allergy to corn. Table Note 13

First Aid: Table Note 13 Table Note 14

If Swallowed: Table Note 13 Table Note 14 Rinse mouth and throat with copious amounts of water. Do not induce vomiting. Table Note 13

If On Skin/Clothing: Table Note 13 Table Note 14 Take off contaminated clothing. Wash skin with plenty of soap and water. Table Note 13

If Inhaled: Table Note 13 Table Note 14 Move to fresh air. Table Note 13

If In Eyes: Table Note 13 Table Note 14 Hold eye open and rinse slowly and gently with water. Remove contact lenses if present, then continue rinsing eye. Table Note 13

General: Table Note 13 Table Note 14 Seek medical attention immediately if irritation or signs of toxicity occur and persist or is severe. Take container, label or product name and registration number with you when seeking medical attention. Table Note 13

Toxicological Information: Table Note 13 Table Note 14 Treat symptomatically. Table Note 13
Storage: Table Note 13 Table Note 14 Keep in cool, dry conditions, away from seed, fertilizer and other pesticides. Keep away from fire, open flame, or other sources of heat. Table Note 13
Disposal: Table Note 13 Table Note 14 Do not re-use empty container. Dispose in accordance with municipal or provincial regulations if applicable. If no such regulations apply, wrap and dispose of empty container with household garbage.
Notice To User: Table Note 13 Table Note 14 This product is to be used in accordance with the directions on this label. It is an offence under the Pest Control Products Act to use this product under unsafe conditions.
Accepted Compatible Pesticide Active Ingredients: Table Note 14 None
Approved Brands Of Pesticide Products: Table Note 14 Refer to the corn gluten meal section PMRA's approved brands of pesticide products

Table Notes

Table note 13

The headings or statements must appear on the label. Note: The other statements are recommended but not required.

Return to table note 13  referrer

Table note 14

Must be capitalized on the label unless otherwise indicated.

Return to table note 14  referrer

Note: The exact wording of all statements is encouraged but not mandatory as long as the meaning is the same. No contradictory information may appear on the label.

Note: Text in square brackets [ ] is additional information and should not be included on the label.

Ferrous Sulphate
Common Name: Table Note 16 FERROUS SULPHATE Table Note 16
Guaranteed Analysis: Table Note 15 Table Note 16 Ferrous Sulphate (actual) Table Note 15
Approved For Use: Table Note 16 In specialty lawn/turf fertilizers containing compatible fertilizer constituent materials.
Approved Claims: Table Note 15 Table Note 16 Controls moss in lawns.
Application Rates: Table Note 15 Table Note 16 250 - 980 g of Ferrous sulphate / 100m2
Directions For Use: Table Note 15 Table Note 16

In lawns: Moss will take over under conditions of poor light, poor drainage and inadequate plant food. Prune trees to open up and reduce shade. Improve drainage with tiling, slit trenching or contouring.

Fertilize on a regular basis.

For immediate control of moss water lawn thoroughly. Spray on recommended rate. Water in to wash off grass blades; then with-hold water for several days. May also be applied at dry rate, but water in thoroughly immediately after application.

Precautions: Table Note 15 Table Note 16

KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN. Table Note 15 Table Note 16

READ LABEL BEFORE USING [on main panel]. Table Note 15 Table Note 16

Harmful if swallowed. Table Note 15

Avoid contact with eyes, skin and clothing. Table Note 15

Avoid breathing dust or spray mist. Table Note 15

Store in its original container tightly closed and away from children and pets. Table Note 15

Wash hands after use.

May stain stone, brick masonry or light coloured sidings.

May corrode bare metal.

Flush off spills with clear water.

Do not use on cement products such as sidewalks, patios, blocks, stucco, etc.

First Aid: Table Note 15 Table Note 16

If Swallowed: Table Note 16 Get medical attention or contact poison control centre.

If In Eyes: Table Note 16 Flush with plenty of water and get medical attention or contact poison control centre.

If On Skin: Table Note 16 Wash with soap and water. Table Note 15

Disposal: Table Note 15 Table Note 16 Discard empty container in household garbage.
Accepted Compatible Pesticide Active Ingredients: Table Note 16 None
Approved Brands Of Pesticide Products: Table Note 16 Refer to the ferrous sulphate section PMRA's approved brands of pesticide products

Table Notes

Table note 15

The headings or statements must appear on the label. Note: The other statements are recommended but not required.

Return to table note 15  referrer

Table note 16

Must be capitalized on the label unless otherwise indicated.

Return to table note 16  referrer

Note: The exact wording of all statements is encouraged but not mandatory as long as the meaning is the same. No contradictory information may appear on the label.

Note: Text in square brackets [ ] is additional information and should not be included on the label.

Appendix 10: Information Resources - Toxicology

Web Resources – Toxicology
Website name Description of website

ChemIDplus

ChemIDplus is a free, web-based search system that provides access to structure and nomenclature authority files used for the identification of chemical substances cited in National Library of Medicine (NLM) databases, including the TOXNET® system. ChemIDplus also provides structure searching and direct links to many biomedical resources at NLM and on the Internet for chemicals of interest. The database contains over 379,000 chemical records, of which over 257,000 include chemical structures, and is searchable by Name, Synonym, CAS Registry Number, Molecular Formula, Classification Code, Locator Code, and Structure.

The Domestic Substances List Search Engine (Environment Canada)

The DSL is the sole basis for determining whether a substance is new for the purposes of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999. Locating your substance on the DSL does not constitute an endorsement from Environment Canada in respect of use or sale in Canada. Furthermore, the status of the substance on the DSL does not constitute an exemption from the application of any other laws (whether statutes, regulations or other) that may also apply to this substance or related activities.

Environmental Residue-Effects Database (ERED)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers/U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Environmental Residue-Effects Database (ERED) is a compilation of data, taken from the literature, where biological effects (e.g. reduced survival, growth, etc.) and tissue contaminant concentrations were simultaneously measured in the same organism. Currently, the database is limited to those instances where biological effects observed in an organism are linked to a specific contaminant within its tissues.

ECOTOX

The ECOTOX (ECOTOXicology) database provides single chemical toxicity information for aquatic and terrestrial life. ECOTOX is a useful tool for examining impacts of chemicals on the environment. Peer-reviewed literature is the primary source of information encoded in the database. Pertinent information on the species, chemical, test methods, and results presented by the author(s) are abstracted and entered into the database.

IRIS Database for Risk Assessment

IRIS is a database of human health effects that may result from exposure to various substances found in the environment. IRIS was initially developed for EPA staff in response to a growing demand for consistent information on chemical substances for use in risk assessments, decision-making and regulatory activities. The information in IRIS is intended for those without extensive training in toxicology, but with some knowledge of health sciences.

Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) - "toxicological profiles"

The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) produces "toxicological profiles" for hazardous substances found at National Priorities List (NPL) sites. These hazardous substances are ranked based on frequency of occurrence at NPL sites, toxicity, and potential for human exposure. Toxicological profiles are developed from a priority list of 275 substances. ATSDR also prepares toxicological profiles for the Department of Defense (DOD) and the Department of Energy (DOE) on substances related to federal sites.

NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards

The NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards (NPG) is intended as a source of general industrial hygiene information on several hundred chemicals/classes for workers, employers, and occupational health professionals. The NPG does not contain an analysis of all pertinent data; rather it presents key information and data in abbreviated or tabular form for chemicals or substance groupings (e.g. cyanides, fluorides, manganese compounds) that are found in the work environment. The information found in the NPG should help users recognize and control occupational chemical hazards.

International Chemical Safety Cards

International Chemical Safety Cards for various chemicals.

Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety (CCOHS)

CCOHS is Canada's national resource for the advancement of workplace health and safety.

Health Canada's Priority Substances Assessment Program (PSAP)

The Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999) requires the establishment of a Priority Substances List (PSL). Substances on this List are of priority for assessment to determine whether environmental exposure to them poses a risk to the health of Canadians or to the environment. A Priority Substance may be a chemical, a group of chemicals, effluents or wastes. There have been two PSLs; PSL1 (see First Priority Substances List Assessments) and PSL2 (see Second Priority Substances List Assessments), which were established by the Ministers of Health and of the Environment, based on the recommendations of a Ministers' Expert Advisory Panel. The responsibility for assessing Priority Substances is shared by Health Canada and Environment Canada. Health Canada assesses the risks to human health from environmental exposure to Priority Substances. Environment Canada assesses the risks to the environment and non-human organisms.

IPCS INCHEM

IPCS INCHEM is an invaluable tool for those concerned with chemical safety and the sound management of chemicals.

Produced through cooperation between the International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS) and the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety (CCOHS); IPCS INCHEM directly responds to one of the Intergovernmental Forum on Chemical Safety (IFCS) priority actions to consolidate current, internationally peer-reviewed chemical safety-related publications and database records from international bodies, for public access.

IPCS INCHEM offers quick and easy electronic access to thousands of searchable full-text documents on chemical risks and the sound management of chemicals, helping countries fulfill their commitments under UNCED's Agenda 21, Chapter 19.

The FAOSTAT Database:

  • Codex Alimentarius: Pesticide Residues In Food
  • Codex Alimentarius: Veterinary Drug Residues in Food

Maximum Residue Limits for Pesticide Residues in Food and Veterinary Drug Residues in Food

The Codex Alimentarius

The Codex Alimentarius Commission was created in 1963 by FAO and WHO to develop food standards, guidelines and related texts such as codes of practice under the Joint FAO/WHO Food Standards Programme. The main purposes of this Programme are protecting health of the consumers and ensuring fair trade practices in the food trade, and promoting coordination of all food standards work undertaken by international governmental and non-governmental organizations.

Australian Government of Health National Industrial Chemicals Notification and Assessment Scheme (NICNAS)

NICNAS is responsible for assessing the environmental and human health risks of chemicals for industrial use in Australia.

Note: information resources and links were accessed on October 6, 2015

Appendix 11: Information Resources - Microbiology

Canadian Departments/Agencies

Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

1. Animal pathogens

2. Plant Pests regulated by Canada

Environment Canada

3. Environment Canada and Health Canada. 2011. Framework for Science-Based Risk Assessment of Micro-Organisms Regulated under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999.

4. Environment Canada, Report EPS 1/RM/44. March 2004. Guidance document for testing the pathogenicity and toxicity of new microbial substances to aquatic and terrestrial organisms.

5. Environment Canada, Report EPS 1/RM/46. March 2005 (with june 2007 amendments). Guidance document on statistical Methods for Environmental Toxicity Tests.

6. Environment Canada. December 2013. Organisms on the Domestic Substances List (DSL) (Contains several risk group 2 microorganisms).

Health Canada/Public Health Agency of Canada

7. Human pathogen list: Chapter 2 of the Health Canada Laboratory Biosafety Guidelines provided a list of infectious agents by Risk Group. For questions about the Risk Group classification of specific organisms, please contact the Office of Laboratory Security.

8. Non-pathogenic organisms that do not require permit to import into Canada

International Resources

American Type Culture Collection (ATCC)

9. Cultures from the ATCC Bacteriology Collection

OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development)

10. OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development). 1998a. Principles of Good Laboratory Practice (as revised in 1997), No 1 - OECD Series on Principles of Good Laboratory Practice and Compliance Monitoring, ENV/MC/CHEM(98)17, 41 p., Environment Directorate, Paris, France.

11. OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development). 1999d. The application of the GLP principles to Short Term Studies, No 7 (revised) - OECD Series on Principles of Good Laboratory Practice and Compliance Monitoring, ENV/JM/MONO(99)23, 16 p., Environment Directorate, Paris, France.

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