What to consider before applying for a Safe Food for Canadians licence

Although the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR) came into force on January 15, 2019, other requirements will be introduced in 2020 and 2021 based on food commodity, type of activity and business size. For more information, refer to the SFCR timelines.

On this page

1.0 Introduction

The Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR) is now in force and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is transitioning to a new licensing system that grants licences to a person to conduct specific activities relating to food.

To find out if and when your business requires a licence, use the following information resources:

If you need a licence and you are ready to apply, review the information outlined in this document. It is will help you prepare for the application process.

2.0 If you have a pre-existing CFIA issued licence or registration (permission)

There are many food businesses that already held a valid permission issued by the CFIA, in the form of a registration or licence, before the SFCR came into force on January 15, 2019. These include those listed below, as previously issued under the authorities of these acts:

  • Canada Agricultural Products Act
    • Cheese import licence
    • Dairy establishment registration
    • Fresh fruit and vegetable registered produce warehouse
    • Honey establishment registration
    • Maple establishment registration
    • Processed Products establishment registration
  • Fish Inspection Act
    • Fish establishment registration
    • Fish import licence
  • Meat Inspection Act
    • Licence to operate a meat establishment

If you currently have one of these registrations or licences, you do not need to apply for a Safe Food for Canadians (SFC) licence at this time. The permission you have remains valid under the SFCR, provided it contains the following statement:

"This certificate is issued in accordance with the [name the Regulations]. This registration, licence, permit or authorization is also a licence that is issued under the Safe Food for Canadians Act upon its commencement day."

This means you can continue to operate with your pre-existing registration or licence and defer applying for a SFC licence until your existing permission expires.

You have the authority to conduct the range of activitiesFootnote 1 specified in the SFCR for any food commodity. However, if you choose to expand or change your business activities or foods, you must:

  • meet the relevant SFCR requirements associated with the new activities or foods,
    • such as preventive controls, traceability and labelling requirements
  • have a written preventive control plan that is updated to reflect these changes, and
  • comply with record keeping requirements.

    For example: If you have a pre-existing registration for a domestic establishment and you wish to begin manufacturing a new food, you would not need to apply immediately for a SFC licence. However, prior to manufacturing the new food, you would need to conduct a hazard analysis on the new food and address how all applicable risks will be controlled within your written preventive control plan. You would also need to meet all consumer protection (labelling, packaging, standards of identity, grades and net quantity) and traceability requirements, including maintaining documents in accordance with the SFCR. Failure to meet the regulatory requirements prior to adding a new activity or food to your business could result in enforcement action from the CFIA.

Your pre-existing registration or licence will become invalid before its expiry date if you change ownership or build (or move to) a new establishment. In these cases, you need to apply for a SFC licence regardless of when the pre-existing permission expires.

Once your pre-existing registration or licence approaches its expiry date, you will need to apply for a SFC licence in MyCFIA. If you have multiple registrations or licences, you can apply for your SFC licence to cover all your activities as soon as the first registration or licence expires. Any changes to the activities conducted at your establishment or the foods you produce will affect the type, frequency and extent of CFIA's oversight activities, such as inspections. The CFIA's oversight will be proportional to the risks that need to be managed.

Your pre-existing registration or licence numbers (as issued before January 15, 2019) will continue to be considered your unique establishment identification number and can continue to be used on labels, certificates and export eligibility lists.

3.0 If your business does not have a licence or registration

If your business does not have an existing permission and the timelines indicate that you need a licence by January 15, 2019, complete the following four steps.

Step 1: Create an account in My CFIA

The first step in preparing to apply for a Safe Food for Canadians licence is to visit My CFIA to create an account and business profile. The application for a new licence is available online at My CFIA.

Through My CFIA your business can request licences and export certificates, as well as set up electronic payments.

When enrolling in My CFIA, you can create one or more profiles for your business. Learn more about setting up your profile on our web page Before you sign up for My CFIA.

Step 2: Determine your licence structure

The SFCR does not limit the number of licences a person can hold. You can operate under a single licence or multiple licences, depending on what fits your business needs.

Before deciding how many licences to request in your application consider the following:

  • You have to pay a fee of $250 for each licence you request.
  • You have to prepare, keep, maintain and implement a preventive control plan to cover each licence you hold.
  • Many foreign trading partners require a unique identification number for each physical location or establishment where a food commodity is prepared. To access these foreign markets, your licence should only be associated to one establishment if you:
    • prepare food for export
    • export food and need a certificate
    • wish to be on an export eligibility list
  • If you choose to have more than one licence at a particular physical location or establishment, there cannot be any overlap in the food categories and activities covered by those licences.
  • The CFIA may conduct inspections on each licence you hold. If a CFIA enforcement action, such as suspension or cancellation, is taken on your licence, this will impact all activities and foods covered by that licence. A CFIA finding of non-compliance or enforcement action on one licence could result in follow up inspections under other licences you may have.

Find out more by watching our videos on single or multiple profiles and applying for a licence.

Examples of different licence structures are provided below. Other structures may be considered.

Example A: One licence to cover all activities and food commodities occurring at one establishment. Therefore, if you operate several establishments at different physical locations, you obtain a licence for each physical location.

Note: This structure is recommended.

Example B: One licence for each activityFootnote 2 (refer to Annex B) you conduct.

  • You obtain a licence for each activity, which could result in multiple licences for one establishment.

Note: This structure is not advisable if you export food.

Example C: One licence to cover all activities you conduct in a certain food category. Therefore you could have multiple licences if you conduct activities on a variety of different food categories.

  • Refer to Annex A for a preview of the food categories you need to choose from when completing the licence application.

Note: This structure is not advisable if you export food.

Step 3: Complete the licence application

Now that you are ready to apply for the licence, you will need to make sure you have all the necessary details of your business. When filling out the application for each licence, you will have to do all of the following:

  • indicate the activities for which a licence is being sought
    • Refer to Annex B for a preview of the activities that will be listed on the application.
  • identify the location(s) of establishment(s) where the activities will be conducted
    • Note: for the activities of import and export, establishment information is not required
  • indicate the food category for which a licence is being sought, the activities conducted and the establishment where the activity will take place
  • attest that you meet the applicable requirements of the SFCR, including preventive controls and having a written preventive control plan (if required)
  • attest that the information provided in the application is complete, truthful, and not misleading

You can find the online application in your My CFIA account, under the Service Request tab.

Keep in Mind

You will need an approved work shift agreement for activities relating to meat products and slaughtering food animals.

Slaughter of food animals and the production of their derived meat products are activities that inherently carry more risk. Because of this, they require regular or sustained oversight.

If you conduct these activities, you must have inspection services and a work shift agreement with the CFIA in order to qualify for an SFCR licence. The document Regulatory Requirement: Inspection services for Food Animals and Meat Products provides an overview of the regulatory requirements on work shifts, inspection stations and minimum number hours of inspection.

Step 4: Receive your licence

After you submit your completed online application and payment, you will receive an electronic message indicating one of the following:

  • a) your licence has been issued and is available in your My CFIA account, or
  • b) your licence will be issued once the CFIA has inspected the business.

In the case of option b), some new establishments may have to be inspected before an SFCR licence can be issued.

  • The CFIA will use a risk-based approach to inspecting new businesses that apply for a licence.
  • A variety of risk factors will be used to prioritize and manage these inspection activities.
  • The CFIA may have to inspect licence holders requesting an export certificate or other export permission, regardless of their risk profile, if it is a requirement of the importing country.

4.0 Amending a licence

Once you have a licence, it is important to remember that it covers the activity, location and food category you have entered in your application, as indicated on the licence. Any time this information changes, an amendment to your licence is required.

For example, if you want to conduct activities in a new food category, you are required to have that new food commodity added to the scope of your licence. You can do that through a request for an amendment. Such a request can be made online and is not subject to any fee.
Refer to Regulatory Requirements: Licensing for more information, including section 4.0 Conditions for the issuance, renewal or amendment of a licence.

5.0 Additional information

Refer to CFIA Licensing for more information on this topic. If you have questions, contact us or call 1-800-442-2342.

Annex A – Food categories identified in the licence application

When applying for a Safe Food for Canadians (SFC) licence, you will be asked to identify the foods you are responsible for by choosing from a list of food commodities and sub-commodities. It is important to select the correct food commodity and sub-commodity so that your licence accurately reflects your business. Examples of foods that fall within each of these commodities are explained in the tables below. You do not need to select categories to cover the ingredients you use in your products. For example, you would not select "eggs" or "dairy" to cover the ingredients used in your "cream filled doughnuts".

The commodity and sub-commodity titles found in the SFC licence application do not use the same definitions found within the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In most cases, these categories are broader than the SFCR definitions and standards of identity.

Commodity: Dairy

Select this box if the food you are responsible for is milk, derived from milk or contains milk based fats. Milk, milk derivatives, and milk fats can be derived from cows, buffalos, goats, sheep or camels.

Do not select this box if the food you are responsible for includes vegan dairy substitutes for dairy products that do not contain dairy ingredients, such as soy or almond beverages. For these products, select the "Manufactured foods" category.

Dairy sub-commodities

The sub-commodities identified in the dairy commodity can also include milk products that are dried, cultured, condensed, or frozen.

Composite dairy products include dairy products that are mixed with other foods, but still recognized by the consumer as a dairy product.

Dairy substitutes may be used by the consumer in place of dairy products but contain ingredients derived from dairy products (for example, caseinates).

Dairy drinks are a category of dairy based beverages, such as flavoured milk, smoothies and egg nog.

Examples of dairy sub-commodities
Sub-commodity Examples
Butter/butterfat cultured butter, ghee, salted butter, unsalted butter, light butter, whey butter
By-products whey, casein, caseinates
Cheese creamed, hard, processed and soft cheeses such as cheddar, creamed cheese, mozzarella, paneer and their products (such as crumbled, shredded, sliced)
Composite dairy products dairy products mixed with other food commodities, such as fruits or vegetables, that are recognized as a dairy product (such as onion and garlic cream cheese, smoked salmon flavoured cream cheese), cranberry goat cheese, cheese balls or logs containing nuts or fruits
Cultured dairy products crème fraîche, kefir, sour cream (includes flavoured sour cream), yoghurt (with or without fruit or other toppings)
Dairy drinks chocolate milk, strawberry milk, iced coffee, milkshakes, smoothies, yoghurt drink, egg nog, buttermilk
Dried milk powder skim-milk powder, buttermilk powder
Evaporated/condensed products 2%, whole evaporated milk, sweetened condensed milk
Frozen dairy/novelties ice-cream, frozen yoghurt, ice cream cakes, frozen dairy dessert, sherbet, gelato
Milk/cream whole milk, 2% milk, 1% milk, skim milk, 10% cream, half and half, whipping cream
Dairy substitutes dairy spreads, coffee whitener

Commodity: Egg

Select this box if the foods you are responsible for include shell eggs, processed eggs or composite egg products.

While the majority of eggs and egg products in Canada are from domestic chickens (Gallus domesticus) and domestic turkeys (Melagris gallopavo), this category also includes eggs from other species, such as duck or quail eggs.

Do not select this box if the food you are responsible for includes Balut, which is a fertilized duck egg. For this product select the "Manufactured food" category.

Egg sub-commodities

Shell egg is the sub-commodity used for egg products that are still in their shell. These eggs may be pasteurized.

Processed egg products can be in dried, pickled, frozen or liquid form, cooked or uncooked. Processed egg products can be made of the whole egg, or the separate egg yolk and egg white components and may or may not contain other ingredients.

Composite egg products are foods that contain eggs and a variety of other ingredients, but are commonly recognized by consumers as a food that is egg-based.

Examples of egg sub-commodities
Sub-commodity Examples
Composite egg products eggs mixed with other commodities (such as dairy and vegetables) and recognized as an egg product such as frozen breakfast egg sandwiches, egg salad, egg salad mixed with potatoes and vegetables, omelette mix, quiche, egg patties
Processed eggs dried, frozen, liquid eggs (whole eggs, egg whites and egg yolks), hard boiled eggs, pickled eggs
Shell eggs graded eggs and eggs pasteurized in shell

Commodity: Fish and seafood

Select this box if the food you are responsible for is a fish or seafood or any marine mammals, amphibians or reptiles.

Fish and seafood sub-commodities

Chordates is a sub-commodity used for sharks, skates (rays) and their by-products.

Finfish is a sub-commodity that also includes non-finfish species, such as cuttlefish, octopus and squid.

Foods derived from amphibians, reptiles, and marine mammals, including their by-products, are included in these two sub-categories.

Composite fish and seafood products include a wide variety of foods that contain fish or seafood products mixed with other foods but are commonly recognized by consumers as a food that is fish or seafood based.

Examples of fish and seafood sub-commodities
Sub-commodity Examples
Amphibians (and reptiles) alligators, crocodiles, frogs, snakes any of their parts and products
Chordates sharks, skates (rays), any of their parts, products and by-products
Composite fish and seafood products fish and seafood products mixed with other food commodities (such as dairy, vegetables and grain products) and recognized as a fish product such as shrimp rolls, shrimp spring rolls, sushi rolls, fish cakes, seafood lasagna, shrimp pad thai, lobster mac and cheese, seafood chowder, fish sauce, seafood or fish stuffing
Crustaceans lobsters, crabs, shrimp, crayfish, crawfish, rock lobsters, scampi, any of their parts, products and by-products such as cooked whole lobster, cooked crabmeat, cooked lobster claws, cooked shrimp, canned crabmeat, lobster cocktail, lobster tomalley, lobster paste, breaded shrimp, shrimp cocktail, barnacles
Echinoderms  sea urchins and sea cucumbers, any of their parts, products and by-products
Finfish ground fish and flat fish such as anchovy, basa, catfish, cod, croaker, eels, flounder, gourami, haddock, halibut, hake, herring, kingfish, mackerel, mudfish, mullet, perch, pickerel, pike, pollock, rockfish, salmon, sardine, scad, seabass, seabream, smelt, snapper, sole, sturgeon, tilapia, trout, tuna, turbot, wahoo, walleye and whiting
finfish products and by-products such as caviar, fish eggs, fish sticks, kamaboko, minced fish, smoked salmon and surimi
this category also includes fish that don't have fins such as cuttlefish, octopus, squid, any of their parts
Gastropods abalone, conches, loco, periwinkles, snails, whelks, any of their parts and products
Marine mammals seals, whales, any of their parts, products and by-products (such as seal oil)
Bivalve molluscs clams, cockles, geoducks, mussels, oysters, scallops, any of their parts, products and by-products such as breaded scallops, canned baby clams, canned oysters, cooked mussels, frozen scallop meat

Commodity: Fresh fruits and vegetables

Select this box if the food you are responsible for includes fresh fruits or vegetables that are whole, washed, sliced, peeled, grated or cut.

It is important to distinguish this category from the "Processed Fruits or Vegetables" category. Generally, a fruit or vegetable is considered "fresh" and not "processed" if it can degrade or rot during storage (dry storage or refrigerated).

Do not select this box if the food you are responsible for includes dried herbs. For this product select the "Manufactured Foods" category.

Do not select this box if the food you are responsible for includes fruits or vegetables that have been further processed. For this product select the "Processed fruits or vegetables" category.

Examples of fresh fruits or vegetables sub-commodities
Sub-commodity Examples
Fresh fruits whole, washed, sliced, cored, peeled, grated, chopped or cut fresh fruits such as apples, bananas, berries, citrus, melons, pineapples, rhubarb, peaches and plums, fresh fruit products (such as fresh fruit salad)
Fresh vegetables whole, washed, sliced, peeled, grated or cut broccoli, cauliflower, fresh herbs, leafy vegetables (such as bok choy, brussel sprouts, cabbage, lettuce, rapini, spinach), mushrooms, root vegetables (such as garlic, ginger, onion, carrots, potatoes, sweet potatoes, turnips), sprouts and fresh vegetable products (such as prepared salads and salad kits)

Commodity: Honey and honey products

Select this box if the food you are responsible is honey or honey products. All honey and honey products fall under this single commodity box. These foods may or may not be subject to standards of identity or grades set out in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations and Food and Drug Regulations.

The foods found in the honey sub-commodities may contain other ingredients but are still recognized by the consumer as a honey product.

Examples of honey and honey products sub-commodities
Sub-commodity Examples
Honey and honey products liquid raw or pasteurized honey, whipped honey spread, honey in the comb

Commodity: Manufactured foods

Select this box if the food you are responsible for is an alcoholic beverage, non-alcoholic beverage, confectionary, sweeteners, snack food, fats, oils, food chemical, a food derived from grains, infant food, nuts, seeds, spices, herbs, seasoning or condiment.

Manufactured foods sub-commodities

Alcoholic beverage is the sub-commodity used for all beverages that contain more than 0.5% absolute ethyl alcohol by volume. Mixed alcoholic beverages, aperitifs and liqueurs are included in this category.

Confectionary, sweeteners, snack foods and non-bakery desserts is a sub-commodity that includes a wide variety of foods. This sub-commodity is used for candies, sweets, and gum. It includes sweeteners like sugar, molasses and corn syrup and non-dairy based iced novelties such as popsicles and freezies. Snack foods include potato chips and corn chips. Desserts included in this category are sugar-based desserts.

Do not select this box for grain-based desserts. Grain-based desserts are part of the "Grain derived foods" category.

Fats and oils derived from plants are found in this sub-commodity category.

Do not select this box for animal based fats and oils (rendered fat, suet, lard/shortening, tallow, etc). Animal based fats are found in the Meat and poultry products commodity list.

Food chemicals are often used as food ingredients; they are not typically consumed on their own. This category includes food chemicals used for vitamins, minerals, artificial sweeteners, food additives and many other uses. Food additives are considered to be those listed on Health Canada's Lists of permitted food additives. Please note this category does not include stand-alone vitamin or mineral supplements such as those sold in pill form, but rather those vitamins and minerals produced as ingredients or additives to food.

"Foods not otherwise listed" is the sub-commodity used for foods that cannot be categorized into the other sub-commodities listed under "Manufactured foods". It includes foods made from insects, such as cricket flour, dried mealworms and roasted crickets. Foods such as collagen casings, gelatins, and balut are in this sub-commodity.

Grain derived foods is a category used for foods that are made from processed grains, such as wheat, rice, oats, barley or corn. Foods made from processed grains include a wide variety of pastas, cereals, and breads, as well as a variety of grain-based desserts such as cakes, cookies, pastries, pies and muffins.

Infant foods include infant formula (either dairy-based formula, or non-dairy based formula), such as ready to serve liquid formulas, concentrated liquid formulas, or powdered formula products that can be blended with water and/or milk before consumption.

Do not select this box for foods for infants that consist of other commodity groups.

For example:

  • foods for infants consisting of grains or cereals select the "Grain-based foods" sub-commodity
  • foods for infants consisting of meat and other ingredients select the "Meat and poultry products" commodity and "Composite meat products"
  • foods for infants consisting of pureed vegetables select the "Processed fruits or vegetables" commodity and the "Processed vegetables" sub-commodity.

Multiple foods is the sub-commodity that contains food made from multiple commodities, such as vegetarian pizza or sandwiches that do not contain meat. This sub-commodity also includes foods used in liquid diets, meal replacements, protein drinks and nutritional supplements.

Do not select this box for foods that contain more than 2% meat ingredients. For foods containing a significant quantity of meat ingredients select the "Composite meat products" category.

Do not select this box for natural health products. Natural health products are not subject to the SFCR.

Non-alcoholic beverages include a wide variety of drinks. These beverages can be made from soy, coconuts, coffee, or tea. It also includes dry powders or liquid flavour concentrates that are intended to be added to liquid to make a non-alcoholic beverage. This sub-commodity also includes soft drinks, carbonated drinks, and water (including flavoured water).

Do not select this box for non-alcoholic beverages made from fruits or vegetables, such as juice, concentrated juice, or frozen concentrated juice. These foods can be found in the "Processed fruits or vegetables" category.

Nuts, grains, seeds can be raw, roasted, seasoned, or smoked. This sub-commodity also includes foods made from processing nuts, grains or seeds into other products, such as nut butters, ground seeds, or vegan substitutes.

Spices, herbs, flavours, condiments, dressings is the sub-commodity for foods that are typically used to complement, season or add flavour to another food. They can be used as an ingredient in a food, added after a food is prepared, or used to accompany a food (for example, in a sauce). Spices are typically derived from flowers, seeds, fruits, roots, bark or nuts of a plant. Herbs are the dried leaves of herbaceous plants.

Do not select this box for fresh herbs. For these foods use the "Fresh fruits or vegetables" category.

Do not select this box for ketchup, chutneys and other diced or pureed fruits and vegetables. For these products use the "Processed fruits or vegetables" category.

Vegan dairy substitutes is the sub-commodity for foods which are suitable for a vegan diet. These foods do not contain dairy products or dairy derivatives, such as soy cheeses and coconut yogurt.

Examples of manufactured foods sub-commodities
Sub-commodity Examples
Alcoholic beverages aperitifs, beer, ciders, liqueurs, pre-mixed drinks, spirits, wine (fortified grape or non-grape)
Confectionary, sweeteners, snack foods (containing or not containing nuts), non-bakery desserts candies, chocolates (such as cocoa powder), cake decorations, marshmallows, corn syrup, birch syrup, table syrup, gum, molasses, sugar, sweets, dried coconut (sweetened or unsweetened), popcorn, gelatin desserts, custard (including dry mix), frosting, popsicles, freezies, potato chips, corn chips, pudding (including dry mix)
Fats and oils fats and oils obtained from plants, such as avocado oil, canola oil, coconut oil, corn oil, flaxseed oil, grapeseed oil, olive oil, peanut oil, sesame oil, soybean oil, sunflower oil, vegetable oil, margarine, vegetable shortening
Food chemicals amino acids, vitamins, minerals, flavour enhancers, food additives (such as anticaking agents, artificial sweeteners, colouring agents, dough conditioning agents, emulsifying agents, firming agents, food enzymes, glazing agents, pH adjusting agents, preservatives, sequestering agents), food grade alcohol, malt extract, baking soda, baking powder
Foods not otherwise listed cricket flour, dried mealworms, roasted crickets, balut, collagen casings, seaweeds and algae, yeast, ice, granita, konjac noodles
Grain derived foods barley flour, breads, bread products (chapatti, bagels, rusks), cakes, cereal, pasta (fresh, frozen or dried), cookies, croissants, doughnuts, dried grains, instant oats, millet, muffins, rice, wheat germ, tart or pie shells, pastries, alimentary paste, corn starch, pitas, tortillas, pizza shells, pizza crusts, cake mixes
Infant foods ready to serve liquid formulas, concentrated liquid formulas, powdered liquid formula products
Multiple Foods nutritional supplements, protein drinks, sports nutrition, prepared vegetarian meals, sandwiches, formulated liquid diets, meal replacements, vegetarian pizza (frozen or refrigerated), perogies, vegetarian samosas, vegetable soups
Non-alcoholic beverages carbonated beverages, flavoured water, coffee, tea, kombucha, coconut water, soy beverages, soft drinks, drink powders or liquid fruit flavour concentrates for making drinks
Nuts, grains, seeds raw, roasted, salted, smoked nuts such as almonds, cashews, hazelnuts, peanuts, pecans, pistachios, walnuts and their products (such as peanut butter, almond butter, almond milk, tree nut butters
seeds such as chia seeds, flaxseeds, sunflower seeds, hemp seeds, quinoa, sesame seeds and their products (such as ground flax seeds, soy nut butter, sunflower seed butter), tahini, tofu, vegan cheese made from cashews, dried lentils
Spices, herbs, flavours, condiments, dressings dried herbs, gravy, mayonnaise, mustard, salad dressing, soya sauce, spices, salt, pepper, Worcestershire sauce, vinegar, savoury spreads made from yeast extract
Vegan dairy substitutes coconut yogurt, soy cheese, hemp protein

Commodity: Maple and maple products

Select this box if the food you are responsible is maple and maple products. All maple and maple products are within this single commodity box. These foods may or may not be subject to standards of identity or grades set out in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations and Food and Drug Regulations.

The foods found in the maple sub-commodity may contain other ingredients but are still recognized by the consumer as a maple product.

Do not select this box for foods made from other tree species, such as birch syrup. For these products select the "Manufactured foods" commodity, "Confectionary, sweeteners, snack foods, and non-bakery desserts" sub-commodity category.

Examples of maple and maple products sub-commodities
Food sub-commodity Examples
Maple and maple Products maple syrup, maple sugar, maple butter, maple candy, maple taffy

Commodity: Meat and poultry products

Select this box if the food you are responsible for is derived from a food animal.

Do not select this box for foods derived from marine mammals, amphibians or reptiles. For these products, you should select the "Fish and seafood" category.

Meat and poultry products sub-commodities

There are several sub-commodities of food animals which are based on the wide variety of domesticated animals and game animals used as food. The various meat and poultry sub-commodities include the meat derived from the animals associated with that sub-commodity, as well as any of their parts or products. This means that the meat and poultry products can be a variety of cuts, ground meat, marinated meat, or further processed into luncheon meat, sausage, broths, animal fats and oils (such as lard/shortening, tallow), meat flavours and extracts, and meat gravies and flavours.

Composite meat products include foods that are mixed with other ingredients. These foods are made up of more than 2% meat ingredients, which may trigger SFCR requirements that would not otherwise apply to the food, such as a work shift agreement.

Game animals are hunted, wild animals, for which permission is granted by a competent authority to hunt the animal for commercial use.

Farmed game animals and farmed game birds are food animals that are historically considered "wild" but have been raised for food production and transported to an abattoir for traditional slaughter with stunning.

Examples of meat and poultry products sub-commodities
Sub-commodity Examples
Bovine (Beef, bison and veal) beef, bison and veal or any of their parts such as chops, ground meat, organs, roasts and products such as broth, corned beef, lunch meat, meatballs, sausage
Caprine (Goat) goat, any of its parts such as ground meat, roasts and its products such as marinated meat, sausages
Cervidae farmed elk, deer, any of their parts and products
Composite meat products containing a non-meat animal origin ingredient foods containing more than 2% meat (calculated on the basis of the cooked weight of the product) mixed with other food commodities such as vegetables and grain products.
meat pies (tourtière), meat spaghetti sauce, beef stews, meat pizza (frozen or refrigerated), chicken lasagna, frozen meals containing meat,
Equine horses, asses, mules, any of their parts (such as ground meat, steaks, roasts) and products (such as marinated meat, sausages)
Farmed Game farm raised game animals, such as bison, musk ox, elk, reindeer, caribou, antelope, deer, any of their parts and products
Farmed Game Bird farm raised game birds, such as partridge, pheasant, pigeon (squab), quail, any of their parts and products
Game hunted wild game animals, such as caribou, musk ox, reindeer, any of their parts and products
Ovine (Sheep, lamb and mutton) sheep, lamb and mutton, any of its parts (such as ground meat, lamb chops, rack of lamb, roasts) and its products (such as marinated meat, sausages)
Porcine (Pork) any of its parts (such as chops, ground meat, ribs, roasts) and its products (such as bacon, creton, cured/dried sausage, ham, headcheese, hotdogs, and sausage), pork rinds
Poultry chicken, cornish hen, duck, goose, guinea fowl, turkey, any of their parts (such as breast, legs, liver) and their products such as breaded chicken strips, broth, meatballs, pâté, sausage, smoked breast
Rabbit rabbit, hare, any of its parts and products
Ratites emu, ostrich, rhea, any of their parts and products

Commodity: Processed fruits and vegetables

Select this box if the food you are responsible for is made from a fruit or vegetable that has been processed to create a refrigerated, frozen or shelf stable food. The processes applied to these foods most often are (but not limited to): cooking, freezing, drying, pickling, canning (hermitically sealed package), pureeing, or juicing.

Processed fruits and vegetables sub-commodities

The foods found in the processed fruits or processed vegetable sub-commodities may contain a variety of other ingredients and may or may not be subject to standards of identity or grades set out in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations and Food and Drug Regulations. Many of these foods were previously regulated by the Processed Products Regulations; however, similar foods made by processing fruits or vegetables that fell outside these former Regulations are included within this commodity group now.

Examples of processed fruits and vegetables sub-commodities
Sub-commodity Examples
Processed fruits apple sauce, fruits packed in hermetically sealed packages (such as cherries, fruit cocktail, fruit salad, fruit cups, peaches, pears, plums, sliced apples, strawberries), frozen fruits, sorbet, fruit juice, concentrated fruit juice, fruit juice from concentrate, and frozen concentrated fruit juice, fruit nectars, jams, jellies, fruit spread, fruit pie filling, fruit peel, marmalade, minced meat, dried fruits, fruit leathers
Processed vegetables vegetables packed in hermetically sealed packages (such as asparagus, beans, bean sprouts, beans with pork, beets, carrots, corn, cream style onions, creamed mushrooms, green beans, peas, potatoes, ketchup, legumes, lima beans, mixed vegetables, mushrooms, pumpkin, squash, sauerkraut, spinach, sweet potatoes, tomato (crushed, diced, paste, pulp, puree, sauce, stewed), chickpeas, lentils, and wax beans), frozen vegetables (such as peas, mushrooms, onions, spinach, squash, vegetable mixes/blends), french-fried potatoes, vegetable juices, vegetable juice from concentrate, concentrated vegetable juice, chutney, horseradish, sauerkraut, olives, pickles (fresh or fermented), relishes, dried vegetables

Annex B – SFCR licensable activities

Domestic activities

  • Storing and handling imported meat products for the purpose of inspection
  • Slaughter of food animals for inter-provincial trade
  • Slaughter of food animals for export
  • Preparing food for inter-provincial trade
  • Preparing food for intra-provincial trade where provincial regulations require a federal licence
  • Preparing food for export

International activities

  • Importing food
  • Exporting food
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