Annex C: HACCP Based Slaughter Inspection Program (HIP) for Swine

This page is part of the Guidance Document Repository (GDR).

Looking for related documents?
Search for related documents in the Guidance Document Repository

Table of Contents

1.0 Definitions

Acceptance Quality Limit (AQL)
A percentage value assigned to the level of undetected defects that are present in a production lot based on a statistical method of analysis.
Corrective Action
Action(s) taken by the operator to return conditions to normal.
Correlation Testing
Simultaneous product performance testing conducted jointly but independently by the CFIA and the plant operator to determine if results are being scored and recorded with similar interpretation. These may be randomly scheduled or unscheduled tests initiated by the CFIA.
Defect / Attribute
A defined set of food safety and other carcass defect conditions which occur on the carcass or its portions as a result of manufacturing conditions or practices during the live handling, slaughtering, and/or dressing operations, or which occurs as a disease process in the live animal.
Delegate
HIP certified CFIA Inspector (VM or EG) who performs duties and takes action on behalf of the Veterinarian in Charge (VIC) in accordance with his/her written instructions.
Final Carcass Approval Area
The area between the CFIA carcass inspection station and the held rail return switch to the main line where all carcasses receive CFIA final assessment and are released as approved carcasses.
Finished Product Standards (FPS)
A defined level of food safety and other carcass defects including manufacturing and/or pathological defects that a carcass or its portions shall be free of in order to comply with the standard.
Food Safety Defects: Category I (FS I)
Any visible spillage of gastro-intestinal contents or milk onto the exposed surfaces of the carcass.
Food Safety Defects: Category II (FS II)
Any visible condition on a carcass that is associated with a pathological disease condition.
ISO
The International Organization for Standardization and its associated Quality Assurance rules, standards and sampling plans.
Line Speed
The continuous movement of carcass locations to ensure empty locations are counted along the main carcass rail is stated as the gross uninterrupted speed calculated over a 60 minutes period past a fixed point and shall not be calculated on the net number of carcasses dressed per hour.
Lot
A defined period of product manufacturing limited to either ½ hour or 1 hour.
Other Carcass (OC) Defects
Those defects that may appear on a carcass that do not pose an immediate or direct food safety risk to the consumer but do fail to meet acceptable criteria for food wholesomeness, suitability and/or regulatory standards.
Process Action
A course of action(s) which identifies and corrects non conformities at one or more locations in a process such that the product(s), process(es), procedure(s) or condition(s) are returned to minimum standards of compliance.
Retest
A test that is repeated one or more times on the same sample set.
Rework
The reprocessing of an identified production lot/sample set or product unit to correct the condition(s) causing the non-conformance(s) such that all affected product conforms to prescribed minimum standards when the reprocessing is complete.
Sample Set
A statistically determined number of production units that are randomly selected from a defined population and used to represent the overall performance characteristics of that group.
Sampling Plan (ISO 2859-1)
A standardized table prescribing specific sample sizes or sets that may be used to statistically evaluate product performance over a defined period of manufacturing activity.
Statistical Process Control (SPC)
A statistical quality assurance tool used to evaluate and control one or more process steps during the manufacturing procedure.
Zero Tolerance Defect
An unacceptable pathological defect or manufacturing defect for which there is no prescribed tolerance.

2.0 Introduction to the HIP

2.1 Introduction

This policy stipulates that every operator of a swine slaughter establishment must perform tests to verify that the presentation of carcasses and viscera to the CFIA for post-mortem inspection meets the prescribed performance requirements. However, operators who determine that it is not feasible to make all of the necessary modifications to allow for presentation tests in accordance with the current policy have the option of proposing alternative approaches to replace part or all of the HIP presentation tests.

2.2 Scope and Guiding Principles

The guiding principles that were examined and adopted for this policy are the:

  • enhancement of the safety and suitability of meat and meat products;
  • improvement of the effectiveness and uniformity of inspection programs;
  • re-allocation of inspection resources based on risk;
  • assumption of greater responsibility by industry for their products at all levels of food animal production and processing; and
  • assurance of international trade compatibility with the World Trade Organization (WTO), World Health Organization (WHO), World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), Codex Alimentarius principles and specific trading partner requirements.

The redesign of the Canadian red meat inspection program under a HIP is limited to the following proposed areas:

  • mandatory screening information on all food animals submitted for slaughter;
  • transportation, live receiving and handling;
  • slaughter processing; and
  • carcass chilling.

The HIP will result in a more comprehensive inspection program whereby the CFIA and the registered establishment operator jointly assume new roles of responsibility.

The HIP policy is designed to blend the complementary principles of Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) and Acceptance Quality Limits (AQL) of performance. By implementing the seven principles of HACCP in conjunction with specific process control steps that have a pre-defined level of performance, it has been shown that a consistently safer and more suitable meat product can be produced. Process control steps for live animal receiving, evisceration performance, portion presentation performance, and visible dressed carcass defect performance provide excellent controls for strategic and preventative intervention along the processing line.

National performance standards will be determined for the maximum acceptable allowance of visible food safety carcass defects as well as other carcass defects that may be present on an approved carcass as it leaves the evisceration floor. A national performance standard for specific microbial pathogens and other indicator organisms reflecting sanitary manufacturing procedures is also being developed.

2.3 Alternate Procedures/Approaches

Operators can propose alternate procedures/approaches to the different elements presented in this policy. Alternate procedures/approaches must meet or exceed the procedures, standards and outcomes as the procedure it is intended to replace. Alternate procedures must be submitted by the operator to the Veterinarian in-Charge, who will consult with the Operational guidance and expertise specialists. The alternate approach will be evaluated in collaboration with National Program Specialists. The alternate procedure cannot be used prior to a no objection by the CFIA. Operators should be advised that issuance of an opinion will depend on the quality and completeness of the information submitted to the CFIA. Additionally, note that evaluation of any new procedure may take some times as it may have significant impact on trade and require specific CFIA Operational adjustment (e.g. training of local inspection staff).

3.0 General Responsibilities in a HIP Establishment

As noted in section 2.2, operators of federally registered establishments and the CFIA assume additional responsibilities under the HIP. General responsibilities in a HIP establishment are outlined in this section.

3.1 Operator Responsibilities

The operator of an establishment operating under the HIP shall:

  • design, implement and monitor a written Quality Assurance (QA) program which reflects all HIP requirements. This program shall be approved by the VIC;
  • design, implement and maintain a written employee HIP training and accreditation program. This program shall be reviewed by the VIC;
  • assign accredited personnel to perform the monitoring activities under the HIP and implement corrective measures as required. The immediate supervisor(s) of accredited Plant Monitors, Detectors, and Trimmers must also be accredited;
  • assign only HIP-accredited personnel to perform the production activities and positions that require accreditation under the HIP. The accredited plant employees shall not be distracted by additional responsibilities that would prevent them from otherwise satisfactorily performing the accredited functions of their position;
  • train plant employees in the proper presentation of carcasses and their parts for post-mortem examination and inspection; and
  • ensure all HIP test records are available to CFIA inspection staff.

All product preparation, presentation and handling shall conform to the requirements of Chapter 17 of the Meat Hygiene Manual of Procedures (MOP).

3.2 Plant Personnel Training

An important part of the success of the HIP is the training and accreditation of key plant personnel. The operator has full responsibility for the training, evaluation (testing for proficiency), and re-training of accredited company employees as per CFIA HIP training program criteria. The positions for which CFIA accreditation is required are Plant Trainers (normally QA staff and Supervisors). All other plant staff occupying HIP related positions shall be trained by the accredited Plant Trainers. Detector/Trimmers and process control monitors shall be accredited under the operator's HIP training program. The initial group of Plant Trainers will be trained and accredited by CFIA HIP certified staff. Subsequent training of Plant Trainers shall be done by accredited Plant Trainers. The final accreditation of these Plant Trainees shall be performed by the CFIA. Accreditation requires successful completion of both a theoretical classroom session and a practical evaluation. All subsequent training of new plant staff will be performed by accredited Plant Trainers using the establishment's HIP training program. Thereafter, the VIC/delegate will only monitor the training of plant personnel along with the plant's written program to ensure sufficient training standards are being maintained.

A written plant HIP training program for each accredited position shall be maintained on file, be signed off by a responsible company officer, and include the training and testing procedures for each accredited position. HIP training records that demonstrate the training, evaluation and accreditation of each employee shall also be maintained on file by the operator. The VIC shall review the operator's HIP training program annually to ensure that it is current and complete. This review shall also include an examination of the accredited employee HIP training records. The company's current written training program and roster of accredited plant employees shall be made available to the VIC upon request.

Any accredited employee not exposed to the application and/or practices of the HIP for one year must be reassessed for proficiency in the HIP in order to maintain their accreditation. If necessary, the employee will be required to undergo a refresher training course under the direction of an accredited Plant Trainer. The plant QA department shall be responsible for monitoring and maintaining the accredited status of their employees.

The VIC has the right to remove the accreditation of any plant employee if factual information shows the individual does not perform his or her duties at the required standard as described in this policy and/or the operator's written training program. A protocol describing the process of accreditation removal and retraining must be included in the establishment's HIP written program.

3.2.1 Plant Trainers

Plant Trainers are establishment personnel who have been accredited after successfully demonstrating their heoretical and practical understanding of the entire HIP training program. They must also have an understanding of the specific functions performed by every plant accredited employee. Plant Trainers are usually production Supervisors or QA personnel who are responsible for developing the facility's written HIP training program and/or conducting the training sessions to accredit plant employees.

3.2.2 Defect Detectors and Trimmers

For further explanation of Operator Managed Conditions (OMC) and CFIA-Operator Managed Conditions (CFIA-OMC), refer to section 17.7, Chapter 17 of the MOP.

It is the responsibility of the plant carcass defect detector to identify all defective conditions referred to as OMC and to decide if the carcass is to be railed out for trimming or the defective condition will be corrected online. Carcass defect detectors shall use an in-plant marking system approved by the VIC to identify all OMC defects.

Carcass defect trimmers shall remove conditions identified as OMC and/or CFIA-OMC either online or on the operator held rail. No carcass shall leave the final carcass approval area until all defects and their associated tagging/identification marks have been removed by the carcass trimmers.

Under certain conditions, it is acceptable for one accredited plant employee to simultaneously perform the functions of defect detection and trimming. However, it may not be possible at higher line speeds for one person to identify, mark and trim carcasses. If it is determined by the VIC and Regional Veterinary Officer (RVO) that a plant employee cannot perform these multiple tasks effectively, the carcass defect detector shall only identify and mark OMC defects and one or more accredited trimmers shall be in place to effectively perform the sanitary removal of the identified defects.

No trimming of pathological conditions shall be performed on CFIA held carcasses until after CFIA veterinary disposition. Additionally, CFIA held tags shall only be removed after trimming and at the direction of a CFIA veterinarian/delegate.

3.2.3 Plant Process Control Monitors

Plant process control monitors shall be accredited company employees who perform Evisceration testing, Presentation testing, Finished Product Standards testing, and Rework Verification testing. These monitors shall be proficient in the detection, scoring, recording and process action activities associated with the process controls for which they are accredited and in accordance with the HIP.

3.3 CFIA Responsibilities

The application of the HIP policy must at all times remain in conformity with the Meat Inspection Act (MIA), Meat Inspection Regulations, 1990 (MIR) and the MOP. Unresolved differences in the interpretation of the application of the HIP policy between CFIA personnel and the operator may be referred to Operational Guidance and Expertise for written clarification.

Pending a decision from CFIA headquarters, the decision of the VIC/RVO shall prevail.

The CFIA reserves the right to take necessary regulatory corrective action when it is determined by the VIC/delegate or other responsible regulatory officer that the establishment has failed to properly and reasonably apply the requirements of the HIP.

All post-mortem inspection station activities remain a CFIA responsibility. Except where noted in this policy, post-mortem activities are performed as described in section 17.7, Chapter 17 of the MOP. CFIA inspectors working online shall be responsible for identifying specified pathological conditions which affect a part of or the entire carcass. The consistent presentation of portions or carcasses should result in a notable reduction in the manipulation of portions and in the number of required inspection stations for establishments operating at higher line speeds under traditional inspection.

The CFIA shall make available sufficient numbers of HIP certified inspection staff to perform all the required duties of CFIA inspection, HIP process control correlation testing, and the monitoring of operator programs related to the HIP.

The CFIA HIP floor monitoring function will be filled as part of the regular CFIA inspector rotation. The time requirement for this position will vary depending on the volume and day-to-day performance of each individual facility. The VIC, RVO and Inspection Manager (IM) shall collaborate to determine the station time requirements for this position in each establishment.

CFIA inspection personnel shall monitor plant process control records and generally oversee the activities of the plant production and QA personnel. It is recommended that the same inspector be assigned to the HIP floor monitoring function for at least the full shift and work under the supervision of the VIC/delegate. The floor monitor shall perform randomly scheduled Evisceration, Presentation and Finished Product Standards correlation tests. They may also conduct unscheduled or spontaneous correlation tests if deemed necessary by the VIC/delegate. Independent verification tests of a particular process control step are not routinely performed in the HIP by the CFIA. However, at the discretion of the VIC, such tests may be authorized if it is determined that they are warranted.

The HIP floor monitoring inspector shall enter the date, time, and their initials at the bottom of each evaluated form. If errors are found on the forms or the plant entries are found to be incomplete or untimely, the inspector should describe the findings and actions taken on the bottom or back of the form. CFIA correlation tests may also be recorded on the company forms, provided a different colour of ink is used to distinguish CFIA entries from plant entries.

Due to various facility configurations with respect to how the carcass and its portions are presented for inspection, the VIC may redistribute the recommended staffing numbers indicated in the MOP, Chapter 17, provided the total staff numbers are not altered. The VIC's decision to redistribute staff shall be made in conjunction with the RVO and the Inspection Manager.

3.3.1 CFIA Post-mortem Activities

One of the goals of the HIP policy is to have CFIA staff minimize their handling and manipulation of carcasses and their portions by taking advantage of presentation standards and support equipment such as mirrors, hooks etc. Section 6 of this policy describes these standards in detail.

Head Inspection

As per section 17.7, Chapter 17 of the MOP.

Viscera Inspection
Red Offal:

There are several methods of presenting the red offal (heart, liver and lungs, referred to as the pluck) for inspection. Section 17.7, Chapter 17 of the MOP describes the general inspection requirements that must be met. In instances where the liver is presented as part of the pluck, the hepatic lymph node shall be left intact with the gastro intestinal tract (GIT) for inspection. The dorsal or anterior surface of the liver may be examined visually without manipulation provided this surface is visible.

Grey Offal:

Where the liver is detached from the GIT, the hepatic lymph node shall remain attached to the GIT for purposes of inspection.

Carcass Inspection

As per section 17.7, Chapter 17 of the MOP.

3.3.2 CFIA Inspection Training

CFIA employees will be certified after successfully passing the theoretical and practical CFIA HIP training program.

Any certified CFIA employee not exposed to the application and/or practices of the HIP for one year must be reassessed for proficiency in the HIP program in order to maintain their certification. If necessary, the employee will be required to undergo a refresher training course under the direction of the VIC/delegate and satisfactorily demonstrate their knowledge and application of the HIP before being re-certified.

Seasonal and temporary CFIA employees will be trained for limited participation in HIP inspection but they shall not be responsible for the HIP floor monitoring activities. However, they shall be responsible for understanding and reporting on plant employees who are improperly preparing carcasses and their portions for post-mortem inspection. Any such a CFIA employee who works in this capacity for greater than six continuous months shall receive full HIP certification training.

4.0 Statistical Process Controls

4.1 Introduction to Statistical Process Control (SPC)

Operators of slaughter establishments are responsible for producing meat products that are consistently in compliance with the minimum food safety standards set out in the Meat Inspection Act (MIA), Meat Inspection Regulations, 1990 (MIR), the CFIA's Meat Hygiene Manual of Procedures (MOP) and the CFIA Food Safety Enhancement Program (FSEP). To evaluate and enhance an operator's ability to comply with these standards, the HIP incorporates the use of Statistical Process Controls (SPCs). SPCs are science based tools that objectively measure and improve the performance effectiveness of a manufacturing process or process step.

Under the HIP, dressed carcasses and their relevant portions must meet several performance criteria during the dressing process. These performance criteria (also referred to as standards) are measured at strategic locations in the dressing/inspection process using Evisceration Performance testing (bunging/viscera removal), Presentation Standards (abbreviated to "Presentation") testing, and Finished Product Standards (FPS) testing. Random sampling and testing of carcasses and/or their associated portions during the production shift for a pre-determined level of manufacturing performance standards provides the means to assess food safety and wholesomeness while also determining if the slaughter process is in control.

Establishments that have 2 or fewer post-mortem inspection stations (i.e. abattoirs always operating at 200 cph or less) are not required to perform the Presentation SPC procedure outlined in this annex. However, it is understood that the operator must still meet the standard for the presentation of carcasses and their parts that has been agreed with the Veterinarian in Charge. It is the responsibility of plant management to ensure that all carcasses and their parts are presented for post-mortem inspection in such a way as to permit proper examination by CFIA inspectors.

For new hog slaughter establishments or new hog slaughter operations within an existing registered establishment, operators wishing to initiate dedicated hog slaughter activities within a registered establishment shall provide a facility layout compatible with HIP requirements at the commencement of dedicated hog slaughter operations. Operators shall also design and write the employee HIP training and accreditation program prior to operations starting. A period of 2 months (60 calendar days) after the initiation of hog slaughter operations will be given to the operator to complete training and accreditation requirements of HIP employees. The traditional mode of inspection shall be implemented during the training and accreditation period. The operator shall inform the CFIA as soon as possible of his intention to implement HIP swine in order to ensure that the CFIA trains its staff and prepares accreditation activities for the operator's HIP plant trainers in a timely manner.

When a facility initiates operations under the HIP format they may elect to use the national performance standards or alternately gather and use their own in-plant data to establish their SPC performance level. If the establishment participated in the HIP National Baseline Study, the information from that data collection period may be used. The facility will be allowed 2 months to adjust its operations to meet the declared national performance standards for evisceration performance and FPS food safety and FPS other carcass defects. A maximum of six months will be allowed for an operator to meet the national AQLs for presentation of carcasses and their portions.

Due to the variation in an establishment's presentation configurations, the total number of attributes that are used to assess an AQL score may vary between facilities. In those situations where relatively fewer attributes are used to determine the AQL performance for the same presentation station, a tighter AQL, exceeding the national standard declared in Appendix G, may be negotiated by the VIC and the RVO.

If an operator wishes to gather their own in-plant data it shall be based on a minimum of 25 sample sets taken at each designated process control step and gathered over a minimum of 5 working days. Consultation and collaboration with the Area Program Specialist and the VIC shall occur during this process to ensure validity of data collection. When HIP is fully implemented in the establishment, the operator will be required to meet the minimum national performance standard at all SPC locations as noted above. Refer to Appendix G.

If it is anticipated that any of the performance standards set out in Appendix G, or as noted above, cannot be achieved in the prescribed time frames, either the VIC or the operator shall initiate discussions on this matter in advance of the closing dates and jointly consult with the RVO to determine a course of action.

4.2 SPC Product Testing

4.2.1 QA Verification

It is normally the responsibility of the plant's QA to verify that process controls are implemented correctly. This verification shall include a review of the records for timely and accurate entries, and to provide assurances that appropriate action has been taken when the standards are not met. QA (or designated equivalent) should also conduct independent tests and compare the test results with those of the plant SPC monitors.

4.2.2 CFIA Oversight

CFIA personnel will periodically monitor the plant's QA program by monitoring production activities, reviewing company records, and comparing the results of their own correlation tests with those of Plant Monitors. If there is a general difficulty in achieving consistency between independent company test results and CFIA correlation test results or it is determined that unsatisfactory or poor product/employee performance is occurring during non-testing intervals, such occurrences shall be documented on the appropriate record and corrective action shall be undertaken by the operator or at the direction of the VIC/delegate.

If a CFIA correlation test result fails to correlate with that of the plant monitor during any of the prescribed HIP process control tests, where samples are selected and evaluated on a moving line, an immediate second sample set shall be selected (with the exception of the detection of an FPS FS I defect found during an FPS FS I test) and another test shall be performed. Two consecutive non-matching correlation tests between the operator and the CFIA will require that process action be initiated by the operator (if applicable) based on the results of the second CFIA test which shall be taken as the correct score. The CFIA will monitor all of the operator's corrective action activities to ensure HIP and other CFIA program requirements are met. In the case of FPS-FS I testing any detection of an FPS FS I defect shall be officially recorded and appropriate corrective actions shall be initiated by the operator. If the operator is not in agreement with the CFIA results the operator may elect to stop the line or utilize other means of holding the carcass until the VIC can examine the defect. In this case the VIC shall decide if an FS I defect is present and the results of VIC decision shall be officially recorded and appropriate corrective actions shall be initiated by the operator.

Where any CFIA correlation tests are performed on a static sample set and there are differing outcomes between the operator and the CFIA with respect to the test results, and these differences cannot be immediately resolved, either through a retest procedure or further discussion of the initial findings, the results of the CFIA test shall be taken as the correct result. If the operator is not in agreement with the CFIA results the operator may elect to have the VIC examine the defect. In this case the VIC shall decide if a defect is present and the results of VIC decision shall be officially recorded and if appropriate, corrective actions shall be initiated by the operator.

In all such cases the operator shall investigate and reconcile the discrepancy in scoring results and report and discuss his/her findings with the VIC after all required immediate process actions have been implemented.

4.2.3 Consistent SPC Performance

If it becomes apparent from historical performance data (5 or more consecutive shifts) that an operator cannot perform consistentlyFootnote 1 at an established AQL for any of the process control steps in the HIP, and previous corrective action undertakings by the operator have not provided long term resolution of the problem, the line speed maximums for the process step(s) involved shall be re-assessed by the VIC/RVO and reset to a lower maximum level using an initial incremental reduction of 10%. If the initial line speed reduction does not provide satisfactory improvements within the first half of the shift, further reduction(s) shall be imposed until the accepted AQL for the affected process step(s) has been achieved. The line speed at which the AQL is achieved shall remain in place for a minimum of 5 consecutive working shifts.

4.2.4 Plant Personnel

Only accredited industry personnel shall perform the tests described in the HIP. The test results shall be recorded on the appropriate CFIA forms. All process actions generated by the HIP tests shall be the operator's responsibility. Such actions may be initiated by either plant production or QA personnel. The VIC/delegate shall be notified by a responsible plant person whenever the SPC test results initiate certain specific process action under the HIP.

As a general observation, production employees should be exempted from any process control testing procedure if their objectivity may be compromised when conducting these tests. If a production employee is required to perform any SPC test, they should not be influenced by the presence of a Production Supervisor. If this impartiality cannot be assured, it is recommended that QA be in charge of all SPC tests. The VIC shall review this situation in their establishment and determine what arrangement is required to produce the most reliable product evaluation results.

4.2.5 Sample Selection

One of the major principles in any SPC testing program involving the selection of samples is that each unit in the population has an equal chance of being selected for testing. This principle is supported in the HIP within the practical restraints of this inspection system and the slaughter environment.

A designated plant person shall select random times according to the plant's written program for conducting SPC tests. This person shall submit the selected times to the VIC/delegate before the beginning of each shift.

Any sample unit (carcass or its parts) adversely affected by the presence of a pathological/abnormal condition will not be used for any SPC test except Finished Product Standards testing. The next immediate trailing unit shall be substituted in lieu and scored as part of the sample set.

If the line stops during an SPC test, the remaining sample units for the test are chosen when the line restarts and the line speed returns to normal. The monitor shall ensure the tested attributes of these sample units are not affected by the line stoppage.

In the case of a prolonged line stoppage where the stoppage exceeds 2/3 of a production lot's time interval, the randomly scheduled viscera presentation test(s) for that specific lot may be waived. Waiving of all other scheduled tests during that interval is at the discretion of the VIC.

4.2.6 Frequency of Testing

Abattoirs operating normally at 200 carcasses per hour (cph) or less are not required to perform Presentation SPC procedures outlined in this annex. However it is understood that the operator must still meet the standard for the presentation of carcasses and their parts that has been agreed with the Veterinarian in Charge. For details see section 4.1 and section 6.2 of this document. When an establishment that operates at 200 cph or less proceeds to operate at a speed over 200 cph, the operator shall immediately perform Presentation SPC procedures as outlined in this annex and shall continue performing these tests during the rest of the week, even if the line speed goes back to 200 cph or less during that week. When an establishment that operates at a speed over 200 cph proceeds to operate at a speed of 200 cph or less, the operator shall continue to perform Presentation SPC procedures as outlined in this annex for a speed over 200 cph during the rest of the week.

The operator shall perform the SPC tests at the frequencies stated in table 4.1 or for table 4.1a, as applicable. When an establishment that operates normally at 100 cph or less proceeds to a speed over 100 cph, the operator shall perform SPC testing and related procedures as outlined in this annex for a speed over 100 cph during the rest of the week, even if the line speed goes back to 100 cph or less during that week. When an establishment that operates normally at a speed over 100 cph proceeds to operate at a speed of 100 cph or less, the operator shall continue to perform SPC testing and related procedures as outlined in this annex for a speed over 100 cph during the rest of the week. Also refer to the Training Module E 5.

Table 4.1 SPC Testing Frequencies
A. Performance Tests – Evisceration
Performed by Test Mode Frequency
Operator Reduced (elective) Random every 60/30 min based on lot size
Operator Normal Random every 60/30 min based on lot size
Operator Tightened 1st test within 15 min and every 15 min thereafter
B. Performance Tests – Presentation – Head (MLN), Viscera and Carcass
Performed by Test Mode Frequency
Operator Reduced mode (elective) Random, every 30 or 60 min based on lot size
Operator Normal mode Random, every 30 or 60 min based on lot size
Operator Tightened mode 1st test within 15 min, every 15 min thereafter
C. Performance Tests – Finished Product – Food Safety Defects
Performed by Test Mode Frequency
Operator Reduced mode (elective) Random, every 30 or 60 min based on lot size
Operator Normal mode Random, every 30 or 60 min based on lot size
Operator Tightened mode 1st test within 15 min, every 15 min thereafter
D. Performance Tests – Finished Product – Other Carcass Defects
Performed by Test Mode Frequency
Operator Regular mode Random, every 30 or 60 min based on lot size
Operator Relaxed mode (elective) Every 1 hr or 2 hrs based on lot size

Once a lot size (half an hour or 1 hour production) is selected by the operator and approved by the VIC/RVO based on the facility's process control capability, it cannot be changed spontaneously. A written request shall be submitted to the VIC and a mutually acceptable implementation date must be negotiated for any change to the lot size.

Table 4.1a SPC Testing Frequencies for Small Establishments
(i.e. for abattoirs operating at 100 carcasses per hour (cph) or less)
A. Performance Tests – Evisceration
Performed by Mode Lot size Frequency
Operator Reduced Table Note 2
(elective)
One hour of production once per half shift (if a failure, test again in half an hr)
Operator Normal One hour production once per half shift (if a failure, test again in half an hr)
Operator Tightened 15 min of production 1st test within 15 min, every 15 min thereafter
B. Performance Tests – Finished Product – Food Safety Defects (FS)
Performed by Mode Lot size Frequency
Operator Reduced Table Note 2 (elective) One hour production once per half shift (if a failure, test again in half an hr)
Operator Normal One hour production once per half shift (if a failure, test again in half an hr)
Operator Tightened 15 min of production 1st test within 15 min, every 15 min thereafter
C. Performance Tests – Finished Product – Other Carcass defects (FPS-OC)
Performed by Mode Lot size Frequency
Operator Regular One hour production once per half shift

Table Notes

Table note 2

Note: Small establishments that have a reduced frequency of testing must have a lot size of one hour for purposes of rework.

Return to table note 2  referrer

4.2.7 Shift Continuity of All Statistical Process Control (SPC) Testing

The test results, test status and completed forms for all SPC testing shall remain continuous from shift to shift. Whatever the test status is at the end of a shift shall be the status at the beginning of the subsequent consecutive shift. In multiple shift establishments, the day and afternoon shifts shall be treated as separate and independent entities and shall maintain separate test results, completed forms and corrective actions for each.

4.2.8 Carcass and Carcass Parts Testing Proximity

When the various SPC carcass/carcass parts monitoring tests are being performed by either the operator or the CFIA, the proximity of the surface under evaluation shall be at approximately arm's length from the monitor.

4.2.9 Line Speed Reductions

Line speed reductions are sometimes a mandatory process action step when SPC standards are not being met and the operator is trying to regain control of their process. When this occurs, no more than one type of process control step shall initiate a line speed reduction at any one given time.

4.2.10 Lot Rework Verification

The operator shall notify the CFIA when rework is being performed on an affected lot. As well, records of rework verification and evaluation performance shall be maintained by the operator. The frequency of rework monitoring by the CFIA shall be at the discretion of the VIC. For details on lot rework procedures refer to section 11.

4.2.11 HIP Record Retention

The operator shall maintain HIP SPC records for a minimum period of one year and these records shall be available to the CFIA upon request of the VIC. SPC test records pertaining to current production and those records necessary to determine test modes shall be available to the CFIA in the evisceration area.

4.2.12 SPC Corrective Actions

All corrective actions outlined in the operator's written program shall be previously approved by the VIC in consultation with the RVO. These corrective actions may include, but are not restricted to the following:

  • re-evaluation of received food animals to meet the operator's performance standards;
  • analysis of process steps prior to the test location where the failure occurred;
  • addition of extra accredited personnel;
  • line speed reduction;
  • equipment adjustment;
  • replacement of personnel; and
  • increase in test frequency.

5.0 Performance Tests – Evisceration

5.1 Introduction to the ISO Evisceration Performance Test

For more detailed information on the ISO sampling plans used for the Evisceration Performance Test, Presentation Standards Test and Finished Product Standards Test, see the CFIA Training Module E6, Annex I and Appendix G of this policy.

The purpose of the ISO Evisceration Performance Test is to consistently reduce evisceration accidents to the lowest possible level by providing a real time performance measurement of the evisceration step. This real time monitoring and feedback provides the plant production personnel with crucial information about their own personal performance. This approach has been shown to be an objective and statistically reliable means of determining when early process intervention (corrective action) is warranted.

Advances in equipment technology and the desire to control food safety dressing defects as early in the dressing process as possible place demands on the need for flexibility in the implementation of the Evisceration Performance Test. For those circumstances where an operator wishes to use automated equipment or manual equipment as an intervention step immediately after evisceration but in advance of the test being performed, the integrity of the Evisceration Performance Test results shall be preserved. This does not prevent the operator from proposing various methods of carcass marking and identification to satisfy both outcomes. All proposals for special procedure exemptions shall receive the approval of the National Program in consultation with the RVO.

An accredited plant employee shall conduct a scheduled but randomized hourly or half hourly (as determined by the operator) Evisceration Performance Test on a specified number (see Module E 5) of consecutive or alternately consecutive carcasses at a station immediately after the evisceration step and prior to any further alteration or trimming (special approved procedures exempted) of the carcass. This test may be performed on an unsplit or split carcass provided the above condition is met. The test shall only evaluate visible carcass contamination resulting from gastro-intestinal spillage. Coincidental findings such as buccal cavity regurgitation, while not an acceptable finding for an approved carcass, is not to be scored using the Evisceration Performance Test. As previously noted, it is acceptable for the operator to choose to immediately remove any food safety dressing defect prior to the testing station provided the integrity of the test results are preserved.

In swine slaughter establishments where the hide is removed rather than the carcass scalded and de-haired, an additional Hide Removal Performance test shall not be performed to evaluate hide removal as is the case in beef slaughter. Instead the operator shall ensure that the external surfaces of the carcass are satisfactorily prepared in accordance with Chapter 17, section 17.6 of the MOP.

5.2 Evisceration Performance Test Procedures

See Appendix G.

The operator shall designate accredited persons to schedule and conduct the Evisceration Performance Test and initiate corrective action whenever the required standards are not met. The test monitoring/verification function can be shared between plant production and QA or it may be performed by QA alone if the operator so chooses.

The operator shall notify the VIC/delegate when required as indicated in Appendix A: Decision Tree for HIP Evisceration Performance Testing.

5.2.1 Evisceration Performance Test Scoring

Scoring of evisceration errors is based on the ISO attribute system using Sampling Plan 2859-1, Inspection level S-4 (note: inspection level S1 may be used in plants operating at 100 cph or less); refer to Appendix G. Carcasses are only scored as "positive" or "negative" for the presence of any distinguishable fecal or ingesta defect related to evisceration. Any carcass found to be positive during the test shall be clearly and immediately marked/identified so the defect is corrected prior to the final approval of the carcass.

Minimum performance standards for the Evisceration test are based on the HIP National Baseline Study, 2004. These performance standards will be re-evaluated as more data becomes available. Appendix G indicates the minimum standards that are to be met by all federal facilities.

When a facility initiates operations under the HIP format they may initially use their in-plant data to establish their mean evisceration performance. The facility will be given two months to adjust its operations to meet the declared national performance standards if the in-plant mean performance exceeds the national standard. See Appendix G.

All Evisceration Performance Test results are to be recorded on form CFIA HIP 001: HIP Evisceration Testing. Appendix A: Decision Tree for HIP Evisceration Performance Testing provides additional details on the process action steps that shall occur for each of the following Evisceration Performance Test scores.

5.2.2 Evisceration Performance Test Modes

All facilities commencing inspection for the first time under the HIP shall commence testing in normal mode. Sample size and test frequency is based on the operator's choice of a lot size (see table 4.1 and table 4.1a for SPC Testing Frequencies).

Normal Mode

The operator must continue to successfully pass a minimum of four out of five consecutive random tests to maintain Normal mode status.

Should the operator fail two tests within any window of five consecutive tests, random sampling shall be suspended and the testing mode shall be switched to Tightened mode on the subsequent test. Alternately, after 10 consecutive successful tests in Normal mode the operator may change to Reduced mode.

No action is required when a satisfactory performance score is obtained. Scheduled random testing shall continue. The CFIA shall be notified any time there is a change to Tightened mode and random sampling shall be suspended. The operator shall investigate and correct the cause of the failure. See Appendix A: Decision Tree for Evisceration Performance.

Small establishments that are testing at reduced frequency and have a failure in Normal mode must do an additional test in half an hour to verify performance. A failure of this additional test will cause a change of mode to Tightened. An accepted score will result in a return to normal test frequency.

Tightened Mode

Upon entering Tightened mode, random testing shall be suspended and a test shall be conducted within 15 minutes of the previously failed Normal mode test. Testing shall continue every 15 minutes thereafter until Normal mode is restored. Five consecutive successful tests must be passed in order to return to Normal mode. Random testing shall be resumed upon returning to Normal mode.

Reduced Mode (Elective)

Ten consecutive successful test scores in Normal mode shall be achieved before the operator can switch to Reduced Mode. Any single failure of a test score in Reduced mode will require that the operator move back to Normal mode. The operator should initiate corrective actions as deemed necessary and shall perform the next test within 15 minutes of the failed test, followed by a second test 15 minutes later. If both tests are successful, resume random testing in Normal mode. See section 5.2.4 for related actions.

Small establishments that are testing at reduced frequency and have a failure in Reduced Mode and thus change modes to Normal must do an additional test in half an hour to verify performance. A failure of this test in Normal must be followed by another test in half an hour. A failure in the second test in Normal will cause a change of mode to Tightened. An accepted score will result in a return to normal test frequency.

5.2.3 FPS-FS I Testing due to Evisceration Performance Test Failure

A change in status from Normal to Tightened mode or Reduced to Normal mode, for the Evisceration Performance Test will require that the FPS-FS I Performance Test change its testing frequency (but remain in its current mode) to validate evisceration corrective measures.

Any Evisceration Performance Test failure while in Reduced mode will require that the operator change status to Normal mode, temporarily suspend random Evisceration and FPS-FS I testing frequency. There shall be an FPS-FS I test performed immediately after each of the first two evisceration tests in Normal mode. If the two Evisceration Performance Tests are successful, random testing frequency shall be resumed provided the initial two Evisceration Performance Tests in Normal mode have satisfactory results. Any test failures that occur in FPS-FS I or Evisceration Performance shall be scored in accordance with the ISO switching rules for that mode.

In the event of a Normal mode failure, the operator shall change status to Tightened mode and there shall be an FPS-FS I test performed immediately after each of the first two Tightened mode tests for evisceration performance. If both Tightened mode Tests linked to FPS FS I are successful, the FPS-FS I test shall return to a random testing frequency. If the Evisceration test continues to fail, an associated FPS-FS I test shall be performed after each failed evisceration test until the evisceration test passes. Any failure in tightened mode will result in two linked FPS FS I tests.

However, when the FPS-FS I test fails and changes to either Normal or Tightened mode, the Evisceration Performance test mode shall not be affected and continue to operate at its current test status and frequency.

Any failure of an FPS test will be scored in accordance with the ISO switching rules for that mode. (See Appendix C).

5.2.4 Corrective Actions – Evisceration Performance Test

Appropriate actions following a failure in any of the above categories is required by the operator as specified in Appendix A: Decision Tree for HIP Evisceration Performance Testing. All corrective actions outlined in the operator's written program shall be previously approved by the VIC. These corrective actions may include, but are not restricted to the following:

  • re-evaluation of received food animals to meet the operator's performance standards;
  • analysis of process steps prior to the test location where the failure occurred;
  • addition of extra accredited personnel;
  • line speed reduction;
  • equipment adjustment;
  • replacement of personnel; and
  • increased test frequency.

6.0 Performance Tests – Presentation

6.1 Introduction to Presentation Testing

The provision for uniform presentation standards is a key element in the implementation of the HIP. It provides not only for consistency in the presentation of carcasses and their portions but it also reduces potential food safety concerns and offers an early indication as to whether certain carcass dressing procedures are in control or not. When the carcass or its parts are not uniformly presented in a predetermined manner, time allotted for inspection must be used to correct or compensate for presentation errors. Therefore, minimum presentation standards also ensure effective and efficient inspection. The adequacy of presentation is affected by several factors such as disease conditions, carcass uniformity, evisceration line configuration, sequence of evisceration procedures, adequate equipment, lighting, but most notably well trained and efficient production employees.

6.2 Plant Responsibilities

Regardless of the size of the establishment, it is the responsibility of every operator to ensure that carcasses and their parts are presented for post-mortem inspection in such a way as to permit proper examination by CFIA inspectors. To that effect, the operator and the VIC shall agree on a presentation schematic that will become the standard for the establishment.

Plant management is responsible for implementing the prescribed presentation standards for heads (including mandibular lymph nodes), viscera and carcasses by plant personnel. The operator shall designate accredited persons to schedule and conduct Presentation Tests and initiate corrective action whenever the required standards are not met.

The monitoring function can be shared between plant production and QA or it may be performed by QA alone if the operator so chooses. The operator shall notify the VIC/delegate when required as indicated in Appendix B: Decision Tree for HIP Presentation Testing.

6.3 Excessive Line Speed

Line speed is checked at the time of Presentation testing. If on any test, the line speed is found to exceed the currently allowed rate, an immediate line speed reduction to the allowed rate is required. After any line speed reduction the line speed shall be rechecked within 15 minutes. Upon test, if the line speed is again found to be above the allowed rate (+ 1% allowance), the VIC/delegate must be notified and a 10% reduction from the current maximum allowed line speed shall be applied.

6.4 Presentation Performance Standards

The operator and the VIC shall collaborate and mutually agree upon an acceptable method and orientation for presenting the carcass and its portions for CFIA inspection. Orientation for proper presentation is from the Inspector's viewpoint facing the moving chain or table. Once approved by the VIC, a schematic diagram depicting the presentation standard shall be included in the operator's written program and a copy of the schematic shall be posted in a conspicuous location in the QA office and the CFIA office. All plants, regardless of size, must have a presentation schematic.

6.5 Presentation Performance Scoring

Scoring of presentation errors is based on the ISO attribute system using Sampling Plan ISO 2859-1 (S-3). In each of the three presentation categories (heads, carcass and viscera) a list of defects or attributes has been established to ensure that a minimum standard of presentation is maintained in each category. ISO switching rules for Reduced, Normal and Tightened modes apply to this standard. Any attribute (condition/defect) detected shall be scored as a defect.

Because of the variation in the configuration of federally registered establishments, the AQL for each presentation category will vary depending on the complexity and number of attributes assigned to that category. Once presentation test AQLs are determined for an establishment, they will be recorded in the company's written program.

Three basic principles are applied when a plant monitor or the CFIA performs a Presentation Test. These principles are:

  1. testing in Normal, Tightened, or Reduced modes shall continue unchanged except where indicated by the decision tree (see Appendix B: Decision Tree for HIP Presentation Testing);
  2. a sample unit (head, viscera, or carcass) fails if one or more attributes are scored; and
  3. there is a maximum of one failure per sample unit.

All presentation test results are to be recorded on the applicable CFIA forms:

  • CFIA HIP 002A: HIP Presentation Testing – Heads (MLN presented on head)
  • CFIA HIP 002B: HIP Presentation Testing – Heads (MLN presented off head)
  • CFIA HIP 003A: HIP Presentation – Viscera (Hook & Pan)
  • CFIA HIP 003B: Presentation Testing – Viscera (Tray / Table)
  • CFIA HIP 004A: HIP Presentation Testing – Carcasses (MLN presented on head)
  • CFIA HIP 004B: HIP Presentation Testing – Carcasses (MLN presented off head).

An operator may commence HIP operations and activities using in-plant data to establish the initial minimum performance limit for each of the presentation tests.

However, after a period not exceeding six months, the operator shall meet the minimum national AQL standards listed in Appendix G. If the operator is not able to meet these standards after the specified time period the VIC shall notify and consult with the RVO. Consultation may also include the National Program Specialist.

Presentation Testing Modes

All facilities commencing inspection for the first time under the HIP shall start testing in Normal mode. Sample size and test frequency is based on the operator's definition of a lot (see Table 4.1: HIP SPC Testing Frequencies).

Normal Mode

The operator must continue to successfully pass a minimum of four out of five consecutive random tests to maintain Normal mode status. Should the operator fail two presentation tests within any window of five consecutive tests, random testing shall be suspended and the testing mode shall be switched to Tightened on the subsequent test. The CFIA shall be notified of the mode change and test failure. The operator shall investigate and correct the cause of the failure. Alternately, after 10 consecutive successful tests in Normal mode, the operator may change to Reduced mode.

Tightened Mode

Upon entering Tightened mode random testing shall be suspended and another test shall be conducted within 15 minutes of the previously failed Normal mode test and testing shall continue every 15 minutes thereafter until Normal mode is restored. Five consecutive successful tests must be passed in order to return to Normal mode. At that time, random testing shall be resumed.

After any two failures in a window of five consecutive tests, while in Tightened mode, the operator shall notify the VIC/delegate. Consultation shall occur between the operator and the CFIA to determine the cause of the presentation under performance. A 10% line speed reduction shall be exercised prior to resuming operations.

Reduced Mode (Elective)

Ten consecutive successful test scores in Normal mode shall be achieved before the operator can switch to Reduced Mode. Any single failure of a test score in Reduced mode will move the operator back to Normal mode. The operator should initiate corrective actions as deemed necessary.

7.0 Performance Tests – Presentation – Heads

Mandibular lymph nodes (MLN) are presented in a variety of configurations for CFIA inspection. The reader should refer to the section below that is applicable for the presentation method utilized in their establishment.

7.1 Heads (MLN) Presentation

The head shall be presented with essentially no movement that would be considered to interfere with the inspection procedure. The MLN must be readily accessible and consistently located in the same anatomical area as determined by the operator's standards for presentation. The tongue usually remains in the buccal cavity until after final carcass inspection.

7.1.1 Dorsal Presentation of MLN

The head is disarticulated at the atlanto-occipital joint and dropped but remains attached to the carcass by the chin skin. The dorsal side of the carcass faces the inspector. The MLN are presented at the angle of the mandible.

7.1.2 Ventral Presentation of MLN

The head is not disarticulated and access to the MLN is achieved from the ventral or belly side of the carcass. The MLN are prepared in a traditional manner via a pharyngeal opening with the nodes being exposed in the area of the mandibular angle.

7.2 MLN (Attached to Tongue Root/Larynx) Presentation

Both MLN (attached to laryngeal/lingual area) are removed from the carcass. The tongue may or may not be attached to the MLN. If removed from the head, the tongue shall remain identified with the head/carcass until after final inspection.

If the MLN are presented on a hook, they shall be presented in a position where they can be easily inspected without interference from the hook.

If the MLN are presented on a tray or table, they shall be presented in a position where they can readily grasped for examination and incision.

7.3 MLN Presentation Defects

MLN must be presented intact (greater than 50% of each node must be present) and consistently exposed in the area of the mandibular angle (ventral or dorsal approach) or attached to the tongue root/laryngeal area if presented with the pluck. The Inspector shall not be required to make any incisions to expose the MLN when they are presented on the carcass or with the pluck. It is considered a presentation defect if:

  • greater than 50% of one lymph node is in the wrong location;
  • greater than 50% of one lymph node is obscured from view; or
  • greater than 50% of one lymph node is missing.

7.4 Head Presentation Defects

Heads must be presented properly attached to the carcass without rotation or excess motion. Excessive head motion is defined as any swinging or spinning motion that would interfere with or delay the Inspector's hook placement. This motion needs to be judged before the centre line of the first inspection station.

It is considered a presentation defect if the head is:

  • not attached or is only partially attached to the carcass by the normal skin attachment (regardless of whether reattached by other means);
  • rotated more than 45°; or
  • moving excessively.

8.0 Performance Tests – Presentation – Viscera

The viscera shall be consistently presented to meet the operator's presentation standard and to minimize manipulation by the CFIA inspector. Viscera (grey offal and red offal) may be presented in several configurations. Each operator will determine in conjunction with the VIC which method of viscera presentation and orientation will be implemented in the establishment.

All operators, regardless of the line speed in their plant, will create a diagram depicting the reference standard for viscera presentation in their establishment and, after VIC approval, this schematic will serve as the scoring standard for the ISO viscera presentation tests.

8.1 Red Offal

Note

Where portions of paired organs (e.g. kidneys) are missing, at least 50% of each of the paired organs or one complete organ from the pair shall be present to allow the Inspector to render a disposition. At least 50% of an unpaired organ (e.g. heart) shall be present in order for a disposition to be rendered. In the case of the liver, at least 50% of the liver shall be present.

Where an organ such as the lungs, liver or kidneys are presented with no part of the organ missing it is sufficient to only examine the exposed side of the organ without further manipulation. Failing this the Inspector shall proceed to manipulate the portion to the extent that these conditions are met.

8.1.1 Red Offal Presentation – Hook

The red offal must be readily accessible and consistently suspended as determined by the operator's standards for presentation. Intact organs (defined for the purpose of HIP viscera presentation testing as the heart, liver and lungs) must be present, the pericardial sac must be incised and there must be no gastrointestinal tract (GIT) contamination of the tissues. The red offal shall be close enough to allow easy manipulation by the inspector, if necessary, but not so close so as to impede the inspector's view of the grey offal.

Red offal hook presentation generally includes the larynx (tongue may or may not be attached), trachea, esophagus, lungs, heart and liver. The offal may be suspended from the hook by the posterior base of the larynx, proximal trachea, or base of the heart. Placement is critical to present the correct travelling surface of the red offal for inspection. For sanitary dressing reasons, it is recommended that the tongue remain in the buccal cavity until after final carcass inspection.

The red offal shall be suspended from the hook in such a way that the cranial ventral surfaces of the lungs face towards the Inspector. This means that the heart (pericardial sac incised), cranial ventral portions of the lungs, pleural surface of the diaphragm (skirt meat), and dorsal surface of the liver are readily visible. The hepatic lymph node remains with the grey offal and, therefore, the liver need not be manipulated to see both surfaces.

Where the trachea has been mechanically damaged during carcass dressing and the pluck is normally suspended by the larynx, the pluck may be suspended by placing the junction of the heart base, where it attaches to the rest of the pluck, in the cradle of the hook and oriented so the heart is leading. All portions must still be visible for inspection without additional manipulation.

The red offal including the liver must be suspended high enough or offset so that it does not contact the surface of the grey offal.

Consistent or frequent loss of carcass parts that occur at a rate of 5% or greater over a specified time interval shall be immediately corrected by the operator.

8.1.2 Red Offal Presentation Defects – Hook

It is considered a presentation defect if:

  • the pluck is improperly suspended;
  • the pluck is rotated greater than 90° from normal;
  • the pluck is contaminated by GIT contents;
  • greater than 50% of any organ (defined above) is missing;
  • the pericardial sac is not incised; or
  • any organ is placed in the grey offal pan.

8.1.3 Red Offal Presentation – Tray / Table

Conventional red offal pluck presentation will include the larynx (mandibular lymph nodes and tongue may or may not be attached as indicated above), trachea, lungs, heart and the liver may or may not be included.

The described organs shall be consistently laid out as determined by the operator's presentation standard so that the Inspector may visually assess the dorsal surface of the lungs, the dorsal surface of the liver (if included as part of the organ group) and the trachea/larynx without having to perform any manipulation. The heart with the pericardial sac incised shall be readily visualized by lifting the anterior lobe of the lung. There shall be no GIT contamination of the red offal.

If the kidneys are presented on the tray/table, greater than 50% of each kidney shall be present and exposed.

8.1.4 Red Offal Presentation Defects – Tray / Table

It is considered a presentation defect if:

  • the red offal tissues are not in their normal quadrant or are rotated greater than 45° from the schematic standard;
  • the red offal is contaminated by GIT contents;
  • greater than 50% of any organ (defined for the purpose of presentation testing as the heart; liver and lungs) is missing or obscured from vision;
  • the pericardial sac is not incised;
  • the dorsal surfaces of the lungs and liver are not visible; or
  • the kidneys are presented on the tray/table and greater than 50% of each kidney is not present or exposed.

8.2 Grey Offal

Grey offal is presented in a variety of configurations. In those configurations where the liver is separated from the GIT, the liver shall be removed from the intestinal pack in such a manner that the hepatic lymph node is left attached to the intestinal peritoneum so it may be readily visualized by the Inspector. Grey offal presentation normally includes the gastrointestinal tract, spleen, uterus and bladder and shall be presented in such a way that the mesenteric and hepatic lymph nodes (if liver not present) and spleen are easily visible so the Inspector does not have to perform any manipulation.

8.3 Grey Offal Presentation – Pan

Each portion of grey offal in the pan presentation is to be found consistently in the same general region of the pan according to the operator's presentation schematic. With full or gaseous gastrointestinal tracts, it may be necessary for the Inspector to move the interfering cecum or colon. Greater than 50% of all organs (defined for the purposes of viscera presentation testing as the mesenteric lymph node chain, hepatic lymph node and spleen) must be visible on presentation and no portion of the grey offal shall be outside of the pan.

Contamination alone of the intestinal portions of the grey offal with ingesta or fecal material is not a reason for presentation failure unless it impedes the inspection procedure.

8.4 Grey Offal Presentation – Tray / Table

The grey offal in this configuration can include the liver in addition to the intestinal pack and its other associated organs. The intestinal tract shall be laid out such that greater than 50% of all organs are visible on presentation. The liver shall be placed in a location on the tray or table such that it does not obstruct the visualization of the intestinal tract. The dorsal surface of the liver shall be completely exposed for visual inspection.

There shall be no spillage of organs or parts outside the tray/table and there shall be no common contact with portions from other adjacent carcasses.

8.5 Grey Offal Presentation Defects

It is considered a presentation defect if:

  • the grey offal tissues are not in their normal quadrant or are rotated more than 45° from the schematic standard;
  • any portion of the grey offal is outside the pan/tray/table;
  • greater than 50% of any organ (defined for the purpose of presentation testing as the mesenteric lymph node chain, hepatic lymph node, spleen and liver, if applicable) is missing; or
  • greater than 50% of an organ is not visible due to obstruction by other tissues or major contamination.

9.0 Performance Tests – Presentation – Carcasses

9.1 Carcass Presentation

The carcass shall be presented split and hanging vertically in the open position so that the pleural cavity surface, peritoneal cavity surface, and the kidneys (if present) are facing the Inspector. These structures shall be easily visualized with minimal or no carcass manipulation.

The kidney presenter shall expose the kidneys for visual inspection either in the carcass or by placing the kidneys in the tray in front of the viscera Inspector. Abnormal kidneys shall be managed as per CFIA instructions.

A distortion free mirror for carcass inspection is recommended at all line speeds. However, in those establishments operating above 200 cph, mirrors shall be present so the entire dorsal surface of the carcass is visible to the Inspector as they stand in front of the passing carcass.

In those establishments where the MLN are presented and examined detached from the head, head presentation shall also be assessed with the carcass.

9.2 Carcass Presentation Defects

It is considered a presentation defect if:

  • the carcass sides are not attached (based on company's carcass presentation standard);
  • the carcass is unsplit;
  • the carcass approaches the Inspector rotated more than 45° from the perpendicular; or
  • greater than 50% of each kidney is missing or not exposed.

Note that carcasses presented to the Inspector unsplit or not spread because of pathology are not counted.

In those establishments where the MLN are presented and examined detached from the head, it is considered a presentation defect if:

  • the head is detached from the carcass during carcass inspection.

10.0 Performance Tests – Finished Product

10.1 Introduction to Finished Product Standards Testing

It is critical in slaughter production environments to be able to perform periodic product evaluations on the finished product in order to validate hygienic manufacturing performance.

Finished Product Standards (FPS) testing is designed to verify that the procedures used in preparing and approving a dressed food animal carcass are in control and a product is produced that is in conformance with minimum Canadian regulatory standards. FPS tests are performed on selected sample sets of carcasses randomly chosen throughout the production shift to validate the operator's performance in meeting prescribed performance standards.

Accredited plant personnel are responsible for performing FPS tests as well as taking the appropriate action in response to the FPS test results. Certified CFIA inspectors are responsible for monitoring the establishment's tests, actions and records; as well as performing correlation tests and periodic independent tests (as deemed necessary by the VIC) to verify the company's performance.

FPS testing is meant to detect the incidence of carcass dressing defects classified under three categories. FPS Food Safety I (FPS-FS I), FPS Food Safety II (FPS-FS II) and FPS Other Carcass defects (FPS-OC). FPS-FS I and FPS-FS II are carcass defects that have the potential to create a food safety risk. These defects are listed as part of Table 10.1. FPS-FS I defects result from gastro-intestinal or milk spillage. FPS-FS II defects result from the presence of various types and degrees of untrimmed pathological conditions. FPS-OC defects are generally the result of untrimmed, food wholesomeness defects and/or conditions that are required to be removed by regulation as part of the dressing procedure. When selecting a carcass sample set for FPS testing, the operator shall provide adequate facilities to isolate all selected carcasses off-line prior to the final carcass wash cabinet.

In establishments where swine are slaughtered at line speeds of less than 200 cph, the operator may choose to perform the carcass FPS tests on line immediately prior to the final carcass wash cabinet. This is only acceptable if the operator can demonstrate an ability to effectively examine and refurbish all carcasses examined in a sample set prior to the final carcass wash.

From the time that a new operator commences product testing under the HIP program, he shall be allowed a period of two months (60 consecutive calendar days) to meet the national performance standard for FPS-FS I defect removal. Refer to Appendix G. If the operator is not able to meet this standard after the allotted trial period the VIC shall notify and consult with the National Program Officer and the Regional Veterinary Officer.

FPS-FS I defects shall be evaluated on the basis of colour, texture and consistency. They must be clearly identifiable before being scored as such. Generally defects that are less than 3.0 mm in their greatest dimension can be difficult to characterize with certainty when using only the naked eye. If the observer is not able to clearly identify a defect as being of gastrointestinal origin or milk, it shall be classified as extraneous or foreign material, removed and scored under the FPS-OC defects category.

10.2 Finished Product Standards – Food Safety Category I (FPS-FS I) Defect Testing

Normal mode is the starting mode when HIP is first introduced in an establishment. Scheduled random sampling for FPS-FS testing is performed by the operator and monitored by the CFIA. The randomly selected carcass sample set is evaluated for the presence of FS I defects. Sample size is determined according to ISO Sampling Plan 2859-1, using Inspection level FS-1 and a nationally determined AQL. See Appendix G and Module E 5 for additional information.

In establishments where the sample set is examined off-line, all carcass samples shall be selected consecutively from the moving rail using a standard random selection technique described in the operator's written program.

In establishments where the sample set is examined on-line, the first carcass should be selected using a standard random selection technique and each subsequently sampled carcass shall be chosen at regular intervals (e.g., every 10th carcass). The sampling procedure shall be fully described in the company's written program and must be approved by the VIC.

All individual carcasses found to have pathological defects that do not pose a contamination concern by being subject to carcass washing may be identified and segregated on a designated rail in the carcass cooler for subsequent reconditioning.

Any FPS-FS I defect encountered during the examination of the carcasses in the sample set scores as zero tolerance and results in the failure of that sample set. All carcasses shall be examined in a sample set even if the sample set fails due to the examination of the initial carcasses in the set. All defects shall be removed in a sanitary manner before the sample set is released.

FPS-FS I test results shall be recorded on form CFIA HIP 005: ISO HIP Finished Product Standards Test – Food Safety Defects and resultant actions are indicated in Appendix C: Decision Tree for HIP FPS-FS Defect Testing.

Table 10.1 FPS-FS Category I and Category II Defects:

Non-exhaustive list of carcass GDAC of concern from a food safety risk perspectiveFootnote 6 (under review)

  • Abscess
  • Anemia
  • Arthritis/arthrosis
  • Ascites
  • Cachexia
  • Cyanosis/congestion/edema
  • Emaciation
  • Fecal contamination (FS I)
  • Gangrene
  • Hydrothorax
  • Hypothermia/hyperthermia
  • Icterus/jaundice
  • Ingesta contamination (FS I)
  • Injection site
  • Lymphadenitis and lymphadenopathy
  • Milk (FS I)
  • Multifocal cutaneous macules
  • Polyserositis
  • Pustular dermatitis
  • Serous atrophy of fat
  • Multiple GDAC

The presence of GDAC (except fecal, ingesta contamination) needs to be confirmed by the CFIA veterinarian at the slaughter establishment.

GDAC = Generalized Disease Abnormalities and Conditions

10.2.1 Finished Product Standards – Food Safety Category II (FPS-FS II) Defect Testing

Scheduled random sampling for FPS-FS II pathology defects shall be performed by the operator and monitored by the CFIA. The test shall be performed for the purposes of data gathering only until further notice.

Any FS II pathology defect noted while conducting the FPS-FS I or FPS-OC test is to be recorded in the allocated section of one of the forms noted below. Ensure double recording does not occur where the same FS II defect is noted on a carcass common to both tests. Carcasses shall be examined, re-conditioned as required and test results recorded on HIP Form 005 or HIP Form 006, as applicable.

10.2.2 FPS-FS I Test Modes

There is zero tolerance for any FPS FS-FS I defect; therefore, the sample set and associated lot fails as a result of detection of any FPS FS-FS I defect. The operator shall immediately identify and hold the production lot associated with the test failure for rework procedures. The CFIA shall be notified. All carcasses in the sample set must be examined and all classes of defects (FS I, FS II, OC) must be sanitarily removed before the sample set carcasses are released.

Normal Mode

Observation of one or more food safety defects will fail the sample set and alter the classification of Normal test mode. The CFIA shall be notified whenever there is a failure to maintain Normal mode status.

There shall be an increase in the test frequency for FPS-FS I defects any time the Evisceration Performance Test fails and enters Tightened mode. These tests shall be performed as part of corrective action initiative to validate control of the failure. Immediately following each of the initial two Tightened mode Evisceration Performance tests, an FPS-FS I test shall also be performed. Provided the Tightened Mode tests are both successful, FPS-FS I may then return to random testing frequency. Any continued failures of the Evisceration test would require continued increased FPS-FS I testing frequency while in Normal mode.

Small establishments that are testing at a Normal frequency and have a failure must have an additional test in half an hour to verify performance. A failure of this additional test will cause a change of mode to Tightened. An accepted score will result in a return to normal test frequency.

Tightened Mode

Upon entering tightened mode from the Normal mode, the operator shall immediately identify and hold only the production lot associated with the test failure for rework procedures. The CFIA shall be notified.

Tightened mode is maintained until the operator has passed five consecutive satisfactory tests performed at 15 minute intervals. In each carcass sample set the carcasses shall be examined for food safety defects only and all carcasses in the set shall be examined regardless of how many food safety defects are noted. After five consecutive satisfactory tests, the operator may return to Normal Mode.

Reduced Mode (Elective)

Reduced mode is achieved after 10 consecutive satisfactory tests in Normal mode (the operator may elect to remain in Normal mode). If a food safety defect is found on any carcass in a sample set while in Reduced mode, the test shall fail and the operator shall return to Normal mode. The associated lot shall be identified for rework procedures. All carcasses in the sample set shall be examined for food safety defects.

Additionally, small establishments that are testing at a reduced frequency and have a failure must shift to Normal mode and have an additional test in half an hour before returning to the usual testing frequency of once per half shift.

Note

If while in FPS Reduced mode there is an Evisceration Performance test failure with a subsequent mode change from Reduced to Normal mode or Normal to Tightened mode, the FPS-FS I test frequency shall change as described under section 5.2.4. There is no change to FPS-FS I test mode status unless there is a subsequent test failure (See Appendix C).

10.2.3 FPS-FS II Test Modes

The test for FS category II defects shall be performed concurrently on the same carcasses as those selected for the FPS-FS I and FPS-OC test. Therefore, all carcasses sampled for FPS evaluation shall also be evaluated for the presence of any FS category II defects.

There is a zero acceptance for the presence of any FS category II defect. Any defects, regarless of their type, shall be sanitarily removed before the carcass sample set is released. Normally, only the sample set shall be refurbished and no rework of the associated lot shall occur.

Should the veterinarian determine that more than just the sample set may be affected by the presence of an FS II defect s/he may instruct the operator to conduct a full rework on the associated lot of carcasses.

10.2.4 Corrective Actions for Food Safety I (FS I) Defects

Refer to Appendix C: Decision Tree for Food Safety Category I Defects. For details on lot rework, refer to section 11.

Normal Mode

In Normal mode a lot failure occurs upon any FS 1 failures. The production lot associated with the failed test shall be detained and identified for rework procedures. Carcasses in the failed sample set shall be re-conditioned to edible standards prior to being released. The operator shall suspend random sampling and notify the CFIA of the failure.

Tightened Mode

In Tightened mode random testing is suspended and the first test shall occur within 15 minutes of the previous failed Normal mode test. Testing shall continue every 15 minutes until five consecutive successful tests have been performed. Lot size changes to 15 minutes of production while in Tightened mode. While in Tightened mode all failed tests shall require that the associated lot be identified for rework. Carcasses in the failed sample set shall be satisfactorily re-conditioned prior to being released. The CFIA shall be notified of each test failure.

Reduced Mode (Elective)

In Reduced mode, a production lot failure occurs upon the first failed test of a carcass sample set and the associated lot is subject to rework procedures. The carcass sample set shall be sanitarily refurbished prior to being released. A reduction in status to Normal Mode occurs.

FPS Test Failure Associated With Evisceration Test

Any FPS-FS I test failure that occurs in association with the ISO Evisceration test shall be treated in accordance with the ISO switching rules for the particular mode in which FPS was operating at the time of the test failure.

10.2.5 Corrective Actions for Food Safety II Defects

Normally, only the sample set shall be refurbished and no rework shall occur.

Should the veterinarian determine that more than just the sample set may be affected by the presence of an FS II defects/he may instruct the operator to conduct a full rework on the associated lot of carcasses. All FPS-FS II and any coincidental FS I or OC defect must be removed from the carcass sample set prior to being released.

Corrective actions may include but are not limited to:

  • increased frequency of testing;
  • placing an additional trimmer on line until the normal test index (yet to be established) is restored;
  • review of ante-mortem screening procedures; and
  • employee counselling/re-training.

10.3 Finished Product Standards – Other Carcass (FPS-OC) Defects Testing

FPS-OC defects are conditions that are regarded as unsuitable for public consumption and/or fail to meet regulatory requirements. FPS-OC defects may be conditions of farm origin (such as old fractures, scar tissue, skin irritations or minor or major bruising) or they may occur as a result of transportation, live animal handling, stunning, and/or dressing procedure failures.

The operator shall perform carcass tests for FPS-OC defects on each production lot during each production shift. These tests shall be performed on a random basis and may be conducted at the same time and include the same sample set that is being used to conduct the FS I and FS II defect test. FPS-OC testing shall be performed off-line or online according to the line speed criteria noted in section 10.1. FPS-OC test results are to be recorded on form CFIA HIP 006. A reduction in testing frequencies may occur in this category based upon operator performance.

All defects shall be removed in a sanitary manner before the sample set it released.

10.3.1 FPS-OC Defect Scoring

The scoring criteria for FPS-OC defects are provided in Table 10.2.

Dry adhesions, localized skin conditions and resolved scar tissue less than 5.0 cm in the greatest dimension (GD), healed fractures, small bone fragments, and fractures created during dressing procedures are disregarded and not scored as FPS-OC defects. These lesions do not normally require trimming unless they are associated with unsuitable haemorrhage, bruising, etc. The hair that may be around the leg near where the shackle was shall not be scored.

Each major defect scores 10 and each minor defect scores 2 except for applicable organ remnants, toenails, interdigital space, skin conditions and mammary tissue which score 5. Organ remnant is defined as any abdominal or thoracic viscera including the aorta and the pizzle.

Table 10.2 Scoring Criteria for FPS-OC Defects
Non Conformance Minor Defect Description Major Defect
Stains (e.g. bile, oil, rust) ≤ 4 cm GD > 4 cm GD
Blood clots > 4 cm to ≤ 15 cm GD > 15 cm GD
Bruising > 2.5 cm, ≤ 6 cm GD & ≤ 2.5 cm deep > 6 cm GD & > 2.5 cm deep
Extraneous material ≤ 10 cm2 area of smear of dust or ≤ 15 specks in an area of 50 cm2. Insects (flies, mosquitoes, etc.) = 1 minor each > 10 cm2 of smear of dust; or > 15 specks in an area of 50 cm2
Hair (scalded carcass) 5-10 strands in a 50 cm2 area > 10 strands in a 50 cm2 area
Hide (dehided carcass) ≤ 5 cm GD >5 cm GD
Mutilation
(complete break in skin)
≥ 5 cm to ≤ 7.5 cm GD > 7.5 cm GD
Scar tissue/adhesions ≥ 5 cm to ≤ 7.5 cm GD > 7.5 cm GD
Organ remnant Table Note 4 ≥ 5 cm to ≤ 7.5 cm GD > 7.5 cm GD
Toenails or interdigital spaces Table Note 4 1 > 1
Skin conditions Table Note 4 (unmarked) seedy belly, urine burn, etc. ≥ 5 cm to ≤ 10 cm GD > 10 cm GD
Mammary tissue Table Note 4 non-lactating ≤ 20 cm GD > 20 cm GD
Fractures N/A Any fresh fracture not removed
Stick wounds N/A Any untrimmed stick wound

Table Notes

Table note 4

Minor except mammary tissue, organ remnants, skin conditions, interdigital spaces & nails are multiplied by 5.

Return to table note 4  referrer

  • Multiply each minor nonconformance by 2 except as noted in Footnote 5 below.
  • Multiply each major nonconformance by 10.
  • Add major and minor nonconformance.
  • Acceptance and Rejection Numbers are provided in Table 10.3.
  • If what is found is less than the minimum minor size or count listed, do not score.
  • A maximum of 10 points (a major) is to be counted per category fo each carcass.

GD = greatest dimension

10.3.2 FPS-OC Acceptance and Rejection Numbers

The Acceptance and Rejection numbers for FPS-OC defects tests are provided in Table 10.3.

The lot associated with the sample set is accepted when the score or the test is equal to or less than the Acceptance Number.

The lot associated with the sample set is rejected when the score or the test is equal to greater than the Rejection Number. A rejected lot is also referred to as a failed lot.

Upon failing a FPS-OC test, whether in Regular or Relaxed mode, the operator shall immediately identify and only hold the production lot associated with the test failure for rework. The CFIA shall be notified. If the operator was in Relaxed mode, he shall return to Regular testing mode. The affected lot shall be reworked for the FPS-OC defect(s) that were identified in the failed test score.

Table 10.3 Acceptance and Rejection Numbers for FPS-OC Defect Tests
Operator Lot Size FPS-OC Sample Size Acceptance Number (lot is accepted with this score or less) Rejection Number (lot is rejected with this score or more)
< 200 2 11 12
200 to 299 3 17 18
300 to 399 4 23 24
400 to 499 5 29 30
500 or more 6 35 36

10.3.3 FPS-OC Defect Testing Modes and Corrective Actions

HIP Finished Product Standards Testing – Other Carcass Defects and resultant process actions are indicated in Appendix D: Decision Tree for HIP FPS-OC Defect Testing. For details on lot rework, refer to section 11.0.

Regular Mode

In Regular mode, the operator continues to randomly test each lot, (see table 4.1, or table 4.1a as applicable and table 10.3 for sample sizes and test frequencies), unless eligible to move to Relaxed mode. A test failure in Regular mode requires that the operator identify the associated lot and designate it for rework. Corrective actions shall be initiated by the operator. The CFIA shall be notified of the failure.

Relaxed Mode (Elective)

After 10 consecutive successful test scores in Regular mode, the operator may elect to move into Relaxed mode. The same number of carcasses shall be tested, but the testing frequency is reduced in accordance with Table 4.1 (note: the relaxed mode is not applicable to establishments processing 100 cph or less). A test failure in Relaxed mode requires that the operator identify only the current associated production lot for rework. The CFIA shall be notified of the failure.

11.0 Rework Procedures for Failed Lot(s)

The operator shall notify the CFIA when rework procedures are being performed on any detained lot. The frequency of rework procedure monitoring by the CFIA shall be at the discretion of the VIC. Operators and the CFIA shall refer to Appendix E – Decision tree for carcass rework for the details on process actions required for carcass product rework procedures.

The operator has the option to rework the entire lot associated with the FPS test failure (section 11.2) and verify the rework was effective through rework evaluation Or to subject the lot to verification testing (section 11.1). The operator's written program will clearly indicate how plant personnel will:

  • identify lots/sub-lots of carcasses subject to rework procedures;
  • rework or perform verification testing, as applicable to the rework procedure chosen by the operator;
  • evaluate rework; and
  • respond to any failure of the rework procedures.

Lots (sub-lots) under verification testing or under rework evaluation will normally be tested only for those defects that originally failed the FPS test sample set. However, in the case of FPS-FS I, finding of any zero tolerance defects (i.e. not only the FS I defect that originally failed the sample set, but also any other FS I) will fail the lot/sub-lot and lead to rework of the entire lot.

In all cases, any other defect (i.e. FPS-FS or OC defects not associated with the original lot failure) that is detected during rework procedures will also be sanitarily removed but not scored.

11.1 Lot Verification Testing

Under this elective option, the operator will carefully examine

the specific lots of carcasses retained for rework procedures for the presence of the defect that lead to the lot failure (OC) or in the case of FPS-FS I, any zero tolerance defects.

Note:
For FPS-FS I failures, the lot verification testing option can only be used when a failure occurred in Reduced or Normal mode. If the FPS-FS I failure occurred in Tightened mode, lot rework and evaluation must be implemented.

For lot verification testing, the operator will randomly select the specified number of carcasses for verification testing. The sample size should be representative of the entire population and should vary depending on the size of the original failed lot. Table 11.1 provides minimum sample size number of carcasses that shall be collected for the testing. The entire population of the lot shall have an equal opportunity of being selected for testing.

Table 11.1: Minimal number of carcasses to randomly collect for lot verification testing.
Number of carcass units per lot Minimal number of random samples to collect
2-15 2
16-25 3
26-90 5
91-150 8
151-280 13
281-500 20
500-1200 32
  • Rejection criteria: If one or more samples are rejected, regardless the number of carcasses sampled, the lot fails
  • If a defect is found in the lot, the lot will have to be fully reworked. See section 11.2 for the next steps.
  • If the lot is free of defects, the entire lot can be released for further processing.

A responsible plant employee shall inform the VIC/delegate whenever a failure occurs.

11.2 Lot Rework and Evaluation

When rework is to be performed, such as in case of a failure in Tightened mode for FPS-FS I testing or when rework is chosen in lieu of procedures in section 11.1 or when a failure is found during procedures of section 11.1, the operator may choose to rework the lot during the cooling process. Every carcass belonging to the lot shall be reworked at an appropriately equipped rework trim station as per section 12.2.10.

The operator will select one of the following options:

  • 1) The reworked lot may be kept intact or divided into sub-lots. Once the specified lot has been reworked for the appropriate defects, a minimum number of carcasses, as indicated in the table below, will be randomly selected from the reworked lot or sub-lot for evaluation . The entire population of each lot/sub-lot shall have an equal opportunity of being selected for testing. If the lot/sub-lot is less than 25 carcasses, the procedure in Subsection 11.2 (2) shall be followed. The operator must achieve a satisfactory test result before releasing the lot/sub-lot for further processing. All carcasses associated with a lot/sub-lot that failed the test shall be reworked once again. The reworked lot/sub-lot must be re-tested using the same statistical testing procedures and pass the test before the lot/sub-lot can be released for further processing.
    Table 11.2: Minimal number of random carcasses to collect for the rework evaluation.
    Number of carcass units per lot or sub-lot Minimal number of random samples to collect
    25-124 3
    125-149 4
    150-199 5
    200-349 6
    350-499 7
    500-649 8
    650-799 9
    800-949 10
    950-1099 11
    1100-1199 12
    More than 1200 13

    Rejection criteria: If one or more samples are rejected, regardless the number of carcasses sampled, the lot fails

    A responsible plant employee shall inform the VIC/delegate whenever a failure occurs.

  • 2) If the lot is reworked on-line prior to or upon leaving the carcass cooler area, immediately following the rework trim station procedure, every carcass shall be re-examined by an accredited plant employee at a properly equipped station. The plant employee shall verify that those defects that failed the entire lot and all FS I and II defects have been removed from each carcass during the initial rework trimming step. A carcass that fails the evaluation step shall be immediately isolated and reworked or reworked while on line (subject to VIC approval), and no carcass shall be released for shipping or further processing until it has been refurbished to edible standards or alternately deemed inedible. Only those carcasses which have passed both the first and second steps(i.e. trimming and evaluation) may be released for shipping or further processing.

11.3 CFIA Responsibilities for Rework & Rework Verification and Evaluation Testing

The CFIA will periodically monitor the rework procedure to ensure that the establishment is meeting the requirements of the HIP program. The frequency of CFIA rework monitoring shall be at the discretion of the VIC/delegate.

11.4 Voluntary Rework

Due to extraordinary circumstances beyond the operator's immediate control, certain groups of carcasses may be presented with non-food safety conditions on the evisceration floor that significantly bias that group towards failure of the performance standards for Finished Product Standards testing. In such circumstances and at the discretion of the VIC, the operator may request that such a group of affected carcasses be exempted from FPS testing provided the operator agrees to properly identify and retain the affected group for rework as described in this section. The exempted group of carcasses must pose no food safety concerns and the operator must have an established pre-approved procedure for the handling of such carcasses in the company's written program.

12.0 Facility Requirements

12.1 Facility and Resource Requirements

Plant management shall provide an approved facility that meets HIP and MOP construction standards. Before a facility can be approved for HIP operations, the responsible RVO and VIC shall review the facility to validate that all HIP facility standards are in compliance with the policy requirements. Once the facility review is completed and all material requirements are found to be in place, CFIA/industry staff training sessions shall be arranged. Once industry staff are trained and qualified, the operator shall carry out all functions and responsibilities designated to the establishment under the HIP.

12.2 Station Requirements

In addition to inspection facilities required under the Meat Inspection Act, Meat Inspection Regulations, 1990 and the MOP, the following additional facilities and equipment are required for the implementation of the HIP.

12.2.1 Mirrors

In establishments where maximum line speeds exceeds 200 cph, each CFIA carcass inspection station shall be equipped with one or more distortion free mirror(s) of sufficient size to provide a clear unobstructed view of the entire dorsal surface of the largest carcass processed. The horizontal width of the mirror shall be at least 4 feet/inspection station equivalent to that of the CFIA inspection station(s). The mirror system can be a one piece tiltable mirror or a two piece canted mirror that allows visualization of the round and back of the carcass. In either case, the mirror system shall be placed far enough from the vertical plane of the carcass to allow the carcass to be turned without contacting the mirror but close enough to provide the required view of the carcass. Where special circumstances allow, the mirror requirement may be waived with the acceptance of the VIC and agreement of the RVO.

The installation of a distortion free mirror at the plant detector station is optional. However, the operator shall ensure that all parts of the carcass are visualized and examined for defect detection.

See subsection 12.2.5 for Evisceration testing station mirror requirements.

The operator shall maintain the cleanliness of all mirrors so visualization of the carcass is possible.

12.2.2 Lighting

It is recommended that the minimum lighting at all inspection and HIP accredited stations be 1000 lux with a minimum Colour Rendering Index (CRI) of 85.

A minimum of 540 lux of shadow-free lighting with a minimum CRI of 85 is required at each CFIA post-mortem inspection station, at each company carcass defect detection station and at the Presentation testing station.

Directional lighting may also be required at the CFIA carcass inspection station and the company detector station to ensure sufficient light is present within the thoracic cavity of the carcass as it passes through the station.

A minimum of 1000 lux is required at the Evisceration testing station(s), the FPS testing station, the carcass rework station(s) and the rework verification station.

12.2.3 Carcass Center Spacing

The minimum distance between swine carcass centers shall be 61.0 cm (24 in).

12.2.4 Table Width

The table or trays shall be wide and long enough to allow for the proper inspection of viscera and to prevent any interference and/or common contact between viscera from adjacent carcasses.

12.2.5 Evisceration Test Station

The space allocated for evisceration testing shall have a minimum length of 92 cm (3 ft), have lighting standards as noted in subsection 12.2.2, and shall safely accommodate 2 people. The station shall be positioned close enough to the carcass line (comfortable arm's length) to allow the tester to manipulate the carcass if necessary. The Evisceration testing station shall be located directly after the process step it evaluates and prior to any alteration to the carcass that would remove or distort the presence of the defects being evaluated. A sanitizer is not required because no trimming is performed at this station.

In establishments where the line speed exceeds 200 cph, a one or two piece distortion free mirror shall be installed at this station to allow for clear visualization of the upper half of the carcass including the tail base, hams and upper back. Where special circumstances allow, the mirror requirement may be waived with the acceptance of the VIC and agreement of the RVO.

12.2.6 Company Employee Presentation Testing Stations

For Presentation testing of heads (MLN), viscera and carcasses, each testing station requires a minimum length of 92 cm (3 ft) and shall safely accommodate two people. Presentation testing stations shall be located next to and upstream from the respective CFIA inspection stations.

12.2.7 CFIA Inspection Stations

Each CFIA inspection station [for head (MLN), viscera and carcass inspection] requires a minimum 1.52 m (5 ft) of dedicated work space. Each station shall have a complete hand wash facility and a sanitizer shall also be provided if hand tools are used for inspection.

In establishments where the line speed exceeds 900 cph, a minimum 1.83 m (6 ft) of dedicated work space is required for each CFIA inspection station.

The CFIA Veterinary held rail station shall provide a minimum 2.44 m (8 ft) of dedicated work space and shall be equipped with a complete hand wash facility and sanitizer. The size of this station must be adequate for the establishment's slaughter process capacity.

Note

All CFIA inspection stations are under ergonomic review, and resulting information from these studies may require changes to existing work station requirements.

12.2.8 Finished Product Standards (FPS) Testing Station

Regardless of whether FPS testing is performed off-line or online, the FPS testing station shall be located downstream from the CFIA and company held rails but before the final carcass wash cabinet. This station shall be configured so the test monitor performing the FPS test has access to all parts of the carcass and the station shall be large enough to safely accommodate two people. The station shall be equipped with safety rails, a minimum light intensity of 1000 lux (shadow-free lighting with a minimum CRI of 85) and a clipboard holder.

In establishments where line speeds exceeds 200 cph, the FPS testing station shall be located off the main chain and be of adequate length to collect, inspect and hold the required number of carcasses for a sample set based on ISO sampling plan 2859-1 S-1. The off-line station shall be equipped with a sanitizer and a complete hand wash facility.

In establishments operating at 200 cph or less, FPS testing may be performed online. In those plants where FPS testing is performed on the moving line, the operator's written program shall set out a means of identifying all carcasses in the sample set that are found to have pathological FPS defects that do not pose a contamination concern when exposed to the carcass washer, before they pass through the carcass wash cabinet. These carcasses shall be effectively isolated in the carcass cooler and refurbished.

12.2.9 Carcass Rework Holding Capacity

The operator shall demonstrate their capability of maintaining complete control of rejected lots that enter the carcass cooler. The operator shall provide sufficient rail space to hold the detained lot(s) under full control until each lot is reworked to acceptable standards.

12.2.10 Carcass Rework Trim Station

An acceptable area that will allow effective rework of the detained carcasses shall be provided prior to further processing or shipping of chilled carcasses. The carcass rework station may be a permanent or mobile station. Regardless, it shall be adequately equipped with a sanitizer, record holder, 1000 lux lighting and convenient access to complete hand wash facilities. The stand shall not contact the carcasses and must be located in an open area acceptable to the VIC.

12.2.11 Rework Verification Station

This station requires a minimum length of 92 cm (3 ft) to safely accommodate two people and shall be equipped with 1000 lux lighting. The station can be located in the carcass cooler or immediately following the rework trim station when rework is done at the entrance to the processing room. The station must provide the monitor with access to all parts of the carcass.

12.2.12 Speed Display Meter

An accurate digital line speed (chain speed) indicator for the main carcass dressing chain must be provided on the slaughter floor in a location that is convenient and visually accessible for recording purposes. A 1% margin of error shall be allowed for inherent variations in the system.

Appendix A: Decision Tree for HIP Evisceration Performance Test

Click on image for larger view
Decision Tree for Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point-based Inspection Program Evisceration Performance Test. Description follows.

Description of the Decision Tree for HIP Evisceration Performance Test

Under the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point based slaughter inspection program for swine, dressed carcasses and their relevant portions must meet several performance criteria during the dressing process. These performance criteria (also referred to as standards) are measured at strategic locations in the dressing/inspection process using evisceration performance testing (bunging/viscera removal), Presentation Standards (abbreviated to "Presentation") testing, and Finished Product Standards testing.

This appendix provides a visual description of the policy on hazard analysis and critical control point based slaughter inspection program for swine evisceration performance testing as detailed in section 5 of Annex C, Chapter 17.

This decision tree consists of five boxes.

Box number one (1) – normal mode

  1. Continue random testing in normal mode unless one of the following occurs:
  2. If this is the tenth consecutive passed test, switch to the reduced mode (box number 2).
  3. If this is the second rejected test in the last 5 tests, implement corrective actions, notify the Canadian Food Inspection Agency and switch to tightened mode (box number 3). Increase finished product standards – food safety category 1 test frequency (for details see section 5.2.3)
  4. A failed test for small plants must be followed by another test in half an hour.

Box number two (2) – reduced mode (elective)

Continue in reduced mode as long as there are no failures.

  1. When a failure occurs, take corrective actions as deemed necessary, return to normal mode (box number 1). Suspend finished product standards – food safety category 1 and random evisceration testing. Perform 2 follow-up evisceration tests, the first within 15 minutes and the second 15 minutes later (half an hour for small plants). A finished product standards – food safety category 1 test shall be performed immediately after each of the two evisceration tests (as per section 5.2.3).
  2. When 2 consecutive evisceration tests pass, return to random testing in normal mode for evisceration. Resume random finished product standards – food safety category 1 testing provided finished product standards – food safety category 1 test has passed. Any failure of finished product standards – food safety category 1 see Appendix C.
  3. If any of the 2 evisceration tests fail, repeat the procedure described in A.

Box number three (3) – tightened mode

  1. Suspend random testing and implement corrective action(s) and retest within 15 minutes. Thereafter, retest every 15 minutes. Increase finished product standards – food safety category 1 test frequency as per section 5.2.4.
  2. If first test and next subsequent 4 tests pass, return to box number 1.
  3. If this is the second rejected test in a window of 5 tests while in Box number 3 go to box number 4.

Box number four (4) – tightened mode (continued)

  1. Notify veterinarian in charge (or delegate), reduce the line speed by 10%, initiate corrective action(s) and test in 15 minutes. Continue increased finished product standards – food safety category 1 test frequency.
  2. If the subsequent test is passed, increase line speed 10%. If the next subsequent 4 tests pass, return to box number 1.
  3. Any failure while in Box number 4 go to box number 5.

Box number five (5) – tightened mode (continued)

  1. The operation is deemed to be in questionable control. Consultation with the veterinarian in charge (or delegate) will determine if there will be a temporary stop of operations. An effective action plan shall be implemented. An additional 10% line speed reduction shall be applied.
  2. Increase line speed 10% for each passed test until normal line speed is obtained and return to box number 1 after 5 successful consecutive test results.
  3. Any test failure notify the veterinarian in charge.

Appendix B: Decision Tree for HIP Presentation Testing

Click on image for larger view
Decision Tree for Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point-based Inspection Program Presentation Testing. Description follows.

Description of the Decision Tree for HIP Presentation Testing

Under the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point based slaughter inspection program for swine, dressed carcasses and their relevant portions must meet several performance criteria during the dressing process. These performance criteria (also referred to as standards) are measured at strategic locations in the dressing/inspection process using evisceration performance testing (bunging/viscera removal), presentation standards (abbreviated to "presentation") testing, and finished product standards testing.

This appendix provides a visual description of the policy on hazard analysis and critical control point based slaughter inspection program for swine presentation performance testing as detailed in section 6, section 7, section 8 and section 9 of Annex C, Chapter 17.

This decision tree consists of five boxes.

Box number one (1) – normal mode

  1. Continue random testing in normal mode unless one of the following occurs:
  2. If this is the 10th consecutive passed test, switch to the reduced mode (box # 2).
  3. If this is the 2nd rejected test in the last 5 tests, implement corrective actions, notify the canadian food inspection agency and switch to tightened mode (box number 3).

Box number two (2) – reduced mode (elective)

Continue in reduced mode until the following occurs: when a reduced mode test fails, implement corrective actions and switch to normal mode (box number 1).

Box number three (3) – tightened mode

  1. Suspend random testing and implement corrective action(s) and test within 15 minutes. Thereafter, test every 15 minutes.
  2. If first test and next subsequent 4 tests pass, return to box number 1.
  3. If first test fails, implement corrective action(s) and test again in 15 minutes.
  4. If any 2 tightened mode tests are rejected in a window of 5 tests, go to box number 4.

Box number four (4) – tightened mode (continued)

  1. Notify veterinarian in charge (or delegate), reduce the line speed by 10%, initiate corrective action(s) and test in 15 minutes.
  2. If subsequent test passes, increase line speed 10%. If the next subsequent 4 tests pass, return to box number 1.
  3. Any subsequent test failure, go to box number 5.

Box number five (5) – tightened mode (continued)

  1. The operation is deemed to be in questionable control. Consultation with the veterinarian in charge (or delegate) will determine if there will be a temporary stop of operations. An effective action plan shall be implemented. An additional 10% line speed reduction shall be applied.
  2. Increase line speed 10% for each passed test until normal line speed is obtained and return to box number 1 after 5 successful consecutive test results.
  3. Any test failure notify the veterinarian in charge.

Appendix C: Decision Tree for HIP FPS – FS I Defect Testing

Click on image for larger view
Decision Tree for Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point-based Inspection Program Finished Product Standards – Food Safety 1 Defect Testing. Description follows.

Description of the Decision Tree for HIP FPS – FS I Defect Testing

Under the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point based slaughter inspection program for swine, dressed carcasses and their relevant portions must meet several performance criteria during the dressing process. These performance criteria (also referred to as standards) are measured at strategic locations in the dressing/inspection process using evisceration performance testing (bunging/viscera removal), presentation standards (abbreviated to "presentation") testing, and finished product standards testing.

This appendix provides a visual description of the policy on hazard analysis and critical control point based slaughter inspection program for swine presentation performance testing as detailed in section 10 of Annex C, Chapter 17.

This decision tree consists of five boxes.

Box number one (1) – normal mode

  1. Continue random testing in normal mode unless one of the following occurs:
  2. If this is the 10th consecutive passed test, switch to the reduced mode (box number 2).
  3. If test is rejected, implement corrective actions, identify/detain lot for rework, notify the canadian food inspection agency and switch to tightened mode (box number 3).
  4. A failed test for small plants must be followed by another test in half an hour.

Box number two (2) – reduced mode (elective)

Continue in reduced mode as long as there are no failures. When a failure occurs, detain associated lot for rework procedures(fecal/ingesta/milk only), implement corrective action(s) as required, and go to box number 1. Consult Appendix E: Decision tree for carcass product rework. For small plants, a failed test must be followed by a test in normal mode in half an hour.

Box number three (3) – tightened mode

  1. Suspend random testing and implement corrective action(s) and test within 15 minutes. Thereafter, test every 15 minutes.
  2. If first test and next subsequent 4 tests pass, return to box number 1.
  3. Upon a failure while in tightened mode go to box number 4 and immediately identify the failed lot associated with the test for rework procedures.

Box number four (4) – tightened mode (continued)

  1. If this is the 2nd rejected test in a window of 5, notify veterinarian in charge (or delegate), reduce the line speed by 10%, initiate corrective action(s) and test in 15 minutes. If any further failures occur go to # 5A
  2. If subsequent test passes, increase line speed 10%. If the next subsequent 4 tests pass, return to box number 1.
  3. If there is any failure while in tightened mode, detain lot for rework.

Box number five (5) – tightened mode (continued)

  1. The operation is deemed to be in questionable control. Consultation with the veterinarian in charge (or delegate) will determine if there will be a temporary stop of operations. An effective action plan shall be implemented. An additional 10% line speed reduction shall be applied.
  2. Increase line speed 10% for each passed test until normal line speed is obtained and return to box number 1 after 5 successful consecutive test results.
  3. Any test failure, detain lot for rework, notify the veterinarian in charge.

Note: Any finished product standard of food safety category 1 testing failure resulting from tests related to Appendix A, Evisceration test, shall be treated in accordance with the International Organization for Standardization switching rules for the particular mode in which finish product standard was operating at the time of the test failure.

Appendix D: Decision Tree for HIP FPS – OC Defect Testing

Click on image for larger view
Decision Tree for Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point-based Inspection Program Finished Product Standards – Other Carcass Defect Testing. Description follows.

Description of the Decision Tree for HIP FPS – OC Defect Testing

Under the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point based slaughter inspection program for swine, dressed carcasses and their relevant portions must meet several performance criteria during the dressing process. These performance criteria (also referred to as standards) are measured at strategic locations in the dressing/inspection process using evisceration performance testing (bunging/viscera removal), presentation standards (abbreviated to "presentation") testing, and finished product standards testing.

This appendix provides a visual description of the policy on hazard analysis and critical control point based slaughter inspection program for swine finished product standards of other carcass defects testing as detailed in section 10 of Annex C, Chapter 17.

This decision tree consists of three boxes.

Box number one (1) – regular mode

  1. Randomly test the prescribed number of carcasses at the prescribed frequency (see table 4.1 or 4.1a)
  2. If this is the 10th consecutive passed test, go to box number 2.
  3. If the test failed, notify the canadian food inspection agency, go to box number 3.

Box number two (2) – relaxed mode

  1. Randomly test the required number of carcasses at the prescribed frequency (see table 4.1 or 4.1a).
  2. If this was a successful test, retain relaxed sampling mode.
  3. If the test failed, notify the canadian food inspection agency, go to box 3 and return to regular mode at the prescribed frequency.

Box number three (3) – failed sample set

  1. Identify the last half hour or 1 hour of production for rework based on regular mode lot size. (Note: for establishments operating at 100 carcasses or less per hour, the lot size for rework is 1 hour).
  2. Go to box number 1.
  3. Consult Appendix E for carcass product rework.

Appendix E: Decision Tree for HIP Carcass Rework

Rework procedures for failed lots:
Food Safety (FPS-FS) defects or other carcass (FPS-OC) defects

The CFIA shall be notified when any lot rework procedure is scheduled to occur.

Lot verification testing section 11.1:

Note:
The lot verification testing option can only be used when a failure occurred in Reduced or Normal mode for FPS-FS I. If the failure occurred in Tightened mode, lot rework and evaluation must be implemented.

  1. Determine the lot size and identify/segregate in accordance with the HIP policy.
  2. Utilize the random sampling procedure in accordance with the HIP policy to select the appropriate number of carcasses from the lot for verification testing. If the defect that caused the failure is not detected (OC defect that caused the failure or any zero tolerance defects), release the lot. If the defect is detected the entire lot associated with the initial FPS test failure will have to be reworked.
  3. Rework and testing procedures continue until the lot passes.

Lot rework and evaluation section 11.2.1:

In cooler rework

  1. Rework every carcass in the lot for the defect(s) that produced the failure.
  2. Utilize the random sampling procedure in accordance with the HIP policy to select the appropriate number of carcasses from the reworked lot for test. If the defect that caused the failure is not detected (OC defect that caused the failure or any zero tolerance defects), release the lot. If the defect is detected redo rework and test until the lot passes.

Online cooler rework section 11.2.2:

  1. Rework every carcass in the lot for the defect(s) that produced the failure (OC defect that caused the failure or any zero tolerance defects).
  2. Every reworked carcass shall be immediately re-examined by an accredited employee located at an approved on line verification station. Any defects found shall be immediately removed prior to the release of the carcass for further processing or shipping.

Appendix F: CFIA HIP Forms

CFIA HIP 001: HIP ISO Evisceration Test

PDF (19 kb)

Click on image for larger view
Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point-based Inspection Program International Organization for Standardization Evisceration Test form 001. Description follows.

Description of the HIP ISO Evisceration Test form

As per the information under section 5.2 of the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point based slaughter inspection program for swine (Annex C, Chapter 17), all evisceration performance test results are to be recorded on this form.

This form consists of a table for recording the results of 15 tests. The following general information is captured in the header section of the form: the date; the establishment number; the working shift; the allowed line speed. For each test performed, the following information is captured: the current line speed; the time and the initials of the person performing the test; the test mode, that is tightened, normal or reduced; the sample size; the accept or reject value; the number of evisceration defects, that is, the number of fecal and ingesta defects found.

All corrective actions are to be recorded on the back of the form, or on an attached or referenced document.

CFIA HIP 002A: HIP ISO Presentation Testing – Heads (MLN presented on head)

PDF (31 kb)

Click on image for larger view
Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point-based Inspection Program International Organization for Standardization Presentation Testing – Heads (mandibular lymph nodes presented on heads) form. Description follows.

Description of the HIP ISO Presentation Testing – Heads (MLN presented on head) form

As per the information under section 6.0, section 7.3 and section 7.4 of the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point based slaughter inspection program for swine (Annex C, Chapter 17), all results of presentation performance test for heads presented with mandibular lymph nodes are to be recorded on this form.

This form consists of a table for recording the results of 16 tests. The following general information is captured in the header section of the form: the date; the establishment number; the working shift; the allowed line speed. For each test performed, the following information is captured: the current line speed; the time and the initials of the person performing the test; the test mode, that is tightened, normal or reduced; the sample size; the accept or reject value; the number of defects found in each of the following 5 categories; more than 50% of one mandibular lymph node in the wrong location; more than 50% of one mandibular lymph node obscured from view; more than 50% of one mandibular lymph node missing; head detached from the carcass; head rotated more than 45 degrees; head in excess motion; and the score.

All corrective actions are to be recorded on the back of the form, or on an attached or referenced document.

CFIA HIP 002B: HIP ISO Presentation Test – Heads (MLN presented off heads)

PDF (28 kb)

Click on image for larger view
Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point-based Inspection Program International Organization for Standardization Presentation Test – Heads (mandibular lymph nodes presented off heads) form. Description follows.

Description of the HIP ISO Presentation Test – Heads (MLN presented off heads) form

As per the information under section 6.0 and section 7.3 of the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point based slaughter inspection program for swine (Annex C, Chapter 17), all results of presentation performance test for heads presented without mandibular lymph nodes are to be recorded on this form.

This form consists of a table for recording the results of 16 tests. The following general information is captured in the header section of the form: the date; the establishment number; the working shift; the allowed line speed. For each test performed, the following information is captured: the current line speed; the time and the initials of the person performing the test; the test mode, that is tightened, normal or reduced; the sample size; the accept or reject value; the number of defects found in each of the following 3 categories; more than 50% of one mandibular lymph node in the wrong location; more than 50% of one mandibular lymph node obscured from view; more than 50% of one mandibular lymph node missing; and the score.

All corrective actions are to be recorded on the back of the form, or on an attached or referenced document.

CFIA HIP 003A: HIP ISO Presentation Test – Viscera (Hook and Pan)

PDF (33 kb)

Click on image for larger view
First page of the Food Product Sampling Submission Form. Description follows.

Description of the HIP ISO Presentation Test – Viscera (Hook and Pan) form

As per the information under section 6.0, section 8.1 and section 8.2 of the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point based slaughter inspection program for swine (Annex C, Chapter 17), all results of presentation performance test for viscera presented on hook an pan are to be recorded on this form.

This form consists of a table for recording the results of 8 tests for red offal and 8 tests for grey offal. The following general information is captured in the header section of the form: the date; the establishment number; the working shift; the allowed line speed. For each test performed, the following information is captured: the current line speed; the time and the initials of the person performing the test; the test mode, that is tightened, normal or reduced; the sample size; the accept or reject value; and the score. For red offal (lungs, liver and heart) the number of defects found in each of the following 5 categories is recorded: more than 90 degrees rotation of the pluck from standard; more that 50% of any organ missing; improper pluck suspension as per standard; pericardial sac not incised; contamination of red offal by gastro intestinal track content. For grey offal (mesenteric lymph node chain, spleen and hepatic node) the number of defects found in each of the following 5 categories: grey offal not in normal quadrant or rotated more than 45 degrees; more that 50% of any organ missing; more than 50% of any organ not visible; any grey offal outside pan; not possible to visualize grey offal due to contamination.

All corrective actions are to be recorded on the back of the form, or on an attached or referenced document.

CFIA HIP 003B: HIP ISO Presentation Test – Viscera (Tray / Table)

PDF (35 kb)

Click on image for larger view
Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point-based Inspection Program International Organization for Standardization Presentation Test – Viscera (Tray / Table) form. Description follows.

Description of the HIP ISO Presentation Test – Viscera (Tray / Table) form

As per the information under section 6.0, section 8.1 and section 8.2 of the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point based slaughter inspection program for swine (Annex C, Chapter 17), all results of presentation performance test for viscera presented in a tray or on a table are to be recorded on this form.

This form consists of a table for recording the results of 8 tests for red offal and 8 tests for grey offal. The following general information is captured in the header section of the form: the date; the establishment number; the working shift; the allowed line speed. For each test performed, the following information is captured: the current line speed; the time and the initials of the person performing the test; the test mode, that is tightened, normal or reduced; the sample size; the accept or reject value; and the score. For red offal (lungs, liver, heart and kidneys if they are not inspected in the carcass) the number of defects found in each of the following 6 categories (as applicable) is recorded: red offal not in normal quadrant or rotated more than 45 degrees from standard; more that 50% of any organ missing; dorsal surface of lung not visible; dorsal surface of liver not visible; contamination of red offal by gastro intestinal track content; 50% of each kidney missing or not exposed (if kidneys inspected on the tray or table). For grey offal (mesenteric lymph node chain, spleen and hepatic node) the number of defects found in each of the following 5 categories: grey offal not in normal quadrant or rotated more than 45 degrees from standard; more that 50% of any organ missing; more than 50% of any organ not visible; any grey offal outside tray or table; not possible to visualize grey offal due to contamination.

All corrective actions are to be recorded on the back of the form, or on an attached or referenced document.

CFIA HIP 004A: HIP ISO Presentation Test – Carcass (MLN presented on heads)

PDF (32 kb)

Click on image for larger view
Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point-based Inspection Program International Organization for Standardization Presentation Test – Carcass (mandibular lymph nodes presented on heads) form. Description follows.

Description of the HIP ISO Presentation Test – Carcass (MLN presented on heads) form

As per the information under section 9.0 of the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point based slaughter inspection program for swine (Annex C, Chapter 17), all results of presentation performance test for carcass with mandibular lymph nodes presented on head are to be recorded on this form.

This form consists of a table for recording the results of 16 tests. The following general information is captured in the header section of the form: the date; the establishment number; the working shift; the allowed line speed. For each test performed, the following information is captured: the current line speed; the time and the initials of the person performing the test; the test mode, that is tightened, normal or reduced; the sample size; the accept or reject value; and the score. The number of defects found in each of the following 4 categories is recorded: carcass sides not attached; unsplit; more than 45 degrees rotation; more than 50% of each kidney is missing or is not exposed.

All corrective actions are to be recorded on the back of the form, or on an attached or referenced document.

CFIA HIP 004B: HIP ISO Presentation Test – Carcass (MLN presented off heads)

PDF (34 kb)

Click on image for larger view
Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point-based Inspection Program International Organization for Standardization Presentation Test – Carcass (mandibular lymph nodes presented off heads) form. Description follows.

Description of the HIP ISO Presentation Test – Carcass (MLN presented off heads) form

As per the information under section 9.0 of the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point based slaughter inspection program for swine (Annex C, Chapter 17), all results of presentation performance test for carcass with mandibular lymph nodes presented off head are to be recorded on this form.

This form consists of a table for recording the results of 16 tests. The following general information is captured in the header section of the form: the date; the establishment number; the working shift; the allowed line speed. For each test performed, the following information is captured: the current line speed; the time and the initials of the person performing the test; the test mode, that is tightened, normal or reduced; the sample size; the accept or reject value; and the score. The number of defects found in each of the following 5 categories is recorded: carcass sides not attached; unsplit; more than 45 degrees rotation; more than 50% of each kidney is missing or is not exposed; head detached from carcass.

All corrective actions are to be recorded on the back of the form, or on an attached or referenced document.

CFIA HIP 005: HIP ISO Finished Product Standards Test – Food Safety Defects

PDF (17 kb)

Click on image for larger view
Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point-based Inspection Program International Organization for Standardization Finished Product Standards Test – Food Safety Defects form. Description follows.

Description of the HIP ISO Finished Product Standards Test – Food Safety Defects form

As per the information under section 10.0 of the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point based slaughter inspection program for swine (Annex C, Chapter 17), all results of finished product standards performance test for food safety defects of type 1 and 2 performed on carcass are to be recorded on this form.

This form consists of a table for recording the results of 10 tests. The following general information is captured in the header section of the form: the date; the establishment number; the working shift; the allowed line speed. For each test performed, the following information is captured: the current line speed; the time and the initials of the person performing the test; the test mode, that is tightened, normal or reduced; the sample size; the accept or reject value; and the score. The number of defects found in category 1 and 2 is recorded.

Note: every carcass selected for finished product standards testing shall be examined for pathology. The test monitor shall have a Canadian Food Inspection Agency veterinarian confirm the diagnosis of any pathological defect and then the monitor shall record the veterinarian's diagnosis on the finished product standards food safety (005) or the finished product standards other carcass defects form (006). The monitor must ensure the same pathology is not double recorded on both the finished product standards food safety and the finished product standards forms. All pathology must be sanitarily removed prior to the release of the carcass.

All corrective actions are to be recorded on the back of the form, or on an attached or referenced document.

CFIA HIP 006: HIP ISO Finished Product Standards Test – Other Carcass Defects

PDF (71 kb)

Click on image for larger view
Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point-based Inspection Program International Organization for Standardization Finished Product Standards Test – Other Carcass Defects form

Description of the HIP ISO Finished Product Standards Test – Other Carcass Defects form

As per the information under section 10.0 of the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point based slaughter inspection program for swine (Annex C, Chapter 17), all results of finished product standards performance test for other carcass defects performed on carcass are to be recorded on this form.

This form consists of a table for recording the results of 4 tests. The following general information is captured in the header section of the form: the date; the establishment number; the working shift; the allowed line speed. For each test performed, the following information is captured: the current line speed; the time and the initials of the person performing the test; the test mode, that is tightened, normal or reduced; the sample size; the accept or reject value; and the score. The number of defects found in each of the following categories is also recorded: stains (for example bile, oil, rust); blood clots; bruising; extraneous material; hide; hair; mutilation; scar tissue; adhesions; organ remnant; toenails or interdigital space; unmarked skin conditions (for example seedy belly, urine burn et cetera); mammary tissue (non lactating); fracture; stick wound.

Note: every carcass selected for finished product standards testing shall be examined for pathology. The test monitor shall have a Canadian Food Inspection Agency veterinarian confirm the diagnosis of any pathological defect and then the monitor shall record the veterinarian's diagnosis on the finished product standards food safety (005) or the finished product standards other carcass defects form (006). The monitor must ensure the same pathology is not double recorded on both the finished product standards food safety and the finished product standards forms. All pathology must be sanitarily removed prior to the release of the carcass.

**Interactive versions of the HIP forms are available from CFIA staff.**

Appendix G: CFIA National Performance Standards for FPS Tests

Performance Standard – Evisceration Test

National Mean: Performance/100 Carcasses: 6/100

ISO AQL for Evisceration; Inspection Level S-4 (option: S-1 in plants operating at 100 cph or less): 6.5%

Performance Standard – Presentation Test

National Mean AQL: To be established

ISO AQL Viscera – interim; Inspection Level S-3: 15%

ISO AQL Carcass-interim; Inspection Level S-3: 6.5%

ISO AQL Heads-interim; Inspection Level S-3: 10

Performance Standard – Finished Product

National Performance Standard: per 100 carcasses: 1.5/100

ISO AQL Carcasses at Inspection level S-1: at least 4 %

Date modified: