Requirements for Captive Cervids Imported from the United States to Canada

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TAHD-DSAT-IE-2008-6-5
October 13, 2017

Amendment: Amendment to the Chronic Wasting Disease requirements

"Cervid" refers to members of the family: Cervidae; subfamily: Cervinae; subfamily: CapreolinaeFootnote 1, subfamily: Hydropotinae and subfamily: Muntiacinae.

1. General Requirements

  • 1.1. All cervids imported into Canada require an import permit, issued by a Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) office prior to the arrival of the shipment at a port of entry (Sections 12 and 160, Health of Animals Regulations).
  • 1.2. Cervids imported into Canada must be animals that have been born and raised in captivity as "captive cervids" and originate from herds, research stations, or collections that have been in existence for at least three years and in which there have been no additions of cervids from the wild since 2001.
  • 1.3. Captive cervids for import must originate from a herd that is a Certified Brucellosis-Free cervid herd and a Tuberculosis Accredited herd (captive cervid), according to United States (U.S.) Code of Federal Regulation (CFR) and Uniform Methods and Rules definitions.
  • 1.4. Captive cervids presented for import must be uniquely identified with at least two (2) forms of permanent identification. One of the animal identifications must be an official animal identification approved for use in cervids by USDA-APHIS, as described in the United States Code of Federal Register 9 CFR 55.25. This must be a nationally unique animal identification number that is linked to that animal in the CWD National Database or in an approved state database and must be able to link animals to herd of origin and all herds of residence. The second form of identification required for captive cervids presented for import is a numeric dangle tag that can be read at a distance. The dangle tag must correlate all permanent identification for the animal, as well as a description of the animal detailing species, breed if applicable, colour, sex, age, and any identifying marks, all of which must be recorded on the required health certificate.
  • 1.5. Captive cervids may only be imported into Canada from the United States if the animals are transported directly to the Canada–United States border from the place of origin in the United States where they were tested in accordance with the import permit.
  • 1.6. Captive cervids must be accompanied by a certificate of an official veterinarian of the United States or a certificate of a veterinarian licensed in the United States and endorsed by an official veterinarian of the United States. The certificate must contain the name and address of the consignor, the location from where the animal is exported, and the name and address of the consignee. The certificate must also clearly identify the animal and show that the animal was inspected by a veterinarian within 30 days preceding the date of importation, that the animal was found to be free from any communicable disease, and that the animal was, to the best of the knowledge and belief of the veterinarian, not exposed to any communicable disease within 60 days preceding the date of the inspection.
  • 1.7. An animal that was born after its mother was tested is not required to meet the test requirements in this document, if the animal is imported into Canada at the same time as its mother. An animal that was born after its mother was tested, unless it was born en route to Canada, must be identified with permanent identification and recorded on the health certificate of its mother.

2. Test Requirements for the Import of Captive Cervids

1. Brucellosis

  • Captive cervids for import to Canada must originate from a Certified Brucellosis Free cervid herd, according to U.S. CFR and Uniform Methods and Rules definitions.
  • The herd of origin, and any other herd from which the herd of origin sourced animals, must have been free from any clinical, diagnostic, or epidemiological evidence of brucellosis. The herd of origin must not contain animals that have been vaccinated for brucellosis.
  • The brucellosis test for the import of captive cervids to Canada is the buffered plate agglutination test (BPAT), except for reindeer®. tarandus), where the test must be the fluorescence polarization assay (FPA) test. Two (2) brucellosis tests conducted at least sixty (60) days and less than one hundred (100) days apart are required. The second brucellosis test must be performed within 30 days preceding the date of importation.
  • Every animal that tests positive on the BPAT must be removed from the shipment and tested negative with the complement fixation test at a dilution of 1:5 before negative BPAT herd mates are eligible for import.
  • All reindeer in a group under test must be negative; a single FPA-positive animal disqualifies all animals for import to Canada. The date and results of the two (2) brucellosis tests must be shown on the required health certificate for the animal to be imported.

2. Tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis)

Captive cervids for import to Canada must originate from a herd that is a Tuberculosis Accredited herd (captive cervid), according to U.S. CFR and Uniform Methods and Rules' definitions, except that any additions to Accredited herds from other herds must be supported by a whole test of all animals over one year of age within the preceding thirty-six (36) months with negative results.

The herd of origin, and any other herd from which the herd of origin sourced animals, must have been free from any clinical, diagnostic, or epidemiological evidence of tuberculosis.

The tuberculin test for the import of captive cervids is the single mid-cervical test (MCT) injection, using bovine PPD tuberculin with a reading of results at seventy-two (72) hours as "No Reaction". Two (2) tests conducted at least sixty (60) days and less than one hundred (100) days apart are required. The second test must be conducted within sixty (60) days of importation.

Every animal that is classified as a responder to the MCT must be removed from the shipment and classified as negative to a comparative cervical test (CCT), conducted at least sixty (60) days and less than hundred (100) days after response before negative MCT herd mates are eligible for import.

The date and results of the two (2) tuberculin tests must be shown on the required health certificate for the animal(s) to be imported.

3. Chronic Wasting Disease

  • The captive cervids must originate from a state which is recognized by the USDA-APHIS as having a herd certification program in compliance with their federal requirements as outlined in the United States Code of Federal Register 9 CFR Part 55;
  • and
    The animals must originate from a herd, in such a state, that has obtained Certified status;
  • and
    Chronic wasting disease has never been diagnosed in the enrolled herd and/or, if different, in the herd of origin of the animals intended for export;
  • and
    The animal(s) intended for export must not exhibit clinical signs of CWD at the time of certification and are not considered positive, exposed or suspect animals for CWD.

4. Bluetongue

  • Captive cervids imported from the state of Florida require a negative test for bluetongue, using the c-ELISA test methodology within thirty (30) days prior to import. In the case of a positive result, a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test must be performed with negative results for virus within 30 days of import. It is suggested that animals being sampled have both a serum sample and blood sample drawn at the same time and be sent to the lab with the request that, if the c-ELISA test is positive, then a PCR test is to be conducted.
  • The date and results of the bluetongue test must be shown on the required health certificate for the animals to be imported.
  • Captive cervids imported from states other than Florida do not require a test for bluetongue.

Certification Statements Required to Appear on the Health (Zoosanitary) Certificate for the Import of Captive Cervids from the United States

Currently, the Zoosanitary certificate referred to above is:

VS Form 17-140, United States Origin Health Certificate

In addition to animal identification and individual test results, the health certificate must document the following information:

  1. The health certificate must identify the:
    1. name and address of the consignor
    2. location from where the animals are exported
    3. name and address of the consignee
  2. The health certificate must state that animals were inspected by a veterinarian within 30 days preceding the date of importation, and it was determined that:
    1. The animals are free from any communicable disease.
    2. The animals are, to the best of the knowledge and belief of a veterinarian, not exposed to any communicable disease within sixty (60) days preceding the date of the inspection.
  3. Brucellosis
    1. The animals originate from a Certified Brucellosis Free cervid herd according to U.S. CFR and Uniform Methods and Rules definitions.

      Date of Herd Test: space

    2. The herd of origin does not contain any animals that were vaccinated for brucellosis.
  4. Tuberculosis
    1. The animals originate from a Tuberculosis Accredited herd (captive cervid), according to U.S. CFR and Uniform Methods and Rules definitions.

      Date of Herd Test: space

    2. Additions to the herd of origin were only natural increases or came from herds where there was a whole herd test of all animals over one year of age within the preceding thirty-six (36) months with negative results.
  5. Chronic Wasting Disease
    • The captive cervids originate from a state which is recognized by the USDA-APHIS as having a herd certification program in compliance with their federal requirements as outlined in the United States Code of Federal Register 9 CFR Part 55;
      and
      The animals originate from a herd, in such a state, that has obtained Certified status;
      and
      Chronic wasting disease has never been diagnosed in the enrolled herd and/or, if different, in the herd of origin of the animals intended for export;
      and
      The animal(s) intended for export do not exhibit clinical signs of CWD at the time of certification and are not considered positive, exposed or suspect animals for CWD.
  6. The herd of origin of the animals identified has been established for at least three years and is free from any clinical, diagnostic, or epidemiological evidence of brucellosis and tuberculosis.
    1. All animal(s) for export are natural increases to the herd of origin.
      or
    2. All animal(s) that are not natural increases to the herd of origin have been traced through all herds of residence, and all those herds of residence have been established to be free from brucellosis and tuberculosis.
  7. The animals are identified by a permanent identification system that allows them to be traced through all herds of residence. The animals are also identified by a numbered dangle tag that can be read at a distance, and this number is recorded beside permanent identification and description.
  8. The animals on this certificate are included on CFIA Import Number
    space

Qualification to Certification Statements

The actual permit issued for the import of a given group of captive cervids may impose additional requirements or may provide for variable certification to that listed above and should be consulted in the final preparation of an export document.

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