Chapter 5 - Export to the U.S.
5.9 Swine (updated September 2017)

This page is part of the Guidance Document Repository (GDR).

Looking for related documents?
Search for related documents in the Guidance Document Repository

Breeding/Feeder Swine
Health Certificate

1. The export certificate HA1938 Export of Swine to the United States must be used.

2. Exporters should be advised that individual states may have stricter requirements than the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). It is the exporter's responsibility to verify these conditions and to meet them. The exporter may contact the U.S. State veterinarian - PDF (185 kb) of the destination state to determine the state requirements and, among other things, whether an import permit or testing is required.

3. The swine must be inspected by the accredited veterinarian on the premises of origin within 14 days of export. After clinical examination, any swine displaying symptoms or evidence of contagious or infectious disease or exposure to contagious or infectious disease are not eligible to be certified for export to the U.S. The swine for export have not been exposed to communicable disease during the sixty (60) days prior to export.

4. Swine must originate from premises that have been free from classical swine fever (hog cholera) or swine plague during the 60 day period before the date of shipment.

5. All contiguous/adjacent premises to the premises of origin must have been free from classical swine fever (hog cholera) or swine plague during the 60 day period before the date of shipment.

6. Swine that are under quarantine for any disease are not eligible for export to the U.S.

7. Swine which are tested or inspected for export to U.S. must be identified with a tag/ indicator approved under the Livestock Identification and Traceability (TRACE) program. Health of Animals (HofA) ear tags or CFIA allocated premises numbers are not allowed anymore. Approved tags will bear the logo of the Canadian Pork Council (CPC). Identification requirements for swine being exported depend on the end use of the animal:

  1. Breeding animals may be identified with
    1. ear tags which bear a unique 15 digit number that follows the ISO 11784 standard format. These tags can be either electronic or non-electronic; or
    2. ear tags which bear an official 5 digit alphanumeric CPC-designated herd mark unique to the production site, with a secondary unique herd management identification number on the same tag.
  2. Feeder swine may be identified with
    1. ear tags which bear a unique 15 digit number that follows the ISO 11784 standard format. These tags can be either electronic or non-electronic; or
    2. ear tags which bear an official 5 digit alphanumeric CPC-designated herd mark unique to the production site; or
    3. ear tattoos or shoulder tattoos bearing a CPC-designated herd mark unique to the production site. If tattoos are used, they must be legible.

Exporters should be advised that it is preferable to verify that their tags or indicators are in compliance with state requirements by contacting the U.S. State veterinarian - PDF (185 kb).

8. There are no federal test requirements for swine exported to the U.S.

However some states have specific test requirements with respect to pseudorabies (Aujeszky's disease) and brucellosis for entry of swine into the state. Confirmation of state requirements is the responsibility of the exporter. To comply with these requirements, analyses must be performed by an accredited veterinarian, and sent to a laboratory accredited for this purpose within the time frame mandated by the state. Animals which are tested must have a unique identification number.

In those instances in which tests have been performed, a copy of the laboratory report is to be attached to HA1938.

Zoo Swine Species
Health Certification/ Certification procedures

9. The export certificate HA2230 Export of Zoo Swine Species to the United States must be used.

10. An import permit is required. Consult section 5.1 General for more information.

11. Canada must be free of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), Rinderpest, Classical Swine Fever, African Swine Fever, and Swine Vesicular Disease.

12. The swine intended for export to the United States have not been imported into Canada from countries designated by the USDA as affected with FMD, Rinderpest, African Swine Fever, Hog Cholera (Classical Swine Fever), or Swine Vesicular Disease; nor are they the first generation progeny of such imported swine.

13. The swine has been in Canada for at least 60 days immediately preceding the date of export to the United States.

14. For at least 60 days immediately preceding the time of movement from the premises of origin no Swine Erysipelas or Swine Plague (Pasteurellosis) has existed on the premise of origin or adjoining premises.

15. During the 60 days immediately preceding export, the swine have not had any contact with other swine or ruminants which would not qualify for export to the United States.

16. The swine were not vaccinated with any live or attenuated or inactivated vaccine during the 14 days preceding export to the United States.

17. The swine must be identified with a tag/ indicator approved under the National Livestock Identification and Traceability (TRACE) program. The tag/indicator must have a unique identification number which bears the official trademark of the responsible administrator (Pig Trace). The unique identification number must follow the ISO 11784 standard (15 digit unique number). In the health certificate, the tag/indicator is referred to as the permanent identifier. This tag/indicator must be accompanied by a second individual identification tag (plastic bangle tag). If an approved electronic button ear tag is used as permanent identifier, it can be used as the sole identifier if it can be read without restraining the animal.

18. Animals to be exported must be tested with negative results within 30 days of export for the following disease:

  1. Brucellosis: The sample must be sent to a CFIA approved laboratory and the Buffered Plate Antigen Test (BPAT) be selected for testing.
  2. Pseudorabies: The sample must be sent to the CFIA Winnipeg laboratory and the ELISA test must be selected. In order to submit this test to a CFIA laboratory, use Form CFIA/ACIA 5473 - Animal Health Import, Export and Artificial Insemination Specimen Submission. Consult Section 3.2 Serologic Testing for more information. An export notification number must be written on the request form. This notification number should be requested at the CFIA district office, and may be obtained from the area, either as a blanket notification for zoo swine to the USA or as a unique notification for this specific exportation. Contact the district office for more information.

19. Some states have specific test requirements for entry of swine into the state. Confirmation of state requirements is the responsibility of the exporter.

20. The attesting CFIA-accredited veterinarian has inspected the swine immediately before the date of export (within 24 hours) and found the swine to be free of evidence of infectious and communicable diseases and, as far as can be determined, exposure thereto during the preceding 60 days. The date of inspection is to be recorded on the certificate.

Wild Boar
Health Certification

21. The export certificate HA2228 Export of Wild Boars to the United States must be used.

22. During the 60-day period immediately preceding the day of export, the premises of origin or adjoining premises must be free of swine erysipelas or swine plague.

23. The animals must be isolated for a period of 30 days before export.

24. The wild boars for export were not previously imported into Canada from countries designated by the USDA as affected with foot and mouth disease, rinderpest, African swine fever, hog cholera, or swine vesicular disease.

25. The wild boars for export have been in Canada for a minimum of 60 days immediately preceding the date of export to the U.S.

26. The wild boars were not vaccinated with a live, an attenuated, or an inactivated vaccine during the 14 days preceding export to the U.S.

27. The animals must have a unique identification number. Identification requirements prescribed by regulation specified above for swine will apply to farmed wild boar on July 1st 2015.

28. Animals for export must be examined by an accredited veterinarian within the 30 days prior to the date of export.

29. The animals for export must be tested with negative results for brucellosis within the 30-day period before the date of export. The sample must be sent to a CFIA approved laboratory and the Buffered Plate Antigen Test (BPAT) be selected for testing

How to Complete the Canadian Health Certificate (HA1938, HA2228 and HA2230)

30. The accredited veterinarian must use the most recent version of the export certificate. The accredited veterinarian who inspected the animals must sign the health certificate.

31. When required, the U.S. import permit number must be entered in the appropriate section.

32. The date of the tests performed for certificate HA2230 must be indicated on the export certificate.

33. The results of tests that are performed to meet specific state requirements do not constitute part of the official certification and are not to appear on the export health certificate; however, the test results can be attached to the export document.

34. The accredited veterinarian must complete the export health certificate by entering all required information according to the directions provided above. The "Reference number" is assigned by the CFIA district office. The completed and signed health certificate will be submitted to a CFIA veterinary inspector to review and, if all requirements are met, it will be endorsed. Any incomplete export certificates will be returned to the accredited veterinarian for completion. A fee is charged for CFIA endorsement. The health certificate is valid for a period of 30 days from the date of the examination.

Swine for Immediate Slaughter to the U.S.

35. Inspection, testing or certification is not required for swine consigned from the port of entry directly to a slaughter facility. A statement signed by the exporter showing the farm(s) of origin and the approved U.S. slaughter plant to which the load is consigned must be presented to the USDA veterinarian at the port of entry. Although USDA has no identification requirements for swine exported for immediate slaughter, the exporter should be advised to check this information with the U.S. port of entry.

Inspections at U.S. Ports of Entry

36. Animals must be presented at the U.S. port of entry by appointment. The veterinarian at the port of entry will conduct a visual health examination of the animals and verify the identification of each animal as well as the information on the official health certificate.

37. Refer to Section 5.1 for the list of land ports of entry designated as having the necessary inspection facilities for the entry of animals from Canada. Although the list was provided by the USDA, it is the exporters' responsibility to present their animals to a U.S. port of entry that has the facilities required for the unloading and inspection of such animals.

References

Copies of export health certificates HA1938, HA2228, and HA2230 are available at the district office.

Date modified: