Videos: Safeguarding with Science

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency: Safeguarding with Science

An introduction to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency: Safeguarding with Science - Transcript/Captions

(Narrator voice over)

We're called the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, but the CFIA is much more than food.

(Montage: field of wheat, cow grazing, family eating breakfast at the kitchen table)

The CFIA is dedicated to safeguarding plants, animals and food. This enhances the health and well-being of Canada's people, environment and economy.That's our mission.

(Montage: bin of red peppers, CFIA employees carrying out various inspection activities in forests, fields and labs, people shopping in a grocery store)

(Sign on the side of the road: Canadian Food Inspection Agency 3851 Fallowfield, Canada)

The CFIA is also dedicated to excellence as a science-based regulator...trusted and respected by Canadians and the international community. That's our vision.

(Montage: Woman in a lab examining a petri dish, a man and a woman shaking hands, shipping containers, and cargo being loaded onto an airplane)

(Three animated icons: wheat, cow, and plate of food)

Safeguarding Canada's plants, animals and food demands modern approaches, and a focus on one mission-critical tool: Science.

(Text: The Canadian Food Inspection Agency: Safeguarding with Science)

(On screen speaker: Chief Food Safety Officer for Canada, Vice-President, Science, Dr. Martine Dubuc)

(Inset video at the top right of the screen showing CFIA employees carrying out various inspection activities)

Being science-based means being thorough. It means keeping your knowledge and tools current and making evidence-driven decisions. That science-based approach has earned the CFIA an international reputation in plant protection, animal health and food safety excellence.

(Narrator voice over)

(Montage: CFIA employees in lab coats carrying out various inspection activities in labs and plants)

Since 1997, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency has enforced Canada's federal plant health, animal health and food safety regulations and upheld the country's food safety standards.

(Map of Canada overlaid with illustrations of three CFIA employees: one in coveralls, one in a lab coat and the other in business attire)

Every day, more than six thousand CFIA professionals work to protect Canadians across the country. They help protect plant and animal health, prevent food safety hazards, manage food safety investigations and recalls, and help protect the marketplace from unfair practices.

(Text: 75,571 Samples Tested by Plant Labs in 2014-15)

The CFIA also plays an important role in shaping international standards, creating access to new markets, and facilitating trade, all while striving to be the most modern Agency possible.

(Text: 2014 Canadian Agricultural Exports: Over $56 Billion)

(Text: 4th Largest Exporter of Agricultural Commodities in the World)

(Three animated icons: wheat, cow, and plate of food)

(Chief Plant Health Officer for Canada, Darlene Blair is shown looking through a microscope, she turns to speaks to the camera)

Some people may not realize but part of our job is enforcing import and export controls. We protect the economy by working to keep plant pests out of the country, pests that could threaten our plants and crops, the first link in our food chain.

(Narrator voice over)

(Montage: cows on a farm, transport truck driving down the highway, inspector talking to a farmer)

The CFIA also helps protect Canada's animals from disease and regulates their humane transportation. It verifies that feeds are safe and vaccines are effective, and it manages animal disease incidents and emergencies.

(Speaker: Chief Veterinary Officer for Canada, Dr. Harpreet Kochhar onsite at a farm)

Our work is essential for a safe and accessible food supply. People may think of us as food inspectors, but our role is so much more than that. We practice biosecurity to protect and minimize risks to the country's land and aquatic animal resources.

(Narrator voice over)

(Montage: shipping yard, cargo ship, air plane in flight, inspectors in a lab setting, Canada's parliament building)

In the fast-changing global market, it's a real challenge to protect plant and animal health and safeguard food. Good science on the ground has to be complemented by modern legislation.

(Text: 4 Statutes, 13 Sets of Regulations)

(Text: Safe Food for Canadians Act and Regulations)

The Safe Food for Canadians Act streamlines Canada's food safety laws. Once the accompanying regulations come into force, they will strengthen the CFIA's authority to do its job even better within a consistent system that's focused on prevention.

(Montage: a man buying food at an outdoor market, group of people sitting around a boardroom table, nutrition information label, inside a supermarket, a chef [male] and a delivery driver [male] shake hands outside of a truck filled with potatoes)

To make sure stakeholders understand and benefit from the changes, the CFIA consulted with 10,000 Canadians on how to bring the Safe Food for Canadians Act into force. It also held consultations on how micro and small businesses might be affected.

(Montage: a man scrolling the CFIA's Facebook page on an iPad, computer monitor showing CFIA's Twitter page, hands typing on a laptop, a woman sitting at her computer, two computer monitors with a CFIA web page on the left and CFIA Twitter page on the right, a man on the phone, two men standing in front of a grain truck)

Being modern isn't just about updating laws. It's also about renewing how you do business. The CFIA is committed to delivering its services to consumers and industries in the ways they want and need, in an integrated, timely and secure manner, whether it's online, on the phone or in person.

(Montage: a man inside the cab of a vehicle, an inspector [male] holding a rugged tablet in the woods, a label's UPC code being scanned, a digital reading of 16.44 °F, various shots of CFIA employees working)

Using the latest tools and training, the CFIA aims to consistently interpret and enforce Canada's agricultural and food safety laws, integrating science and risk analysis into every decision. Oversight and enforcement will be more consistent, predictable and transparent.

(Montage: a field of corn, three animated icons: wheat, cow, and plate of food, Canadian flag blowing with snow covered mountains in the background)

No matter what changes the future brings, the CFIA strives to maintain the highest level of plant health, animal health and food safety, for all Canadians.

(Rotating ball with various social media icons on the ball and reflected in the background with the text inspection.gc.ca/StayConnected written below)

(Corporate signature: Canadian Food Inspection Agency / Agence canadienne d'inspection des aliments)

(Canada wordmark)

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency: Safeguarding Plant Health with Science

Darlene Blair, Chief Plant Health Officer for Canada, talks about the importance of Plant Health.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency: Safeguarding Plant Health with Science - Transcript/Captions

(Narrator voice over)

We're called the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, but the CFIA is much more than food.

(Montage: Field of wheat, cow grazing, family eating breakfast at the kitchen table)

The CFIA is dedicated to safeguarding plants, animals and food. This enhances the health and well-being of Canada's people, environment and economy. That's our mission.

(Montage: bin of red peppers, CFIA employees carrying out various inspection activities in forests, fields and labs, people shopping in a grocery store)

(Sign on the side of the road: Canadian Food Inspection Agency 3851 Fallowfield, Canada)

The CFIA is also dedicated to excellence as a science-based regulator... trusted and respected by Canadians and the international community. That's our vision.

(Montage: Woman in a lab examining a petri dish, a man and a woman shaking hands, shipping containers, and cargo being loaded onto an airplane)

(Three animated icons: wheat, cow, and plate of food)

Safeguarding Canada's plants, animals and food demands modern approaches, and a focus on one mission-critical tool: Science.

(Text: The Canadian Food Inspection Agency: Safeguarding Plant Health with Science)

Plants are the first link in the food chain.

(Montage: a field of wheat, the inside of a green house, a hand picking a tomato and a cucumber from a grocery store, a cargo ship in the water)

Plants are also critical to Canada's economy, with the country's crop industry generating more than 22 billion dollars in exports alone.

(Montage: trees in a forest, CFIA inspector [male] walking through the woods, close up of an insect on a tree)

To protect biodiversity and Canada's plant resource base, the CFIA works to prevent the introduction and spread of pests, especially those that could threaten Canada's food security, environment and economy.

(Text: Canada Regulates More than 240 Plant Pests)

(Text: Since 2001 Plant Product Exports Have Increase by 160%)

(Montage: Yellow peppers moving down a conveyor, a shipping yard in a harbor)

The CFIA also works to make sure Canada doesn't export pests to other countries. We work closely with international partners on science-based plant health standards that protect our international reputation and keep trade flowing.

(Speaker: Chief Plant Health Officer for Canada, Darlene Blair in a lab with microscope and samples of insects behind her)

We strive to minimize risks to Canada's plant resource base by developing and enforcing import and export controls, performing inspections, and advancing and applying plant science. Our work covers more than just crops – we're responsible for a great variety of plant resources, including forests.

(Narrator voice over)

(Montage: trees in a forest, truck loaded with tree trunks, a lumber yard)

(Text: Canada is the World's Largest Exporter of Forest Products)

Canada's forest products industry contributes almost 20 billion dollars to the country's GDP and employs more than 200,000 people.

(Speaker: Chief Plant Health Officer for Canada, Darlene Blair in a lab with microscope and samples of insects behind her)

The case of the emerald ash borer shows just how devastating an effect plant pests can have on the industry and the environment. First detected in 2002, this invasive species is expected to cost Canada 2 billion dollars for the treatment, removal and replacement of trees.

(Narrator voice over)

(Montage: trees in a forest, a non-descript map of Canada with an illustration of six Emerald Ash Borer insects shown over Eastern Ontario and Western Quebec, a group of four people walking through a forest, a CFIA inspector [male] in the woods, an Emerald Ash Borer on a leaf, tomatoes on a conveyor, workers bagging bell peppers)

The CFIA has worked to slow the spread of the emerald ash borer, in partnership with other government agencies – and we are also developing control strategies. Robust policies and international work, supported by rigorous inspections have kept many dangerous plant pests out of Canada altogether, protecting plant resources and jobs.

(Montage: a man looking at the CFIA's Stay Connected web page on an iPad, computer monitor showing CFIA's Pinterest web page)

(Text: Over 10,000 Twitter Followers for CFIA Plant Health Issues)

Through social media and on the web, the CFIA gives the public timely, easy-to-understand information on managing pests.

(Montage: two men sitting on a piece of farm equipment plowing a field while a third man watches, various shots of food in production and in the store)

By protecting plant health, the CFIA helps safeguard Canada's environment and economy – and the health of all Canadians. Thanks to the work of the CFIA, we have safe access to a remarkable range of plant-based foods and products from across the country and around the world.

(Three animated icons: wheat, cow, and plate of food)

Plant health is one part of a continuum that also includes animal health and food safety – an integrated approach for the good of Canadians, their environment, and the economy.

(Montage: a field of corn, a salad being tossed, Canadian flag blowing with snow covered mountains in the background)

No matter what changes the future brings, the CFIA strives to maintain the highest level of plant health, animal health and food safety – for all Canadians.

(Rotating ball with various social media icons on the ball and reflected in the background with the text inspection.gc.ca/StayConnected written below)

(Corporate signature: Canadian Food Inspection Agency / Agence canadienne d'inspection des aliments)

(Canada wordmark)

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency: Safeguarding Animal Health with Science

Dr. Harpreet Kochhar, Chief Veterinary Officer of Canada, talks about the importance of Animal Health.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency: Safeguarding Animal Health with Science - Transcript/Captions

(Narrator voice over)

We're called the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, but the CFIA is much more than food.

(Montage: field of wheat, cow grazing, family eating breakfast at the kitchen table)

The CFIA is dedicated to safeguarding plants, animals and food. This enhances the health and well-being of Canada's people, environment and economy. That's our mission.

(Montage: bin of red peppers, CFIA employees carrying out various inspection activities in forests, fields and labs, people shopping in a grocery store)

(Sign on the side of the road: Canadian Food Inspection Agency 3851 Fallowfield, Canada)

The CFIA is also dedicated to excellence as a science-based regulator... trusted and respected by Canadians and the international community. That's our vision.

(Montage: Woman in a lab examining a petri dish, a man and a woman shaking hands, shipping containers, and cargo being loaded onto an airplane)

(Three animated icons: wheat, cow, and plate of food)

Safeguarding Canada's plants, animals and food demands modern approaches, and a focus on one mission-critical tool: Science.

(Text: The Canadian Food Inspection Agency: Safeguarding Animal Health with Science)

Animals are central to Canada's food system.

(Montage: cows and piglets in a farm setting, a man on a boat lifting a trap out of the water, pallets of eggs on a conveyor)

(Text: Canada has Export Agreements with 38 Countries for Live and Terrestrial and Aquatic Animals)

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency protects that system in part by monitoring the health of land and aquatic animals and safeguarding animal feed and animal products.

(Speaker: Chief Veterinary Officer for Canada, Dr. Harpreet Kochhar onsite at a farm feeding a sheep)

The CFIA is well equipped to quickly and effectively manage the many threats to animal health. By doing so, we also protect human health, the food supply and the Canadian economy. Most people probably think of cows and other livestock when they think of what we do, but there is a very wide range of animals under our responsibility, including aquatic species.

(Narrator voice over)

(Montage: the ocean, a CFIA inspector [female] collecting samples of aquatic animals from a body of water, a hand picking up a live lobster, a school of salmon swimming)

CFIA veterinarians and scientists monitor the health of commercially harvested finfish, molluscs and crustaceans, and help keep Canada's salmon farms and wild salmon populations free from disease.

(Text: 80,000 Canadian Jobs in Commercial Fishing and Aquaculture Sectors)

(Montage: overhead shot of a stream, cows grazing with a farm building in the background, images of CFIA inspectors on farms)

(Text: Canada Imports Animals from 32 Countries Totalling $278 Million in Trade)

(Montage: Transport truck driving down a highway, cargo ship being loaded with shipping containers)

Whether dealing with species in water or on land, CFIA veterinarians work with provincial and international counterparts to manage import controls. The controls are designed to prevent disease from entering Canada and to keep international markets open to Canadian producers. This helps maintain trust in Canada's inspection and certification systems.

(Montage: cows eating on a farm, beef on a supermarket shelf)

(Text: Beef Exports from Canada: Worth $1.9 Billion in 2014)

The CFIA also regulates animal feed. Our rigorous monitoring programs have controlled feed-borne bovine spongiform encephalopathy, or BSE. As a result, Canadian beef farmers can sell their products around the world, keeping thousands of Canadians working.

(Speaker: Chief Veterinary Officer for Canada, Dr. Harpreet Kochhar onsite at a farm feeding a sheep)

In an animal health emergency, it's crucial to be able to track down animals. Canadian farmers are required to tag cattle, bison, sheep and pigs with radio frequency identification tags. This helps inform the CFIA's National Emergency Operations Centre about the location of animals anywhere in the country.

(Narrator voice over)

(Montage: cows and chickens on a farm, worker washing hands, fence on a farm, equipment being hosed down)

Animal health is a shared responsibility. Anyone who works with animals – on a farm, at a fair, or elsewhere – has a part to play. Simple, routine practices like washing hands, cleaning out pens and maintaining fences reduce the risk of disease from being introduced and spread.

(Speaker: Chief Veterinary Officer for Canada, Dr. Harpreet Kochhar onsite at a farm feeding a sheep)

The CFIA's mandate includes the welfare of livestock and pets during transportation. The Agency verifies that the transportation of animals is done in accordance with the Health of Animals Regulations.

(Narrator voice over)

(Montage: transport truck parked and being inspected, vehicles driving down the highway, a dog, a cat, and a bird eating a banana)

Responsibility for controls on animals coming into Canada is also shared. For example, border services officers ask travellers to declare pets like dogs, cats and birds – and their feed – to make sure they're healthy and free from contamination.

(Three animated icons: cow, wheat and plate of food)

Animal health is one part of a continuum that also includes plant health and food safety – all part of a holistic or "One Health" approach.

(Montage: field of corn, cows in a field, Canadian flag blowing with snow covered mountains in the background)

No matter what changes the future brings, the CFIA strives to maintain the highest level of plant health, animal health and food safety – for all Canadians.

(Rotating ball with various social media icons on the ball and reflected in the background with the text inspection.gc.ca/StayConnected written below)

(Corporate signature: Canadian Food Inspection Agency / Agence canadienne d'inspection des aliments)

(Canada wordmark)

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency: Safeguarding Food with Science

Dr. Martine Dubuc, Chief Food Safety Officer for Canada and Vice-President, Science, talks about the importance of Food Safety.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency: Safeguarding Food with Science - Transcript/Captions

(Narrator voice over)

We're called the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, but the CFIA is much more than food.

(Montage: field of wheat, cow grazing, family eating breakfast at the kitchen table)

The CFIA is dedicated to safeguarding plants, animals and food. This enhances the health and well-being of Canada's people, environment and economy. That's our mission.

(Montage: bin of red peppers, CFIA employees carrying out various inspection activities in forests, fields and labs, people shopping in a grocery store)

(Sign on the side of the road: Canadian Food Inspection Agency 3851 Fallowfield, Canada)

The CFIA is also dedicated to excellence as a science-based regulator... trusted and respected by Canadians and the international community. That's our vision.

(Montage: Woman in a lab examining a petri dish, a man and a woman shaking hands, shipping containers, and cargo being loaded onto an airplane)

(Three animated icons: wheat, cow, and plate of food)

(Text: The Canadian Food Inspection Agency: Safeguarding Food with Science)

Safeguarding Canada's plants, animals and food demands modern approaches, and a focus on one mission-critical tool: Science.

(Montage: a women working in a lab, various vegetables/fruits)

The CFIA's rigorous, science-based approach has made our food safety system one of the best in the world.

(On screen speaker: Chief Food Safety Officer for Canada, Vice-President, Science, Dr. Martine Dubuc)

(Inset video at the top right of the screen showing farm buildings, meat in a grocery store)

Every day, from farm to fork, we are working to protect Canadians from preventable food hazards and managing risks.

(Narrator voice over)

(Montage: CFIA inspector [female] with an factory employee [female] standing in front of a rack of processed meat, a man pressing a button on a piece of equipment in a factory, a machine depositing eggs into a carton)

The CFIA's work includes inspecting food processing facilities to verify that companies are using the right tools and are complying with regulations.

(Montage: a man and a woman in a lab testing food, test tubes, a man wearing a mask, hair net and hard hat examining equipment with a flash light, a plane ascending in the sky)

CFIA experts also randomly test imports. In addition, to confirm that food imported into Canada meets our rigorous food safety requirements, we visit other countries.

(Text: $105.5 Billion: Value of Production by the Canadian Food and Beverage Processing Industry)

(Montage: factory worker [female] moving a rack of hanging process meat, the nutritional label on a package of processed meat)

In Canada, the CFIA tests the composition of processed food products, sets and enforces labelling laws, and helps develop and implement market practices that support fair competition at all levels of trade.

(Montage: people shopping in supermarkets)

(Montage: a red pepper being picked from a vine, bell peppers added to a pile that are being bagged by employees wearing lab coats, gloves and hair nets, bags of bell peppers on a conveyor)

Even with every precaution, food can never be 100% risk-free. Contamination can occur at any stage.

(Montage: woman in a lab inspecting a bag of red peppers, a man in lab coat working on a laptop, a group of people working in an emergency response room)

The CFIA conducts some 3,000 food safety investigations every year. Working closely with government and industry stakeholders, the Agency follows established protocols to quickly and effectively respond to food safety incidents.

(Text: Average 300 Food Recalls per Year)

Any suspected violation triggers the recall process.

(Montage: a hand typing on a keyboard, a computer monitor showing the CFIA home page with the Food Recall Warnings banner displayed, a man holding an iPad that is showing a food recall tweet, a hand holding a smart phone with a web page about health risks showing)

If a recall is needed, retailers and consumers are quickly alerted – on the web and through social media – in language that's easy to understand.

(On screen speaker: Chief Food Safety Officer for Canada, Vice-President, Science, Dr. Martine Dubuc)

(Inset video at the top right of the screen showing people working in a bakery, a man working in a lab, people shopping in an outdoor market, a flag waving outside an office building)

Everyone has a role to play in food safety: industry, government, and the public. We work closely with provincial and federal departments and agencies like Health Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada, the Canada Border Services Agency and non-profit organizations.

(Narrator voice over)

(Montage: a field on a farm, farm equipment being used to harvest a crop, cucumbers being packaged, women working in a lab, a body of water surrounded by a forest, shipping containers being unloaded from a cargo ship, people shopping in an outdoor market)

From plants to animals, harvesting to processing, no system can be 100% risk-free. But the CFIA knows that through rigorous science and modern approaches, Canada will continue to be well-positioned to compete even more strongly in today's complex global marketplace.

(Montage: a field of corn, three animated icons: wheat, cow, and plate of food, Canadian flag blowing with snow covered mountains in the background).

No matter what changes the future brings, the CFIA strives to maintain the highest level of plant health, animal health and food safety – for all Canadians.

(Rotating ball with various social media icons on the ball and reflected in the background with the text inspection.gc.ca/StayConnected written below)

(Corporate signature: Canadian Food Inspection Agency / Agence canadienne d'inspection des aliments)

(Canada wordmark)

Date modified: