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Minister's Message

The Honourable Jane Philpott, PC, MP
Minister of Health

The Honourable Jane Philpott, PC, MP, Minister of Health

I am pleased to present to Parliament and Canadians this Report on Plans and Priorities, which provides details on the activities that the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) will undertake during the 2016–2017 fiscal year.

This 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities of the CFIA provides information on how the Agency will support the Government on achieving our agenda in the coming year and I am fully confident that the CFIA is prepared to successfully support me and work with our partners inside and outside government to deliver for Canadians. However, given our commitment to more effective reporting, this year's report will be the final submission using the existing reporting framework.

The Prime Minister and the President of the Treasury Board are working to develop new, simplified and more effective reporting processes that will better allow Parliament and Canadians to monitor our Government's progress on delivering real change to Canadians. In the future, the CFIA's reports to Parliament will focus more transparently on how we are using our resources to fulfill our commitments and achieve results for Canadians.

These new reporting mechanisms will allow Canadians to more easily follow our Agency's progress towards delivering on our priorities, which were outlined in the Prime Minister's mandate letter to meEndnote i.

The Government of Canada is committed to safeguarding the health and well-being of Canadians, and helping to ensure food safety is a crucial part of that commitment. Every day, CFIA employees work to protect Canadian consumers from coast to coast. They help protect plant and animal health, prevent food safety hazards, manage food safety investigations and recalls, and safeguard the marketplace from unfair practices.

In its work to support a sustainable plant and animal resource base and regulate food safety, the CFIA makes decisions that are firmly grounded in science. The Agency works closely with its portfolio partners — Health Canada (HC) and the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) — to implement science-based, modern processes and systems. It also collaborates and consults with domestic and international partners, stakeholders, and Canadian consumers.

With regard to food safety, in 2016–2017, the CFIA will continue to phase in its new integrated Agency Inspection Model, which applies globally recognized risk-management concepts that are based on prevention. In partnership with HC, PHAC, the provinces and territories, the CFIA will continue to advance work on the Canadian Food Safety Information Network (CFSIN), a data system that will strengthen our ability to more effectively anticipate, detect and respond to food hazards.

The Agency will also continue to modernize the food labelling model and regulations, so consumers have the information they need to make informed purchasing decisions. In addition, the CFIA will continue to advance regulatory reform in support of regulations associated with the Safe Food for Canadians Act to provide the legal framework for a more consistent approach to strengthening food safety.

The CFIA will advance on several animal health priorities in 2016–2017. The Agency will begin implementing the Canadian Animal Health Surveillance System, a network of networks across Canada that will strengthen the CFIA's ability to respond to animal health emergencies, such as avian influenza outbreaks. The Agency will also work with its federal partners to develop a pan-Canadian framework to address antimicrobial resistance. Through this work, the CFIA will contribute to Canada's response to the World Health Organization's tabling of the Global Action Plan on Antimicrobial Resistance.

To alleviate risks to Canada's plant resources, which are essential to a safe and accessible food supply, the CFIA will track, detect, and control or eradicate plant pests and diseases. For example, Canada will continue to work with the United States on a North American perimeter approach to plant protection to minimize pests and invasive species introduced when moving plants and plant products across the border.

The CFIA is also focused on expanding international market access for Canadian producers. The Agency will continue to engage with the United States through the joint Beyond the Border (BtB) and Regulatory Cooperation Council (RCC) initiatives to better align both countries' regulatory approaches while maintaining high standards for plant protection, animal health, and food safety.

A modern, digital service strategy is a key priority at the CFIA. Looking forward, uniting inspection and other services with the planned Electronic Service Delivery Platform (ESDP) will provide a set of tools to industry, international trading partners and CFIA inspectors, so that regular business transactions can flow smoother and data collection and reporting can be made easier. "Digital first" also applies to CFIA communications services. On the social media front, the CFIA uses multiple platforms like Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Pinterest for timely and interactive communications with Canadians.

The Agency is meeting the challenges of a complex and ever-changing plant protection, animal health and food safety landscape, contributing to better outcomes for Canadians.

The Honourable Jane Philpott, PC, MP
Minister of Health

Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview

Organizational Profile

Appropriate Minister: The Honourable Dr. Jane Philpott, PC, MP

Institutional Head: B.A. (Bruce) Archibald, Ph.D.

Ministerial portfolio: Health

Enabling Instruments:

Year of Incorporation / Commencement: 1997

Other: N/A

Organizational Context

Raison d'être

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is Canada's largest science-based regulatory agency. It has approximately 6,750Footnote 1 employees working across Canada in the National Capital Region (NCR) and in four operational areas (Atlantic, Quebec, Ontario and Western).

The CFIA is dedicated to safeguarding food, animal, and plant health, which enhances the health and well-being of Canada's people, environment, and economy.

The CFIA develops and delivers inspection and other services in order to:

  • Prevent and manage food safety risks;
  • Protect plant resources from pests, diseases and invasive species;
  • Prevent and manage animal and zoonotic diseases;
  • Contribute to consumer protection; and
  • Contribute to market access for Canada's food, plants, and animals.

The CFIA bases its activities on science, effective risk management, commitment to service and efficiency, and collaboration with domestic and international organizations that share its objectives.

Responsibilities

The CFIA is responsible for administrating and enforcing 13 federal statutes and 38 sets of regulations, for supporting a sustainable plant and animal resource base and regulating the safety and quality of food sold in Canada. In November 2012, the Safe Food for Canadians Act received Royal Assent. This new legislation, when fully in force, will bring into effect new regulations and provide the necessary legal framework for a more consistent approach to strengthening food inspection in Canada. The Safe Food for Canadians Act consolidates and will replace the Fish Inspection Act, the Canada Agricultural Products Act, the Meat Inspection Act, and the food provisions of the Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act.

The CFIA's Key Federal Partners

  • Health Canada
  • Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
  • Public Health Agency of Canada
  • Canada Border Services Agency
  • Canadian Grain Commission
  • Public Safety Canada
  • Fisheries and Oceans Canada
  • Natural Resources Canada, including Canadian Forest Service
  • Global Affairs Canada
  • Environment and Climate Change Canada, including Canadian Wildlife Service

The Agricultural Growth Act received Royal Assent on February 25, 2015 and has come into force – except one subsection, 53(1) of the Act. The Agricultural Growth Act modernizes and strengthens federal agriculture legislation, supports innovation in the Canadian agriculture industry and enhances global market opportunities for Canadians. The Agricultural Growth Act updates the following suite of Acts that the CFIA uses to regulate Canada's agriculture sector: Plant Breeders' Rights Act, Feeds Act, Fertilizers Act, Seeds Act, Health of Animals Act, Plant Protection Act, and the Agriculture and Agri-Food Administrative Monetary Penalties Act.

The CFIA shares many of its core responsibilities with other federal departments and agencies, with provincial, territorial and municipal authorities, with private industry, and with other stakeholders. The CFIA works with its partners to implement food safety measures; manage plant, animal, and food risks, incidents and emergencies; and promotes the development of food safety and disease control systems to maintain the safety of Canada's high-quality agriculture, agri-food, aquaculture and fishery products . The CFIA's activities include verifying the compliance of imported products; registering and inspecting establishments; testing plants, animals, and their related products, and food; and approving the use of many agricultural inputs.

Within a three-year period, with the passage of the Safe Food for Canadians Act in 2012, which is not currently in force, and the Agricultural Growth Act in 2015, every statute administered and enforced by the CFIA has been revised with new authorities. Having a modern legislative base is critical for the CFIA to address new challenges and issues, and respond to new pressures, trends and science.

New authorities include:

  • Modern inspector authorities so that inspectors have the right tools to do their job;
  • Revised and strengthened offence provisions, with more up-to-date fines and penalties;
  • Explicit authorization for export certification;
  • Regulatory authority to require licensing and/or registration;
  • Explicit authority to incorporate documents by referenceFootnote 2;
  • Regulatory authority to require preventive control plans and quality management plans for manufacturers;
  • Document and record-keeping requirements.

Additionally, the CFIA actively participates in international fora for the development of international science-based rules, standards, guidelines and policies. It also engages in the management of sanitary and phytosanitary committees established under international agreements and actively promotes the Canadian science-based regulatory system among foreign trading partners. The CFIA negotiates to resolve scientific and technical issues, contributing to market access for Canadian goods. It also provides scientific advice, develops new technologies, provides testing services, and conducts regulatory researchFootnote 2.

At the CFIA, decisions are based on high- quality, timely, relevant science. Science informs policy development and program design and delivery through foresight, advice, risk assessment, the influence of international standards, research and development, and testing.

Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture (PAA)

To effectively fulfill its responsibilities in safeguarding Canada's food supply and sustaining its animal and plant resource base, the CFIA aims to achieve its strategic outcomeFootnote 3 (A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base). The CFIA's Program Alignment Architecture (PAA) illustrates the Agency's plans to allocate and manage its resources to achieve the corresponding expected results. The CFIA's PAA framework, through which resources are allocated for effective delivery of its mandate and performance reporting to Parliament, consists of:

  • 1. Strategic Outcome: A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.
    • 1.1. Program: Food Safety Program
      • 1.1.1. Sub Program: Meat and Poultry
      • 1.1.2. Sub Program: Egg
      • 1.1.3. Sub Program: Dairy
      • 1.1.4. Sub Program: Fish and Seafood
      • 1.1.5. Sub Program: Fresh Fruits and Vegetables
      • 1.1.6. Sub Program: Processed Products
      • 1.1.7. Sub Program: Imported and Manufactured Food Products
    • 1.2. Program: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
      • 1.2.1. Sub Program: Terrestrial Animal Health
      • 1.2.2. Sub Program: Aquatic Animal Health
      • 1.2.3. Sub Program: Feed
    • 1.3. Program: Plant Resources Program
      • 1.3.1. Sub Program: Plant Protection
      • 1.3.2. Sub Program: Seed
      • 1.3.3. Sub Program: Fertilizer
      • 1.3.4. Sub Program: Intellectual Property Rights
    • 1.4. Program: International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

Internal Services

Organizational Priorities

The CFIA will continue to strive to remain a world-class regulator in the plant, animal health, and food sectors. For 2016-17, CFIA will continue to transform itself by:

  • continuing to implement legislative and regulatory modernization and enhanced processes and systems within the Agency;
  • partnering domestically and internationally; and
  • collaborating with stakeholders.

Outlined below are the CFIA's main priorities for 2016-17, based on the Agency's Long-Term Strategic Plan (LTSP). By defining the Agency's long-term vision and carefully considering its key strategic risks, the LTSP assists the CFIA in mitigating its risk, strengthening its foundation and effectively delivering its core program activities.

Priority: Increased focus on prevention

Description: An increased focus on prevention will provide an opportunity to minimize risks to human, animal and ecosystem health. As well, integrating proactive and preventive risk management approaches into all CFIA programs and bolstering these approaches with a clear inclusive focus on partnerships and information sharing will help the CFIA to anticipate, prevent, prepare for, and manage issues, including emergencies.

Priority Type:Footnote 4 Ongoing

Key Supporting Initiatives:
Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Link to Agency's Program Alignment Architecture

Design inspection systems to verify the effectiveness of industry's prevention systems

2013

Ongoing

All the planned initiatives are linked to the following programs:

  • Food Safety Program
  • Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
  • Plant Resources Program
  • International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

Design inspection systems to verify the effectiveness of industry's prevention systems

  • Implement integrated Agency Inspection Model in phases across programs

2013

2018/19

All the planned initiatives are linked to the following programs:

  • Food Safety Program
  • Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
  • Plant Resources Program
  • International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

Continue to implement legislative and regulatory modernization within the Agency

2013

2018 for current modernization process and ongoing thereafter

All the planned initiatives are linked to the following programs:

  • Food Safety Program
  • Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
  • Plant Resources Program
  • International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

Integrate proactive and preventive risk management approaches into all CFIA programs

2013

Ongoing

All the planned initiatives are linked to the following programs:

  • Food Safety Program
  • Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
  • Plant Resources Program
  • International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

Integrate proactive and preventive risk management approaches into all CFIA programs

  • Integrated Risk Management Framework

2015

2017/18

All the planned initiatives are linked to the following programs:

  • Food Safety Program
  • Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
  • Plant Resources Program
  • International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

Anticipate, prevent, and prepare for risks through partnerships, networks and information sharing with stakeholders

2013

Ongoing

All the planned initiatives are linked to the following programs:

  • Food Safety Program
  • Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
  • Plant Resources Program
  • International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

Anticipate, prevent, and prepare for risks through partnerships, networks and information sharing with stakeholders

  • Lead the creation of a food safety surveillance network among federal and provincial authorities, supported by laboratories and reporting infrastructure, to improve our detection and response to foodborne hazards

2013

Fall 2019

All the planned initiatives are linked to the following programs:

  • Food Safety Program
  • Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
  • Plant Resources Program
  • International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

Ensure stakeholders have a clear and common understanding of their primary role in managing risk.

2013

Ongoing

All the planned initiatives are linked to the following programs:

  • Food Safety Program
  • Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
  • Plant Resources Program
  • International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

Ensure stakeholders have a clear and common understanding of their primary role in managing risk.

  • Identify and communicate partner roles, responsibilities and expectations as part of CFIA's modernization initiatives

2013

2018 for current modernization process and ongoing thereafter

All the planned initiatives are linked to the following programs:

  • Food Safety Program
  • Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
  • Plant Resources Program
  • International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

Priority: Focus on service excellence

Description: The CFIA's role as an effective regulator will be enhanced by a focus on service excellence. Strengthening the CFIA's citizen-centred service delivery culture will result in enhanced program delivery and increased confidence in the Agency as a trusted and credible regulator by domestic and international stakeholders.

Priority Type:Footnote 4 Ongoing

Key Supporting Initiatives:
Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Link to Agency's Program Alignment Architecture

Embed service culture within the Agency

2013

Ongoing

All the planned initiatives are linked to the following programs:

  • Food Safety Program
  • Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
  • Plant Resources Program
  • International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

Embed service culture within the Agency

  • Develop and implement a revised Agency service model to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of CFIA services as well as improve alignment of service delivery standards and practices with Treasury Board policies and direction.

2014

2017

All the planned initiatives are linked to the following programs:

  • Food Safety Program
  • Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
  • Plant Resources Program
  • International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

Ensure CFIA services support efficient and effective regulation of those segments of the marketplace that it regulates.

2013

Ongoing

All the planned initiatives are linked to the following programs:

  • Food Safety Program
  • Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
  • Plant Resources Program
  • International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

Ensure CFIA services support efficient and effective regulation of those segments of the marketplace that it regulates.

  • Implement an electronic service delivery platform to enable improved electronic access to CFIA information and services (e.g. e-certification)

2013

Spring 2018

All the planned initiatives are linked to the following programs:

  • Food Safety Program
  • Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
  • Plant Resources Program
  • International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

Ensure the CFIA is considered a trusted, transparent and credible regulator with adaptable, predictable and consistent program delivery

2013

Ongoing

All the planned initiatives are linked to the following programs:

  • Food Safety Program
  • Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
  • Plant Resources Program
  • International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

Ensure the CFIA is considered a trusted, transparent and credible regulator with adaptable, predictable and consistent program delivery

  • Implement the improved inspection model

2013

2018

All the planned initiatives are linked to the following programs:

  • Food Safety Program
  • Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
  • Plant Resources Program
  • International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

Priority: Focus on internal performance excellence

Description: Optimizing performance will enable the CFIA to evaluate the effectiveness of the Agency's policies and programs in order to allocate resources to areas of highest risk. It will also enable the Agency to adapt and evolve to meet new demands and expectations with a focus on internal performance excellence

Priority Type:Footnote 4 Ongoing

Key Supporting Initiatives:
Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Link to Agency's Program Alignment Architecture

Embed a performance management mindset in the Agency

2013

Ongoing

All the planned initiatives are linked to the following programs:

  • Food Safety Program
  • Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
  • Plant Resources Program
  • International Collaboration and Technical Agreements
  • Internal Service

Develop strong internal management systems and governance that support risk-based planning and resource allocation

2013

Ongoing

All the planned initiatives are linked to the following programs:

  • Food Safety Program
  • Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
  • Plant Resources Program
  • International Collaboration and Technical Agreements
  • Internal Service

Priority: Focus on people supported by training and tools

Description: Focusing on diverse talent, supported by training and modern tools, will result in a stable and skilled CFIA workforce with adaptable and motivated employees.

Priority Type:Footnote 4 Ongoing

Key Supporting Initiatives:
Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Link to Agency's Program Alignment Architecture

Continue to retain and attract competent, qualified, and motivated personnel

2013

Ongoing

All the planned initiatives are linked to the following programs:

  • Food Safety Program
  • Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
  • Plant Resources Program
  • International Collaboration and Technical Agreements
  • Internal Service

Ensure individuals have the tools, training and information they need to support the Agency and progress in their careers

2013

Ongoing

All the planned initiatives are linked to the following programs:

  • Food Safety Program
  • Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
  • Plant Resources Program
  • International Collaboration and Technical Agreements
  • Internal Service

Ensure a culture of engagement

2013

Ongoing

All the planned initiatives are linked to the following programs:

  • Food Safety Program
  • Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
  • Plant Resources Program
  • International Collaboration and Technical Agreements
  • Internal Service

Risk Analysis

The CFIA is responsible for identifying and managing risks to the plant and animal resource base, and the food supply on which safe food and a prosperous economy depends. Across the Agency, integrated risk management is an integral part of policy, priority setting, planning, delivery, review and reporting activities.

The vast majority of the risks that fall within the Agency's mandate are managed in concert with numerous partners and stakeholders, both domestic and international. Factors influencing key strategic risks faced by the Agency include (but are not limited to):

  • the ongoing emergence of new pathogens due to increases in international travel and trade, microbial adaptation, changes in production methods and distribution as well as human demographics and behavior;
  • the convergence of human, animal and ecosystem health issues;
  • the emergence of global supply chains, which have fundamentally changed the way agricultural products are produced, processed, packaged, distributed and sold;
  • an increase in both the volume and variety of goods coming into Canada;
  • increased export opportunities for Canadian producers, coupled with changing international standards and more stringent requirements;
  • rapid advances in processing and manufacturing technologies, resulting in significant increases in production speed, volume and diversity and the subsequent need for legislative and regulatory frameworks to keep pace;
  • an increasingly knowledgeable, demanding and risk-averse consumer and stakeholder base; and
  • a growing international consensus around the need for common technologies and scientific approaches to support industry oversight and the global agri-food trade.

Current risk management practices at the CFIA include the development of a Corporate Risk Profile (CRP). The Agency's CRP identifies the key strategic risks to which the Agency is exposed as a result of its internal and external operating environments, and provides strategies aimed at reducing risk exposure to tolerable levels over the next several years. The CRP was last fully renewed in 2012 with a refresh of the annex in 2014.

The Agency's transformation agenda has been driven by a vision for an enhanced outcome and risk-based, preventive system. To enhance the Agency's ability to more quickly align its efforts to have the greatest impact on reducing risk, the CFIA is developing a model that will systematically measure and compare the diverse risks that the Agency manages on behalf of Canadians.

The model will provide the CFIA with information regarding the relative importance of risks and cost-effectiveness of efforts to mitigate them. It will support Government commitment to evidence-based decision making and transparency. Information gained will inform decisions about how best to plan inspections, surveillance and other activities. The ultimate outcome will be the CFIA's ability to deliver the best value in terms of risk reduction for public dollars spent.

Table 1 highlights the CFIA's key strategic risks, ranked in terms of likelihood and impact and provides associated planned response strategies. All risks link to the organization's Program Alignment Architecture (PAA).

Table 1: Key Risks
Risk Risk Response Strategy Link to Program Alignment Architecture

Managing Change

The ability to effectively manage change on an ongoing basis.

The global evolution of economic, social and environmental factors influences the regulatory and business environment within which the Agency operates.

Additionally, fiscal restraint is growing in importance, as is the subsequent need for greater innovation to achieve efficiency while maintaining or increasing effectiveness in the way the Agency does its business and delivers its mandate.

  • Continue to implement Agency Transformation.
  • Continue to implement CFIA's Project Management Development Program.
  • Develop and implement an Investment Planning Performance Measurement Framework.
  • Continue to strengthen risk management, planning, performance monitoring and reporting.
  • Advance the Benefit Realization Management to support CFIA's investment and performance management approaches.
  • Continue work on User Fees and Service Standards Modernization by implementing the proposed action plan and path forward presented to Agency Modernization Executive Table in March 2015 on the One-Agency approach.
  • Reinforce Values and Ethics.
  • Continue to advance CFIA's Business Architecture.

Linked to the CFIA's Strategic Outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

Management Information and IM/IT Infrastructure

The ability to make risk-based decisions due to the lack of timely, accurate and useful data and information.

The Agency's diverse information requirements and national presence has resulted in an IM/IT infrastructure containing a complex mix of new and old equipment that supports multiple IM/IT systems and databases. Differences in how information is collected, analyzed, and used across multiple systems and hardware may impede information sharing and timely operational and regulatory decision making.

  • IM/IT Platform Modernization and Consolidation: includes implementing the Email Transformation Initiative.
  • Service Delivery Modernization: includes the Electronic Service Delivery Platform, the Licensing Portal and the Web Consolidation initiatives.
  • Continue to implement the Web Renewal Initiatives.
  • Continue to develop Digital Communications.
  • Continue to implement CFIA's e-Agency Strategy.
  • Continue to produce Business Information Management Centre (BIMC) dashboards.

Linked to the CFIA's Strategic Outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

Transparency and Leveraging Relationships

Opportunity for the Agency to increase its transparency and accountability to stakeholders.

Information sharing enables regulated parties to take steps to ensure compliance and helps to increase public awareness and confidence in the Canadian marketplace. Diverse methods exist to engage and collaborate with industry, other governmental stakeholders and the public to enhance the development of outputs that are mutually beneficial and agreed-upon.

  • Continue to implement the Web Renewal Initiative.
  • Continue to develop Digital Communications.
  • Continue to enhance communication and engagement with stakeholders.
  • Increase communication and engagement with International Partners.
  • Continue to implement User Fees and Service Standards Modernization.

Linked to the CFIA's Strategic Outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

Emergency Management

The ability to respond to multiple simultaneous or large-scale emergencies.

The CFIA has a well- planned emergency preparedness and response capacity. However, threat environments continue to evolve, requiring regular updating of plans and responses to reflect changes and find efficiencies to ensure that the Agency maintains a minimum of essential business functions during emergencies.

  • Continue the development of the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Strategic Emergency Management Framework (SEMF).
  • Continue to maintain and monitor current Emergency Management preparedness / response mitigation strategies.

Linked to the CFIA's Strategic Outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

Scientific Capability

The ability to have the scientific capability to adapt and respond in a timely manner.

Advancements in science and technology have increased the complexity of the commodities the Agency regulates. Additionally, there is growing international consensus around the need for common scientific equipment and approaches to support industry oversight and the global agri-food trade. The Agency is expected to maintain an employee base and modern laboratory facilities that reflects these advancements in regulated products and international requirements.

  • Continue to strengthen Science Capacity.
  • Continue to build the Canadian Food Safety Information Network (CFSIN).
  • Continue to implement Canadian Animal Health Surveillance Network (CAHSN).
  • Increase engagement with international partners.
  • Continue to implement the Agency's human resources modernization initiatives.

Linked to the CFIA's Strategic Outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

Legislative, Regulatory and Program Framework

The ability of the current legislative, regulatory and program framework to support the effective delivery of the Agency's mandate.

Rapid advances in processing and manufacturing technologies have resulted in significant increases in production speed, volume and diversity, requiring the subsequent need for updated legislative and regulatory frameworks. Statutes and authorities impact the design and delivery of programs that regulate new commodities and support economic competitiveness within the industry.

  • Advance CFIA's Regulatory Plan for 2016
  • Continue to develop CFIA's Integrated Risk Management Framework, including the Program Risk Management Framework.
  • Continue to advance CFIA's Business Architecture.
  • Develop a Plant and Animal Health Modernization Strategy.
  • Continue the work on CFIA's Systems Performance.

Linked to the CFIA's Strategic Outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

Inspection Effectiveness

The ability to have appropriate inspection effectiveness to expeditiously prevent, detect and respond to threats to food safety, animals and plants.

Until recently, the Agency delivered 14 independently evolved inspection programs, each having diverse and complex requirements for training, information collection and industry compliance that differ depending on the commodity being regulated.

Currently, the Agency's resource efficiency is impacted due to the maintenance of multiple training programs and IM/IT systems used to address distinct variations in inspection processes, tools, and information collection.

  • Continue to implement the Agency Transformation Agenda.
  • Implement the Integrated Agency Inspection Model (iAIM), using a phased-in approach through successive waves, nationally and across all three business lines. Implementation of iAIM will begin with a focus on standard inspection procedures and compliance verification of regulated parties' preventive control plans. 
  • Continue to deliver the Pre-Requisite Employment Program (PREP).
  • Continue to deliver the Supervisors' School program to enhance food safety culture through effective supervision.
  • Continue to advance CFIA's Business Architecture.
  • Continue to implement the Agency's human resources modernization initiatives.

Linked to the CFIA's Strategic Outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

Planned Expenditures

The following tables present the CFIA's total 2016-17 Planned Spending levels and full-time equivalents for the next three fiscal years (2016-17 to 2018-19), excluding funding extensions that the Agency plans to pursue. The tables also reflect the 2016-17 Main Estimates amount for which parliamentary approval will be sought.

Budgetary Financial Resources – (dollars)
2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
739,739,165 747,139,165 668,623,826 665,804,636
Human Resources (Full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
5,987 5,952 5,949

The 2016-17 Planned Spending is $7.4 million higher than the Main Estimates for the same period. This difference is due to planned transfers from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) to the CFIA to support the joint objectives of the Portfolio Market Access activities and to provide AAFC with technical expertise in the area of on-farm and post-farm food safety system; national biosecurity standards; and traceability under Growing Forward 2.

From 2016-17 to 2018-19, the $81.3 million and 38 FTE decreases in plans are primarily related to the sunsetting of funding for the Electronic Service Delivery Platform and Federal Infrastructure Initiatives.

Budgetary Planning Summary for Strategic Outcome and Programs (dollars)

Strategic Outcome: A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base
Strategic Outcome, Programs and Internal Services 2013-14
Expenditures
2014-15
Expenditures
2015-16
Forecast Spending
2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending

Food Safety Program

364,310,525

421,520,442

396,672,510

364,582,936

365,461,365

318,276,712

315,457,522

Animal and Zoonotics Program

187,939,265

162,039,970

119,149,572

137,163,046

138,055,855

123,478,947

123,478,947

Plant Resources Program

86,537,966

90,262,195

81,732,879

93,368,850

93,894,697

78,723,209

78,723,209

International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

35,004,557

40,718,768

35,080,219

31,045,476

35,727,492

35,727,492

35,727,492

Strategic Outcome Sub Total

673,792,313

714,541,375

632,635,180

626,160,307

633,139,409

556,206,360

553,387,170

Internal Services

131,959,340

133,951,514

118,604,347

113,578,857

113,999,756

112,417,466

112,417,466

Total

805,751,653

848,492,889

751,239,526

739,739,165

747,139,165

668,623,826

665,804,636

The 2013-14 and 2014-15 information represents final expenditures. The 2015-16 Forecast Spending reflects the Agency's spending authorities granted by Parliament consistent with the Main Estimates, Supplementary Estimates (A) for the 2015-16 fiscal year, and authorities received from Treasury Board Central Votes. The 2015-16 authorities will be updated as a result of final Supplementary Estimates and other adjustments, such as allocations from TB central votes and year-end updates to Statutory Authorities. 2015 16 year-end authorities and actual expenditures will be reported in the 2015-16 Departmental Performance Report.

2016-17 through 2018-19 are planned spending authorities and exclude resources that have not yet been approved such as: the anticipated renewal of sunsetting resources, annual year-end authority adjustments for statutory items, and annual allocations from TB central votes.

Major Trends:

  • Overall Agency resources decrease from 2013-14 to 2018-19 primarily due to: various savings initiatives that focus on back office efficiencies and administrative changes, and the sunsetting of resources under the Food Safety Program. The Agency will assess the level of resources required for these sunsetting funds and seek renewal as required to maintain and continuously improve Canada's: strong food safety system; and, safe and accessible food supply.
  • The Agency's 2014-15 Expenditures included substantial one-time disbursements related to government-wide workforce initiatives and retroactive salary settlement payments.
  • The significant decrease in the Animal Health and Zoonotics Program relates to statutory compensation payments made under the Health of Animals Act in 2013-14 and 2014-15 which are not forecasted in future years.
  • The significant 2016-17 to 2018-19 decrease in the Food Safety Program, Animal Health and Zoonotics Program and the Plant Resources Program primarily relates to the sunsetting of the Electronic Service Delivery Platform and Federal Infrastructure initiatives.

Alignment of Spending With the Whole-of-Government Framework

Alignment of 2016-17 Planned Spending With the Whole-of-Government FrameworkEndnote xvii (dollars)

Strategic Outcome Program Spending Area Government of Canada Outcome 2016-17 Planned Spending
A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base Food Safety Program Social Affairs Healthy Canadians

365,461,365

A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base Animal Health and Zoonotics Program Social Affairs Healthy Canadians

138,055,855

A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base Plant Resources Program Economic Affairs A clean and healthy environment

93,894,697

A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base International Collaboration and Technical Agreements International Affairs A prosperous Canada through global commerce

35,727,492

Total Planned Spending by Spending Area (dollars)
Spending Area Total Planned Spending
Economic Affairs

93,894,697

Social Affairs

503,517,220

International Affairs

35,727,492

Government Affairs

-

Departmental Spending Trend

The CFIA saw a spending increase in 2014-15 due to substantial one-time disbursements related to government-wide workforce initiatives and retroactive salary settlement payments.

The CFIA's planned spending trend increases from 2015-16 to 2016-17, mainly due to increased resources for the second year of the Federal Infrastructure Initiative, and incremental resources for the Electronic Service Delivery Platform Initiative. Anticipated resources for 2017-18 and 2018-19 are fairly stable. With regards to sunsetting funds, the Agency will assess the level of resources required for these initiatives and seek renewal as required to maintain and continuously improve Canada's strong food safety system; and, safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

Departmental Spending Trend Graph. Description follows.
Description for Departmental Spending Trend Graph
Description of Departmental Spending Trend graph
Actual Spending
2013–14
Actual Spending
2014–15
Forecast Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
2018–19
Sunset Programs – Anticipated 0 0 0 42,923,401 42,923,401 42,923,401
Statutory 194,030,459 181,267,323 135,486,195 134,622,227 134,622,227 134,622,227
Voted 611,721,194 667,225,566 615,753,331 612,516,938 534,001,599 531,182,409
Total 805,751,653 848,492,889 751,239,526 790,062,566 711,547,227 708,728,037

Estimates by Vote

For information on the CFIA's organizational appropriations, consult the 2016–17 Main Estimates.Endnote xviii

Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome

This section details the CFIA's planned activities for its strategic outcome as informed by a number of factors, including Federal Government and Agency priorities, the Agency's Corporate Risk Profile, and the application of lessons learned. Lessons learned may be derived from a variety of sources, including: internal and external audits; internal program evaluations; stakeholder feedback and consultation; information from performance measurement (including quality management); and structured post-incident analysis following events such as significant plant pest occurrence or animal disease outbreak or a major food safety recall. This section features key areas on which the CFIA will focus its efforts over the next three years.

Strategic Outcome: A Safe and Accessible Food Supply and Plant and Animal Resource Base

Mitigating risks to food safety is a key CFIA priority. Safeguarding the health and well-being of Canada's people, environment, and economy is the driving force behind the design and development of the CFIA's programs. The CFIA, in collaboration and partnership with industry, consumers, universities, and federal, provincial and municipal organizations, will continue to work towards protecting Canadians from preventable health risks related to food and zoonotic diseases.

The CFIA supports Canadian agriculture and the ability of agri-food businesses to enter domestic and global markets and compete successfully therein. To support this objective, the CFIA will continue to modernize and enforce regulatory and program frameworks for imports and exports that meet both Canadian and international requirements. The CFIA will continue to regularly engage in outreach and consultation activities with key stakeholders and partners including industry, consumers, and international trade and standards organizations. This engagement enables the CFIA to maintain open and transparent communication with its stakeholder and consultative groups.

The CFIA strives for excellence and continuous improvement to achieve greater safety outcome and integrity from regulatory systems. The CFIA continues to move towards a more preventive and systems-based approach under the integrated Agency Inspection Model to enable both the CFIA and regulated parties to more readily adapt to emerging risks and global and scientific trends. The CFIA's integrated Agency Inspection Model applies globally recognized risk management concepts based on prevention. The integrated Agency Inspection Model replaces the improved food inspection model to fully align the strategic outcomes for all CFIA inspection work and reflect the full Agency mandate. The model represents the CFIA's vision and its approach to regulatory inspection. The CFIA has begun phasing the model into operation and will continue through 2020. More information about implementation will be provided to stakeholders as it progresses.

The CFIA will continue to advance regulatory reform in support of the Safe Food for Canadians Act to further strengthen and modernize Canada's food safety system. The Agricultural Growth Act, which was passed by the House of Commons on November 24, 2014, and the Senate on February 24, 2015, received Royal Assent on February 25, 2015. The Agricultural Growth Act is designed to modernize and strengthen federal agriculture legislation, support innovation in the Canadian agriculture industry and enhance global market opportunities. The ActEndnote xix introduces changes to the suite of statutes that the CFIA uses to regulate our agricultural sector. All of the CFIA sections of the Agricultural Growth Act are now in force – except one. Subsection 53(1) of the Act, which amends the definitions of "livestock" and "sell" in the Feeds Act, will require regulations to operate. The CFIA will continue to work on regulatory renewal for fertilizer and feed and amendments of animal health and plant protection regulatory frameworks.

The CFIA is also focused on several horizontal initiatives aimed at contributing to consumer protection. The CFIA plans to enhance stakeholder engagement, to continue to advance its food labelling modernization and transparency initiatives, build and enhance data systems and capacity for decision-making, and deliver on its many day to day operational activities. These day to day activities include providing the public with food recall and allergy alert notices and implementing import border blitzes designed to identify and intercept imported food items that may pose a health threat to Canadians.

In line with the improvements made to the Food Safety Program, the CFIA will implement inspection modernization for the Plant Resources and Animal Health & Zoonotics programs. This will assist the Agency to clearly define responsibilities for regulated parties and the CFIA, provide consistent oversight of sectors subject to regulations enforced by the CFIA, expand the use of science and inspection data to help focus resources on areas with the greatest risk, and adapt inspection to focus on verifying the effectiveness of regulated parties' controls.

Genomics science at the CFIA aims to develop and apply new knowledge and expertise, and faster and more accurate and cost-effective diagnostic technologies, tools and methods for detection, isolation, identification and characterization of new and emerging pathogens, pests and invasive species relevant for the Agency's three Business Lines (Plant, Animal and Food). In 2016-17, The CFIA will participate in Phase VI (2016-2019) of Genomics Research and Development Initiative's (GRDI) new Shared Priority projects involving scientific research collaboration for the application of genomics. These new shared priority projects are expected to address the Government of Canada's strategic priorities of anti-microbial resistance and also protecting Canada's biodiversity and ecosystems.

As part of Agency Transformation, the CFIA will update its Program Alignment Architecture (PAA) and its supporting Performance Measurement Framework (PMF) to reflect a single food program.

The performance tables listed in the proceeding pages describe the performance indicators used to measure the extent to which the CFIA is achieving its single strategic outcome. (See Tables 2-1, 2-2, 2-3 and 2-4). The methodology that will be used in assessing the actual performance of each indicator is available on our websiteEndnote xx.

To be successful in delivering on its Strategic Outcome, the CFIA has a robust risk management discipline and fosters its use throughout the Agency. As such, the CFIA will continue to monitor and assess its operating environment in order to be aware of the risks and opportunities potentially impacting the achievement of its desired outcome. A cornerstone of its risk management process is the development of an Agency-wide Corporate Risk Profile (CRP). The CFIA key corporate risks, as outlined in its CRP, are summarized in Table 1.

As part of its modernization agenda, the CFIA is developing a risk-based decision support model to facilitate comparison of risks across the Agency's business lines and provide a stronger analytical basis to inform long-term organizational planning and decision-making. The model is anchored on the CFIA's new Integrated Risk Management Framework (Framework), which aims to strengthen the integration of risk management practices and processes, and to provide more specificity around consistency in application of risk management, accountability and linkages to planning and decision-making.

In order to mitigate these risks and achieve its strategic outcome, the Agency will, through the actions of its program activities (Food Safety, Animal Health and Zoonotics, Plant Resources, International Collaboration and Technical Agreements), concentrate its 2016-17 efforts on modernizing regulations and processes and systems, building scientific capacity and partnership, partnering domestically and internationally, and engaging and collaborating with stakeholders.

This will help the Agency support the following four priorities:

  • An increased focus on prevention which will provide an opportunity to minimize risks to human, animal and plant health;
  • The CFIA's role as an effective regulator will be enhanced by a focus on service excellence;
  • Adapt and evolve to meet new demands and expectations with a focus on internal performance excellence; and
  • Focusing on people who are supported by training and tools

Program 1.1: Food Safety Program

Description

The Food Safety Program aims to mitigate risks to public health associated with diseases and other health hazards in the food supply system and to manage food safety emergencies and incidents. The program achieves its objectives by promoting food safety awareness through public engagement and verification of compliance by industry with standards and science-based regulations. The program delivers initiatives to verify that consumers receive food safety and nutrition information and to mitigate unfair market practices targeting consumers and industry. Collaboration with other governments and stakeholders further enhances the Agency's ability to track, detect and mitigate risks associated with food and the food supply system, including food-borne illness. This program supports public health and instils confidence in Canada's food system.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
364,582,936 365,461,365 318,276,712 315,457,522
Human Resources (Full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
3,116 3,086 3,083

The Planned Spending for the Food Safety Program decreases by $50.0 million and 33 FTEs from 2016-17 to 2018-19. This decrease is primarily related to the sunsetting of funding for the Electronic Service Delivery Platform, Federal Infrastructure Initiative, and a small decrease in Food Safety Oversight funding.

Table 2-1a: Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Risks to the Canadian public associated with the food supply system are mitigated Number of commodity areas where inspected federally-registered establishments meet established compliance targets 6 out of 6 31 March 2017
Risks to the Canadian public associated with the food supply system are mitigated Percentage of Public Warnings for Class I Table Note 5 food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decision 100% 31 March 2017
Risks to the Canadian public associated with the food supply system are mitigated Percentage of Public Warnings for Class II Table Note 6 food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decision 95% 31 March 2017
Domestic and imported food products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Number of commodity areas where tested domestic food products meet established compliance targets 6 out of 6 31 March 2017
Domestic and imported food products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Number of commodity areas where tested imported food products meet established compliance targets 6 out of 6 31 March 2017

Table Notes

Table Note 5

Class I — represents a situation in which there is a reasonable probability that the consumption or exposure to a food will lead to adverse health consequences which are serious or life-threatening, or that the probability of a foodborne outbreak situation is considered high.

Return to table note 5  referrer

Table Note 6

Class II represents a situation in which there is a reasonable probability that the consumption or exposure to a food will lead to temporary or non-life threatening health consequences or that the probability of serious adverse consequences is considered remote.

Return to table note 6  referrer

Planning Highlights

The Food Safety Program has established four main strategic priorities for 2016-17: publication of the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR), modernization of the Food Labelling model and regulations, modernization of the Slaughter Inspection Program and establishment of baselines for pathogen reduction.

Regulatory Modernization to Enhance Safety and Efficiency

The CFIA has made significant progress towards modernizing its legislation, and inspection model. In 2016-17, the CFIA will continue to advance regulatory reform in support of the Safe Food for Canadians Act. The desired end state is a preventive system that enables the Agency to consistently manage risk and resources horizontally across commodities. The proposed Safe Food for Canadians Regulations are targeted to be published in Canada Gazette Part I within the upcoming fiscal year.

To ensure an effective implementation of the proposed Safe Food for Canadians Regulations, the CFIA will develop and implement a comprehensive compliance promotion strategy that will raise awareness of and support industry's understanding of the new requirements. This will include interactive, user-oriented online tools and resources, proactive outreach and communications and a variety of guidance documents. In particular, a handbook will be developed to explain who needs a licence or a Preventive Control Plan (PCP) and outline draft PCP templates for small businesses and related frequently asked questions (FAQ).

The CFIA will develop Interpretive Guidance (IG) to explain the regulatory requirements and why they are important, as well as Model Systems (MS) that present historically accepted practices to help industry comply with the regulations. The Interpretive Guidance and Model Systems should be released at the same time as the publication of the SFCR in Canada Gazette Part II.

In partnership with Health Canada, the CFIA is developing a plan for modernizing compositional standards in the Food and Drugs Regulations and in the Safe Food for Canadian Regulations, when they come into force. This initiative aims to gauge stakeholder support for the proposed approach for modernizing standards and assessing readiness of commodity sectors. The consultation of stakeholders will continue and lead to draft proposals and regulatory amendments. The intent would also be to incorporate by reference the standards in the SFCR under the form of a Compendium of Standards.

The Canadian Food Safety Information Network (CFSIN) seeks to strengthen the ability to anticipate, detect and respond to food hazards. In partnership with the PHAC, HC and the provinces and territories, the CFIA will continue to build the collaborative network and plan the technical infrastructure required to share food safety data. The CFIA will also integrate multiple data repositories to ensure that complete, robust data sets are available for trending and analysis.

The CFIA will continue to modernize Canada's food safety system with the continuing development of a Risk Based Oversight (RBO) Framework. The risk assessment model will guide and support risk based decision making in an Integrated Agency Inspection Model (iAIM) by assessing food safety risks, which would lead to better allocation of inspection resources. This will provide CFIA with the ability to evaluate food safety risks across multiple food commodities and multiple business strategies.

Through the Food Safety Oversight initiative, the CFIA and HC are strengthening the food safety oversight of the fresh fruit and vegetable, fish and seafood and manufactured food products sectors. The CFIA will also provide functional direction and training to staff and guidance to industry, and continue to conduct foreign country assessments in priority areas to enhance the safety of imported food products.

As a result of feedback provided by stakeholders with regards to current labelling rules and standards of identity for food products, the CFIA is developing recommendations to help Canadians use label information better to make purchasing decisions. The CFIA's Food Labelling Modernization initiative will also support the food industry's need for innovation and better market access, and will ultimately result in a more modern and innovative food labelling system in Canada.

The Food Labelling Modernization initiative supports outcomes that will benefit all Canadians, including:

  • improved food safety oversight;
  • more information for consumers to make informed purchasing decisions;
  • improved regulations, policies and programs; and
  • better service delivery.

The next step is to develop recommendations and an implementation plan, including an approach to modernize food compositional standards by fall of 2016.

Sub-Program 1.1.1: Meat and Poultry

Description

The Meat and Poultry sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with meat and poultry and their products that are produced in Canada's federally registered establishments or imported for consumption. The program achieves its objectives by verifying that meat, poultry and their products meet health and safety requirements through verification of compliance with the relevant governing acts and regulations. The program also helps to mitigate unfair market practices related to labelling compliance for pre-packagedFootnote 7 meat products, and audits the delivery of a grading program based on objective meat quality and retail yield standards. The Meat and Poultry sub-program supports confidence in Canada's meat and poultry and their products.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
176,049,929 160,166,434 158,528,436
Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
1,530 1,515 1,513

The Planned Spending for the Meat and Poultry Program decreases by $17.5 million and 17 FTEs from 2016-17 to 2018-19. This decrease is primarily related to the sunsetting of funding for the Electronic Service Delivery Platform and Federal Infrastructure Initiatives.

Table 2-1b: Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Federally registered meat and poultry establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered meat and poultry establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 31 March 2017
Meat and poultry products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic meat and poultry products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 31 March 2017
Meat and poultry products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested imported meat and poultry products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 31 March 2017
Planning Highlights

Inspection Modernization to Enhance Food Safety and Market Access.

In 2016-17, the CFIA will continue to implement its Modernized Slaughter Inspection Program (MSIP) that streamlines and simplifies the food inspection system. MSIP is a single modernized inspection program for all species that is risk-based, optimized for current food safety and welfare hazards, affordable and recognized by trading partners.

A pilot for the MSIP will be initiated in swine, poultry and bovine slaughter establishments and will create opportunities for increased partnership between the CFIA, stakeholders, and key trading partners such as the USA. After the successful completion of the pilots, the high speed line inspection programs for beef, pork and poultry will be modified and streamlined.

Building Scientific Capacity and Partnerships to Support Decision-Making

As part of the Pathogen Reduction Initiative aimed at decreasing the levels of pathogens in meat and poultry, the CFIA will continue the work on establishing a baseline study on the prevalence of E. coli in beef and for Salmonella and Campylobacter in broiler chicken.

In 2016-17, the CFIA will finalize the analysis of the data from the pilot of the microbiological baseline study of beef carcasses and will engage stakeholders, other federal departments, provincial or territorial governments and industry to share with them the results of the data analysis and solicit input on the design of the 12 month baseline study on beef carcasses.

The CFIA will continue to actively participate in the work of the joint US-Canada Beyond the Borders (BtB) and Regulatory Cooperation Council (RCC) initiatives focusing on meat related issues.

Sub-Program 1.1.2: Egg

Description

The Egg sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with egg and egg products that are produced in Canada's federally registered establishments or imported for consumption. The program achieves its objectives by verifying that eggs and egg products are graded according to relevant governing acts and regulations and that they comply with the requirements of the said acts and regulations. The program also helps to mitigate unfair market practices by verifying that labelling and advertising practices meet the requirements for pre-packagedFootnote 7 egg products. This sub-program supports confidence in Canada's egg and egg products.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
9,674,342 8,563,012 8,488,407
Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
77 76 76

The Planned Spending for the Egg Program decreases by $1.2 million and 1 FTE from 2016-17 to 2018-19. This decrease is primarily related to the sunsetting of funding for the Electronic Service Delivery Platform and Federal Infrastructure Initiatives.

Table 2-1c: Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Federally registered shell egg establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered shell egg establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 31 March 2017
Shell egg and egg products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic shell egg and egg products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 31 March 2017
Shell egg and egg products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested imported shell egg and egg products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 31 March 2017
Planning Highlights

Regulatory Modernization to Enhance Safety and Efficiency

In 2016-17, Egg sub-program activities will continue to evolve under the Single Food Program until the integrated Agency Inspection Model is fully implemented. Efforts will continue, both within the Agency and in concert with other government departments such as Health Canada, towards improving the consistency in interpretation and delivery of the inspection program and to better focus inspection resources on areas with the greatest risk.

Sub-Program 1.1.3: Dairy

Description

The Dairy sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with dairy and dairy products that are produced in Canada's federally registered establishments or imported for consumption. The program achieves its objectives by verifying that dairy and dairy products meet health and safety requirements through verification of compliance with the governing acts and regulations. The program also helps to mitigate unfair market practices by verifying that labelling for pre-packaged6 dairy products meets the requirements as set out in the acts and regulations. This sub-program supports confidence in Canada's dairy products.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
15,352,392 13,669,166 13,549,683
Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
125 124 124

The Planned Spending for the Dairy Program decreases by $1.8 million and 1 FTE from 2016-17 to 2018-19. This decrease is primarily related to the sunsetting of funding for the Electronic Service Delivery Platform and Federal Infrastructure Initiatives.

Table 2-1d: Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Federally registered dairy establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered dairy establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 31 March 2017
Dairy products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic dairy products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 31 March 2017
Dairy products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested imported dairy products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 31 March 2017
Planning Highlights

Regulatory Modernization to Enhance Safety and Efficiency

In 2016–17, Dairy sub-program activities will continue to evolve under the Single Food Program, until the integrated Agency Inspection Model is implemented. Efforts will continue, both within the Agency and in concert with other government departments such as Health Canada, towards improving the consistency in interpretation and delivery of the inspection program and to better focus inspection resources on areas with the greatest risk.

Sub-Program 1.1.4: Fish and Seafood

Description

The Fish and Seafood sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with fish and seafood products processed in Canada's federally registered establishments or imported for consumption. It achieves its objectives by developing product and process standards and ensuring that products, importers and domestic industry comply with quality, safety and identity of fish and seafood requirements through verification of compliance with the governing acts and regulations. This sub-program supports confidence in Canada's fish and seafood products.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
66,832,526 50,388,109 49,994,918
Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
491 485 485

The Planned Spending for the Fish and Seafood Program decreases by $16.8 million and 6 FTEs from 2016-17 to 2018-19. This decrease is primarily related to the sunsetting of funding for the Electronic Service Delivery Platform and Federal Infrastructure Initiatives, as well as a small year-over-year decrease in Food Safety Oversight Initiative funding.

Table 2-1e: Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Federally registered fish and seafood establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered fish and seafood establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 31 March 2017
Fish and seafood products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic fish and seafood products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 31 March 2017
Fish and seafood products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested imported fish and seafood products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 31 March 2017
Planning Highlights

Regulatory Modernization to Enhance Safety and Efficiency

In 2016–17, Fish and Seafood sub-program activities will continue to evolve under the Single Food Program until the integrated Agency Inspection Model is fully implemented. Efforts will continue, both within the Agency and in concert with other government departments such as Health Canada, towards improving the consistency in interpretation and delivery of the inspection program and to better focus inspection resources on areas with the greatest risk.

The CFIA will continue its on-going work to participate in international technical working groups in an effort to maintain working relationship with key trading partners such and China, Russia and the EU.

In 2016-17, the Agency will incorporate the fish export certification program as part of Agency-wide inspection modernization, using preventative control plans.

Sub-Program 1.1.5: Fresh Fruit and Vegetables

Description

The Fresh Fruit and Vegetables sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with fresh fruits and vegetables and their products produced in Canada or imported for consumption. It achieves its objectives by verifying that products meet all stipulated health and safety requirements through verification of compliance with the relevant governing acts and regulations. This sub-program mitigates unfair market practices by verifying that labelling and net quantity requirements for pre-packagedFootnote 6 Fresh Fruit and Vegetable products are adhered to. This sub-program supports confidence in Canada's fresh fruit and vegetable products.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
38,588,926 34,775,125 34,582,125
Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
332 329 329

The Planned Spending for the Fresh Fruit and Vegetables decreases by $4.0 million and 3 FTEs from 2016-17 to 2018-19. This decrease is primarily related to the sunsetting of funding for the Electronic Service Delivery Platform and Federal Infrastructure Initiatives, as well as a small year-over-year decrease in Food Safety Oversight Initiative funding.

Table 2-1f: Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Federally registered fresh fruit and vegetables establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered fresh fruit and vegetable establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 31 March 2017
Fresh fruit and vegetable products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic fresh fruit and vegetable samples in compliance with federal regulations 95% 31 March 2017
Fresh fruit and vegetable products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested imported fresh fruit and vegetables samples in compliance with federal regulations 95% 31 March 2017
Planning Highlights

Regulatory Modernization to Enhance Safety and Efficiency

In 2016–17, Fresh Fruit and Vegetable sub-program activities will continue to evolve under the Single Food Program until the integrated Agency Inspection Model is fully implemented. Efforts will continue, both within the Agency and in concert with other government departments such as Health Canada, towards improving the consistency in interpretation and delivery of the inspection program and to better focus inspection resources on areas with the greatest risk.

In 2016-17, the CFIA will continue to phase in the implementation of a preventive food safety program for the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Subprogram that reflects modern approaches to food safety in this sector.

Sub-Program 1.1.6: Processed Products

Description

The Processed Products sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with processed products, including honey and maple products, which are produced in Canada or imported for consumption. The program achieves its objectives by verifying that processed products comply with health and food safety requirements through verification of compliance with the relevant governing acts and regulations. This sub-program minimizes unfair market practices by verifying that labelling and net quantity requirements for pre-packaged6 processed products are adhered to. The program supports confidence in Canada's processed products.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
9,919,851 9,013,015 8,934,200
Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
92 91 91

The Planned Spending for the Processed Products decreases by $1.0 million and 1 FTE from 2016-17 to 2018-19. This decrease is primarily related to the sunsetting of funding for the Electronic Service Delivery Platform and Federal Infrastructure Initiatives.

Table 2-1g: Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Federally registered processed products establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered processed products establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 31 March 2017
Processed products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic processed products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 31 March 2017
Processed products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested imported processed products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 31 March 2017
Planning Highlights

Regulatory Modernization to Enhance Safety and Efficiency

In 2016–17, Processed Products sub-program activities will continue to evolve under the Single Food Program until the integrated Agency Inspection Model is fully implemented. Efforts will continue, both within the Agency and in concert with other government departments such as Health Canada, towards improving the consistency in interpretation and delivery of the inspection program and to better focus inspection resources on areas with the greatest risk.

Sub-Program 1.1.7: Imported and Manufactured Food Products

Description

The Imported and Manufactured Food Products (IMFP) sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with food commodities that are regulated by the relevant governing acts and regulations. The CFIA and provincial/territorial governments share the jurisdiction over IMFP because the sector includes a large variety of foods that are traded intra-provincially or inter-provincially. This program achieves its objectives by verifying that these products comply with the health, food safety, and consumer protection requirements. The program mitigates unfair market practices by verifying that requirements related to net quantity, composition, claims, labelling, and advertising of these foods are adhered to and by enforcing the governing acts and regulations. Through enforcement of the acts and regulations, the program supports confidence in Canada's imported and manufactured food products.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
49,043,399 41,701,851 41,379,753
Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
469 465 465

The Planned Spending for the Imported and Manufactured Food Products decreases by $7.7 million and 4 FTEs from 2016-17 to 2018-19. This decrease is primarily related to the sunsetting of funding for the Electronic Service Delivery Platform and Federal Infrastructure Initiatives, as well as a small year-over-year decrease in Food Safety Oversight Initiative funding.

Table 2-1h: Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Risks to the Canadian public associated with imported and manufactured food (IMF) products are mitigated Percentage of major health risks in the imported and manufactured food sector that are addressed through the annual update to food safety inspection programs 100% 31 March 2017
Risks to the Canadian public associated with imported and manufactured food (IMF) products are mitigated Percentage of inspected IMF products with accurate net quantity, composition, labelling and advertising 70% 31 March 2017
Planning Highlights

Regulatory Modernization to Enhance Safety and Efficiency

In 2016–17, Imported and Manufactured Food Products sub-program activities will continue to evolve under the Single Food Program until the integrated Agency Inspection Model is fully implemented. Efforts will continue, both within the Agency and in concert with other government departments such as Health Canada, towards improving the consistency in interpretation and delivery of the inspection program and to better focus inspection resources on areas with the greatest risk.

Program 1.2: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

Description

The Animal Health and Zoonotics Program aims to mitigate risks to Canada's animal resource base, animal feeds and animal products, which are integral to a safe and accessible food supply system as well as to public health. The program achieves its objectives by mitigating risks to Canada's animals (including livestock and aquatic animals) from regulated diseases, managing animal disease emergencies and incidents, limiting risks to livestock and derived food products associated with feed, promoting animal welfare and guarding against deliberate threats to the animal resource base. The program helps to mitigate risks associated with animal diseases that can be transmitted to humans by controlling diseases within animal populations. This program supports the health of Canada's animal resources and instils confidence in the safety of Canada's animals, animal products and by-products, and production systems.

Budgetary Financial Resources – (dollars)
2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
137,163,046 138,055,855 123,478,947 123,478,947
Human Resources (Full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
1,023 1,021 1,021

The Planned Spending for the Animal Health and Zoonotics Program decreases by $14.6 million and 2 FTEs from 2016-17 to 2018-19, primarily due to the 2016-17 sunsetting of funding for the Federal Infrastructure Initiative.

Table 2-2a: Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Risks to Canadians from the transmission of animal diseases to humans are minimized Number of reportable animal diseases that have entered into Canada via specified regulated pathways 0 31 March 2017
Risks to Canadians from the transmission of animal diseases to humans are minimized Percentage of cases where investigations were completed following the positive identification of a reportable zoonotic disease 100% 31 March 2017
Domestic and imported animals and animal products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Percentage of legally exported animal and animal product shipments destined for foreign markets that meet certification requirements 99% 31 March 2017
Domestic and imported animals and animal products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Canada's status on the OIETable Note 8 disease risk status lists remains either "free, controlled risk, or negligible risk" Status maintained 31 March 2017
Risks to the Canadian animal resource base are mitigated Percentage of cases where investigations were completed following the positive identification of a reportable animal disease 100% 31 March 2017
Effective preparedness to prevent, control, and eradicate trans-boundary diseases and emerging diseases Manuals for CFIA officials are updated as needed All necessary manual updates are completed 31 March 2017
Effective preparedness to prevent, control, and eradicate trans-boundary diseases and emerging diseases Number of emergency preparedness simulation exercises in which CFIA participates 9 31 March 2017
Disease outbreaks in Canada are promptly and effectively responded to Percentage of detections of reportable transboundary diseases and significant emerging diseases in which an investigation was commenced in a timely fashion 100% 31 March 2017
Disease outbreaks in Canada are promptly and effectively responded to Percentage of cases where the CFIA communicated with key stakeholders in a timely fashion following the confirmation of a transboundary or significant emerging disease 100% 31 March 2017

Table Notes

Table Note 8

World Organisation for Animal Health

Return to table note 8  referrer

Planning Highlights

Regulatory Modernization to Enhance Safety and Market Access

To support improved disease control and surveillance more effectively, it is proposed that the Health of Animals Regulations be amended to broaden the scope from four to six farmed species (inclusion of cervid (deer, elk, and moose) and caprine (goat)). Further proposed amendments would include mandatory reporting of domestic livestock movement information, reduction in reporting times of animal identification and domestic livestock movement from less than 30 to less than seven days, and the reporting of premises identification numbers when the movement of livestock is being reported.

Regulations related to the humane transportation of animals are proposed to be updated to be more outcome-based, improving alignment with OIE guidance.

Engaging International Partners to Enhance Safety and Market Access

The CFIA will continue to work with trading partners to support trade and safeguard animal health. In 2016-17, the CFIA will work with the Government of New Zealand and the Government of Australia to develop an arrangement to recognize each other's zoning decisions in the event of a highly contagious foreign animal disease outbreak in any of the countries. This work builds upon the success of the Canada-U.S. Zoning arrangement that already includes Mexico.

Building Scientific Capacity and Partnerships to Support Decision-Making

To support a shared national vision for effective, responsive, and integrated animal health surveillance, the CFIA will continue the implementation of the Canadian Animal Health Surveillance Network (CAHSN). This network of networks across Canada will strengthen animal health surveillance, enable strategic use of technology, and enhance the Agency's ability to respond to emergencies. In 2016-17, the CFIA will seek and recruit volunteers for the key network groups and work with stakeholders to develop strategic plans and priorities.

In collaboration with PHAC and thirteen other multi-jurisdictional partners, the Centre for Emerging and Zoonotic Disease (CEZD) will continue to enhance intelligence generation and capacity for zoonotic and emerging diseases. Through the integration and distribution of intelligence and collaborative analysis of data on a shared IT platform, vulnerabilities related to risk identification will be addressed by this shared IT platform. The CFIA will begin implementation of the IT platform by broadening collaborative partnerships to maximise timely distribution of collected information that can be disseminated to the public for the use of the community via a range of communications channels.

Enhancing Service Excellence to Facilitate Market Access

To support modernized business processes, the CFIA will begin using e-Certification for the importation of feeder cattle and bison from the USA at four western Canadian points of entry. This will streamline resource use and strengthen trade.

Sub-Program 1.2.1: Terrestrial Animal Health

Description

The Terrestrial Animal Health sub-program aims to prevent the entry of reportable, foreign animal diseases and the spread of reportable domestic animal diseases as set out in the relevant governing acts and regulations. This sub-program achieves its objectives by delivering initiatives that track, detect, and mitigate risks to the terrestrial animal resource base. This sub-program supports food safety, public health, and protection of the animal resource base, and instils national and international confidence in Canadian agricultural products. Through verification of compliance, this sub-program supports domestic and international confidence that Canada's animals are free from certain reportable diseases, particularly those potentially transmissible to humans. This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Statutory Compensation Payments.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
117,666,129 103,100,500 103,100,500
Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
808 806 806

The Planned Spending for the Terrestrial Animal Heath decreases by $14.6 million and 2 FTEs from 2016-17 and 2018-19. The major item contributing to this decrease is the sunsetting of funding for the Federal Infrastructure Initiative.

Table 2-2b: Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Federally registered veterinary biologics establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered veterinary biologics establishments in compliance with federal regulations 90% 31 March 2017
Veterinary biological products in compliance with federal regulations Percentage of tested veterinary biological products in compliance with federal regulations 100% 31 March 2017
Animals in Canada are transported humanely Percentage of inspected live loads in compliance with humane transport standards 100% 31 March 2017
Planning Highlights

Enhancing Safety in Imported and Domestic Products

To facilitate exports while increasing domestic consumer confidence, and prepare for Canada's future OIE submission for Negligible Risk Status in 2020, the CFIA will implement adjustments to its BSE program.

The Traceability National Information Portal (TNIP) will be enhanced to further support the management of animal and public health issues. This portal, which tracks livestock identification, movement, location and health status information, allows the CFIA to more effectively respond to animal health issues and support market access. Through linkages with the Agency's Laboratory Sample Tracking System (LSTS) as well as information sharing agreements with provincial and territorial governments, the CFIA will realize more efficient responses to animal health issues.

Engaging International Partners to Enhance Safety

The CFIA will work with the USA and Mexico to expand the current strategy for managing Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD) Vaccine Antigens by including New Zealand and Australia in the arrangement. This arrangement allows Canada to leverage the emergency vaccine supplies to increase the available quantity in the event of an outbreak.

Sub-Program 1.2.2: Aquatic Animal Health

Description

The Aquatic Animal Health sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with the introduction and spread of certain aquatic animal diseases of concern to Canada. This program achieves its objectives by partnering with Fisheries and Oceans Canada to deliver on initiatives that track, detect and control aquatic animal diseases as set out in the relevant governing acts and regulations. Through verification of compliance, this sub-program supports domestic and international confidence that Canada's aquatic animal resources are free from aquatic animal diseases, and contributes to the sustainable productivity of aquaculture and harvest fisheries. This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Statutory Compensation Payments.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
3,992,234 3,990,006 3,990,006
Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
37 37 37

The Planned Spending for the Aquatic Animal Health Program remains stable from 2016-17 to 2018-19.

Table 2-2c: Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Domestic aquatic animals and their products are compliant with Canadian regulations and meet the standards of international agreements Percentage of certified aquatic animal and aquatic animal product shipments that meet the receiving country's import requirements 99% 31 March 2017
Risks to the Canadian aquatic animal resource base are mitigated Number of reportable aquatic animal diseases that have entered into Canada via specified regulated pathways 0 31 March 2017
Planning Highlights

Enhancing Safety in Imported and Domestic Products

As part of the final phase of the development of the National Aquatic Animal Health Program, the Domestic Movement Control Program for Aquatic Animals will be fully implemented. Upon completion of this phase, the CFIA and Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) will focus on stakeholder education and eliminating federal overlap.

Sub-Program 1.2.3: Feed

Description

The Feed sub-program aims to minimize risks associated with livestock and poultry feeds manufactured in or imported into Canada. The program achieves its objectives by verifying that feeds are safe, effective and labelled in accordance with the relevant governing acts and regulations. This sub-program contributes to the production and maintenance of a healthy and sustainable animal resource base which supports food safety and environmental sustainability. Through verification of compliance, this sub-program supports confidence in feed manufactured in Canada.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
16,397,492 16,388,441 16,388,441
Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
178 178 178

The Planned Spending for the Feed Program remains stable from 2016-17 to 2018-19.

Table 2-2d: Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Feed establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected feed establishments in compliance with Feeds Regulations and Health of Animals Regulations (Feed Ban), after follow-up, not including labelling tasks 95% 31 March 2017
Feed labels meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected feed facilities in compliance with Feeds Regulations and Health of Animals Regulations (Feed Ban), after follow-up, when assessed against inspection tasks associated with labelling 95% 31 March 2017
Planning Highlights

Regulatory Modernization to Enhance Safety and Efficiency

Safe food derived from healthy livestock is partly dependent on safe animal feeds. The CFIA will make amendments to the Feeds Regulations for better alignment with modern science and industry practices, reducing overlap and redundancy while providing clarity and flexibility to relevant parties. The amendments will align with the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations as well as Agency Transformation through Integrated Agency Inspection Model (iAIM). Pre-publication of the proposed package in the Canada Gazette, Part I, is targeted for winter 2017.

The modernized regulatory framework will:

  • help build a stronger, more transparent and flexible feed ingredient assessment and authorization process, which will constitute the basis for a safe and competitive feed supply chain;
  • adopt an outcome-based approach to feed safety, which will require regulated parties to conduct hazard identification and put in place preventive controls;
  • include a risk-based permissions (licencing/registration) regime;
  • increase flexibility in labelling requirements.

Building Scientific Capacity and Partnerships to Support Decision-Making

The CFIA will support PHAC in the development of a Pan-Canadian Framework to address antimicrobial resistance (AMR), which will contribute to a Canadian response to World Health Organization's tabling of the Global Action Plan on antimicrobial resistance.

Program 1.3: Plant Resources Program

Description

The Plant Resources Program aims to mitigate risks to Canada's plant resource base, which is integral to a safe and accessible food supply, as well as to public health and environmental sustainability. The program achieves its objectives by regulating agricultural and forestry products; mitigating risks to the plant resource base (including crops and forests) from regulated pests and diseases; regulating the safety and integrity of seeds, fertilizers and plant products; and managing plant health emergencies and incidents. The program also guards against deliberate threats to the plant resource base, facilitates the introduction of emerging plant technologies and protects the rights of plant breeders. Achieving the objectives of the program instils confidence in Canada's plants, plant production systems and plant products, and contributes to the health of Canada's plant resources.

Budgetary Financial Resources – (dollars)
2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
93,368,850 93,894,697 78,723,209 78,723,209
Human Resources (Full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
756 753 753

The Planned Spending for the Plant Resources Program decreases by $15.2 million and 3 FTEs from 2016-17 and 2018-19. The major item contributing to this decrease is the sunsetting of funding for the Federal Infrastructure Initiative.

Table 2-3a: Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Risks to the Canadian plant resource base from imported plants and plant products are mitigated Number of regulated foreign plant pests that enter into Canada through regulated pathways and establish themselves 0 31 March 2017
Domestic plants and plant products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Percentage of domestic seed, crop inputs and plants with novel traits in compliance with Canadian regulations and international agreements 90% 31 March 2017
Confirmed introductions of quarantine pests in Canada are contained and risk- mitigated (e.g. through the issuance of Notices of Prohibition of Movement, Quarantine, up to and including the issuance of Ministerial Orders) Percentage of confirmed introductions of quarantine pests for which notices are issued 100% 31 March 2017
Confirmed introductions of quarantine pests in Canada are contained and risk- mitigated (e.g. through the issuance of Notices of Prohibition of Movement, Quarantine, up to and including the issuance of Ministerial Orders) Percentage of notices issued in a timely manner 90% 31 March 2017
Canadian exports of plants and plant products meet the country of destination regulatory requirements and Canada's reputation is maintained Percentage of certified plants and plant products shipment (lots) that meet the country of destination phytosanitary import requirements 99% 31 March 2017
Planning Highlights

Regulatory Modernization to Enhance Safety and Efficiency

The Agency will continue to update regulations under the Plant Protection Act, with emphasis on risk-based approaches and outcome-based regulations. This approach intends to reduce the regulatory burden on products that pose lower risk. This will provide greater flexibility for CFIA to shift inspection resources to higher risk areas and reduce the overall regulatory burden for producers, processors, shippers, importers, and other regulated parties.

Facilitating Market Access

To facilitate the timely export of Canadian grain, the Agency will begin to redesign the Grain Export Certification program with a view to improving the timeliness of weed seed examination. This will help the Agency enhance the efficient use of its inspection resources as well as align the program with the Agency's integrated inspection model and explore options for alternative service delivery.

Building Scientific Capacity and Partnerships to Support Decision-Making

The Agency is committed to developing a national network of experts in plant health to resolve collective challenges concerning plant health issues. This would provide more access to specialized knowledge and expertise to complement existing resources in support of regulatory and policy decisions and conclusions.

Partnering with Provincial and Territorial Governments

The Agency will continue work on developing the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Strategic Emergency Management Framework (SEMF), a common approach on managing emergencies in the agricultural sector which impacts both plant health and animal health programs.

SEMF development will enable Federal-Provincial-Territorial partners to develop a National Plant and Animal Health Strategy, which is integral to the SEMF. The Strategy aims to bring federal and provincial governments closer in managing animal health and plant health risks and maintaining an innovative, safer, and stronger Canada.

Sub-Program 1.3.1: Plant Protection

Description

The Plant Protection sub-program aims to mitigate the risks associated with the introduction and spread of plant pests of quarantine significance to Canada. This sub- program achieves its objectives by delivering initiatives that track, detect and control, or eradicate regulated plant pests and diseases as set out in the relevant governing acts and regulations. The program verifies that plants and plant products, and their associated risk pathways, meet phytosanitary requirements. Through verification of compliance, this sub- program supports environmental sustainability and public health and instils confidence in Canada's plants and plant products. This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Statutory Compensation Payments.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
75,805,600 63,582,843 63,582,843
Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
607 604 604

The Planned Spending for the Plant Protection Program decreases by $12.2 million and 3 FTEs from 2016-17 to 2018-19. This decrease is primarily related to the sunsetting of funding for the Federal Infrastructure Initiative.

Table 2-3b: Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Pre-border plant pest risks are mitigated Percentage of inspected shipments from off-shore system approaches or pre-clearance programs in compliance with federal regulations 85% 31 March 2017
At-border plant pest risks are mitigated Percentage of pre-arrival documentation that is in compliance with plant pest-related import requirements 90% 31 March 2017
Post-border plant pest risks are mitigated Percentage of new pest detections that have a science based management plan initiated within one year 90% 31 March 2017
Planning Highlights

Enhancing Safety in Imported and Domestic Products

The Canadian position on import requirements, which aims to reduce risks related to the introduction of regulated pests through volume and diversity of grain imports, will be advanced at the World Trade Organization. In 2016-17, Canada will conduct consultations at the World Trade Organization with a view to implement a new policy on import requirements the following fiscal year.

Partnering with the USA to Enhance Plant Resource Safety

Canada will continue to work with the U.S. on a North American perimeter approach to plant protection, including identifying projects to implement under the Canada-U.S. Perimeter Approach Framework to minimize unintentional introduction of pests and invasive alien species through plant and plant product movements.

The CFIA will continue to collaborate with the U.S. on the Asian Gypsy Moth (AGM) program to further the AGM certification program under the Beyond the Border Initiative. With the success of this program, Canada and the U.S. will expand joint assessments and audits for plant, animal and food safety systems to third countries, such as Mexico, New Zealand, and Russia. The Agency will also explore the potential for expanding the AGM program to other commodities through the Integrated Cargo Security Strategy.

In 2016-17, to mitigate the risk of pest introductions from shipments transiting Canada, the Agency will finalize the national In-Transit Policy and Program. This will provide a consistent approach to addressing non-compliance while facilitating trade between the United States and Canada.

Sub-Program 1.3.2: Seed

Description

The Seed sub-program aims to ensure that seeds sold in Canada meet established standards, that seeds are properly represented in the marketplace and that most agricultural crop kinds are registered before entering the marketplace. The program achieves its objectives by verifying that seeds meet quality, biosafety, labelling and registration standards as set out in the relevant governing acts and regulations. Regulating the environmental release of plants with novel traits contributes to environmental sustainability and the health and safety of Canadians. Furthermore, quality assured and accurately labelled seeds contribute to a prosperous agricultural production system and to domestic and international confidence in Canada's seeds.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
12,912,971 9,968,461 9,968,461
Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
104 104 104

The Planned Spending for the Seed sub-program decreases by $2.9 million from 2016-17 to 2018-19. This decrease is primarily related to the sunsetting of funding for the Federal Infrastructure Initiative.

Table 2-3c: Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Seed complies with federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic pedigreed seed lots in compliance with federal regulations 95% 31 March 2017
Seed complies with federal regulations Percentage of authorized confined releases of Plants with Novel Traits (PNTs) into the Canadian environment that are in compliance with the authorized conditions 90% 31 March 2017
Planning Highlights

Regulatory Modernization to Enhance Safety and Efficiency

The Agency will continue to review and modernize seed regulations to foster innovation and allow it to use a more risk-based approach towards seed inspection.

Sub-Program 1.3.3: Fertilizer

Description

The Fertilizer sub-program aims to ensure that regulated fertilizer, fertilizer/pesticides and supplement products sold in Canada are properly labelled, effective and safe for humans, plants, animals, and the environment. The program achieves its objectives by verifying that all fertilizers and supplements meet the standards for safety and efficacy as set out in the relevant governing acts and regulations. Through verification of compliance, the program contributes to public health and environmental sustainability and supports domestic and international confidence in fertilizers manufactured in Canada.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
3,533,897 3,531,082 3,531,082
Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
36 36 36

The Planned Spending for the Fertilizer remains stable from 2016-17 to 2018-19.

Table 2-3d: Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Fertilizer and supplement products meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected fertilizer and supplement products in compliance with federal regulations (Fertilizers Regulations) 90% 31 March 2017
Fertilizer and supplement products meet federal regulations Percentage of submissions reviewed within the prescribed service delivery standards 90% 31 March 2017
Planning Highlights

Regulatory Modernization to Enhance Safety and Efficiency

The CFIA will review the fertilizer regulations as part of the Agency's review of its regulatory modernization priorities in light of Government priorities and objectives.

Sub-Program 1.3.4: Intellectual Property Rights

Description

The Intellectual Property Rights sub-program, by which plant breeders can obtain intellectual property rights for their new plant varieties, aims to create an environment in Canada which supports innovation in plant breeding, as set out in the relevant governing act and regulations. This sub-program achieves its objectives by assessing applications from plant breeders to determine that new plant varieties meet the criteria for protection, and when all requirements have been met, granting rights to the variety breeder/owner for a period of up to 18 years. The owner of a new variety who receives a grant of rights has exclusive rights over use of the variety, and will be able to protect his/her new variety from exploitation by others. By enforcing the relevant governing act and regulations, this sub-program stimulates plant breeding in Canada, facilitates better access to foreign varieties for Canadian producers and supports the protection of Canadian varieties in other countries.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
1,642,229 1,640,823 1,640,823
Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
9 9 9

The Planned Spending for the Intellectual Property Rights Program remains stable from 2016-17 to 2018-19.

Table 2-3e: Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Plant breeders develop new varieties for the Canadian market Applications for Plant Breeders' Rights protection are advanced according to mandated timeframes through publication in the Plant Varieties Journal (as measured by the date of publication) 100% 31 March 2017
Planning Highlights

The Agency will continue to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the Plant Breeders' Rights program. The CFIA will continue to encourage investment in plant breeding in Canada and foster more accessibility to foreign seed varieties for farmers which allows them to be more competitive in the global marketplace.

The Agency will consult with stakeholders on a future policy for the "farmer's privilege" element within the Plant Breeders' Rights Act (PBRA), and the development of regulations.

Program 1.4: International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

Description

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency's International Collaboration and Technical Agreements program contributes to a coherent, predictable, and science-based international regulatory framework that facilitates meeting regulatory requirements of importing countries' food, animals and plants, and their products, resulting in the facilitation of multi-billion dollar trade for the Canadian economy. The program achieves its objectives through actively participating in international fora for the development of international science-based rules, standards, guidelines and policies and the management of sanitary and phytosanitary committees established under international agreements. The CFIA's active promotion of the Canadian science-based regulatory system with foreign trading partners and negotiations to resolve scientific and technical issues contribute to market access.

Budgetary Financial Resources – (dollars)
2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
31,045,476 35,727,492 35,727,492 35,727,492
Human Resources (Full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
343 343 343

The Planned Spending for the International Collaboration and Technical Agreements Program remains fairly stable from 2016-17 to 2018-19.

Table 2-4a: Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Canadian interests are reflected in science-based international rules, standards, Free Trade Agreements, and technical arrangements through effective participation in Sanitary and Phytosanitary (SPS) negotiations and International Standards Setting Bodies (ISSB) such as Codex, OIE, and IPPC Number of key sanitary and phytosanitary negotiations and international standards setting bodies meetings where the CFIA promoted Canada's interests 36 31 March 2017
International markets are accessible to Canadian food, animals, plants, and their products Number of unjustified non- tariff barriers resolved 45 31 March 2017
International regulatory cooperation, relationship building and technical assistance activities that are in line with the CFIA's mandate Number of senior level CFIA- led committees with foreign regulatory counterparts 4 31 March 2017
International regulatory cooperation, relationship building and technical assistance activities that are in line with the CFIA's mandate Number of CFIA-led technical assistance activities provided to foreign national governments 8 31 March 2017
Planning Highlights

As Canada's largest science-based regulatory agency, the CFIA is an active participant in the development of international rules and standards for food safety, animal and plant resources health. The CFIA will continue to lead Canada's participation in the World Trade Organization Sanitary and Phytosanitary (SPS) Committee, the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), the International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC), the North American Plant Protection Organization (NAPPO) and will continue to partner with Health Canada at Codex Alimentarius.

Through these engagements, Canada influences the development of rules and standards that are consistent with Canada's needs and objectives, and encourages harmonization on matters related to food safety, plant resources, animal health and zoonotics, and consumer protection. Engagement approaches include formal bilateral mechanisms established under international agreements and arrangements, ad hoc mechanisms, and technical cooperation activities. In addition, Canada promotes its regulatory approaches, encourages the adoption of risk and science-based regulations and associated best practices on a global level.

For example, the CFIA will collaborate with other government departments to:

  • Expand markets for shellfish (Mexico and Chile) and meat (Brazil and Argentina)
  • Renew trade arrangements for shellfish from Korea

The CFIA will continue to engage and cooperate with international regulatory counterparts in like-minded and emerging economies (e.g., US, European Union (EU), China, India) in order to strengthen and expand partnerships to:

  • Help manage risks before they arrive at the Canadian border, and
  • Share/learn best regulatory practices and strengthen capacity in the international regulatory framework to achieve food safety, animal health and plant health objectives.

The CFIA will continue engagement with the U.S. under the Regulatory Cooperation Council (RCC) and the Beyond the Border (BtB) initiative to contribute to a greater alignment of regulatory approaches while maintaining high standards for food safety, animal health and plant health. In 2016-17, the CFIA will focus on completing existing initiatives, examining permanent alignment mechanisms through cooperative arrangements with the United States.

Key initiatives include:

  • Continuing work on cooperation and coordination on meat inspection and certification to ensure the safety of meat imports from the United States while reducing the administrative burden for business
  • Development of a two-year implementation and outreach plan on a wood packaging project under the RCC which better ensures predictability to the implementation between the two countries.
  • Cooperation on systems recognition for shellfish to protect Canadians from the health risks associated with the consumption of contaminated bivalve molluscan shellfish (for example, mussels, oysters and clams) and providing technical assistance to resolve trade disruptions where possible.

As part of the Safe Food for Canadians Action Plan, the CFIA is developing a policy to guide the determination and application of foreign system recognition and equivalency agreements.

The CFIA will also continue to actively promote the Canadian science-based regulatory system with counterparts in key trading countries and enter into negotiations, to resolve scientific and technical issues and to support greater market access for the Canadian agriculture industry.

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. Internal services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization, and not those provided to a specific program. The groups of activities are Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Budgetary Financial Resources – (dollars)
2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
113,578,857 113,999,756 112,417,466 112,417,466
Human Resources (Full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
749 749 749

The Planned Spending for Internal Services decreases by $1.6 million from 2016-17 to 2018-19 mainly due to a small year-over-year decrease in Food Safety Oversight Initiative funding, while FTEs remain stable.

Planning Highlights

Enhancing Privacy Protection

The CFIA will continue to strengthen the Agency's privacy protection practices and mitigate risks. In 2014-15, the CFIA developed a three-year Agency plan aimed at increasing internal awareness about privacy protection and developing a suite of policy tools to assist managers and staff in their day-to-day activities. In 2016-17, the CFIA will implement various components identified in the second year of the three-year plan to ensure continued protection of privacy for both employees and our stakeholders. These components include the privacy oversight function and Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) policy tools.

Web Renewal

The Web Renewal Initiative is a Government-wide priority that will see all departmental and agency web sites consolidated into fewer than six Government of Canada web sites. The flagship Canada.ca website was launched in December 2013, and the deadline for content migration of all website information is December 2016.

Throughout 2016-2017, in order to make it easier for Canadians to find and access information while its website is being migrated to Canada.ca, the CFIA will continue to create, update, and maintain its web content, including web information for consumers and regulated parties.

Digital Communications

Canadians are increasingly receiving and sharing information in digital formats using online and mobile technologies. For this reason, moving to a "digital by default" approach to communicating with Canadians is a Government of Canada and a CFIA priority.

During 2016-2017, the CFIA will continue to execute its digital communications implementation plan to make the digital communications vision a reality. This includes putting in place the requirements to deliver on visually appealing social media messages, compelling content, detailed infographics, multimedia projects, and social media pilots. By adopting web and social media engagement strategies, CFIA will be able to reach new audiences and interact with them in almost real time.

Enhancing Project Management

To foster enhanced planning and project management in 2016-17, the CFIA will continue to enhance and mature its investment planning management control and project management frameworks, and it will continue to adhere to Treasury Board Secretariat (TBS) policies and guidelines, and will focus on:

  • Develop and implement an Investment Planning Performance Measurement Framework;
  • Guide annual and long-term planning of investments to ensure sound stewardship and value for money – selecting the right investments aligned with organizational priorities as well as balancing the investment portfolio to provide support to all activities. The introduction of the Business Model, the Agency architectures and e-Agency will provide strategic and operational guidance for investment decision-making
  • Implement a Project Management Development Program to ensure the necessary expertise and capacity are in place to support the implementation of the Enterprise Project Management Framework (ePMF) and provide the required project management competencies. The implementation of this program will enhance the CFIA's advancement in project management maturity.

Contributing to Environmental Sustainability through the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)

The CFIA is a voluntary participant in the 2013-2016 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy. Details on the Agency's activities in this area can be found in the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy Supplementary Information Table in the RPP.

The CFIA contributes to the FSDS's Theme IV (Shrinking the Environmental Footprint – Beginning with Government) targets through the internal services program. The Agency plans to:

  • Reduce the departmental greenhouse gas emissions from its fleet by 13% below 2005 levels by 2020; and
  • Take action to embed environmental considerations into public procurement, in accordance with the Federal Policy on Green Procurement.

Modernizing and Consolidating Information Technology (IT) Applications to Enhance Service and Efficiency

As part of the Government of Canada (GoC) collective, the Agency is obligated to support many initiatives focusing on the standardization and centralization of IT applications, including Email Transformation Initiative (ETI), and Shared Services Canada (SSC) Data Center Migration. In line with GoC priorities, the CFIA will continue to align, modernize and streamline its applications base to increase efficiency, enhance security, reduce duplication, costs, and allow the CFIA to move to a single inspection application for all commodities.

Human Resources

The Agency will develop relations with post-secondary institutions and establish an online presence in the recruitment spheres.

Business Continuity

The CFIA will continue to align its business continuity plans with its business transformation processes. In addition, the CFIA will regularly update plans to reflect changes and find efficiencies. This will allow the Agency to maintain essential business functions during emergencies.

Section III: Supplementary Information

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations

The Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations provides a general overview of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's operations. The forecast of financial information on expenses and revenues is prepared on an accrual accounting basis to strengthen accountability and to improve transparency and financial management.

Because the Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations is prepared on an accrual accounting basis, and the forecast and planned spending amounts presented in other sections of the Report on Plans and Priorities are prepared on an expenditure basis, amounts differ.

A more detailed Future-Oriented Statement of OperationsEndnote xxi and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net cost of operations to the requested authorities, can be found on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's website.

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations
For the Year Ended March 31
(in thousands of dollars)
Financial information 2015-16
Forecast Results
2016-17
Planned Results
Difference
(2016–17 Planned Results minus 2015–16 Forecast Results)
Total expenses 828,937 821,591 (7,346)
Total revenues 52,629 52,610 (19)
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 776,308 768,981 (7,327)

The forecast results for fiscal year 2015-16 and planned results for fiscal year 2016-17 are fairly constant. The new funding received through capital vote for the Federal Infrastructure Initiative (FII) and the Electronic Services Delivery Platform (ESDP) will increase the Agency's Capital Assets in the future and impact expenses when amortized. Note that the majority of the Agency's revenues are considered re-spendable via statutory authority. The Main Estimates figure for statutory revenues was therefore used as a base to estimate revenues earned for both 2015-16 and 2016-17.

Supplementary Information Tables

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

1. Overview of the Federal Government's Approach to Sustainable Development

The Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) 2013–16 presents the Government of Canada's sustainable development activities, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act. In keeping with the objectives of the Act to make environmental decision making more transparent and accountable to Parliament, the CFIA supports the implementation of the FSDS through the activities in this supplementary information table.

Although CFIA is not bound by the Federal Sustainable Development Act and is not required to develop a departmental sustainable development strategy, the CFIA contributes to Theme III – Protecting Nature and Canadians, and Theme IV – Shrinking the Environmental Footprint – Beginning with Government.

2. Themes I to III: Department- and Agency-Led Targets

Not applicable for CFIA

3. Themes I to III: Implementation Strategies

CFIA participates in six implementation strategies through ongoing activities in its Plant Resources Program (PAA 1.3.) and Plant Protection Sub-Program (PAA 1.3.1.). The implementation strategies support the FSDS Theme III.

Target 4.6: Invasive Alien Species (By 2020, pathways of invasive alien species introductions are identified, and risk-based intervention or management plans are in place for priority pathways and species) in Goal 4.

Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians.

Applicable CFIA Implementation Strategies:
  • 4.6.2 Implement activities and strategic objectives with a focus on preventing and limiting new invasive species from entering Canada so that entry and domestic spread of invasive plants and plant pests is managed and response to invasive plants and plant pests is planned and implemented.
    • Performance indicators: Activities to implement the Invasive Alien Species Strategy for Canada (2004) as it relates to preventing the introduction and spread of new and emerging invasive plants and plant pests.
    • Expected results: Programs and policies related to the practical prevention, early detection, response and management of invasive plants and plant pests activities identified within the Strategy and the Plant Protection mandate are implemented.
  • 4.6.7 Develop and implement a risk analysis framework (i.e., risk assessment, risk management and risk communication) and a pathway approach in regulating invasive alien species in Canada so that entry and domestic spread of invasive plants and plant pests is managed and response to invasive plants and plant pests is planned and implemented.
    • Performance indicators: Conducting risk categorizations and risk assessments, and developing risk management options, risk analysis documents, response plans and fact sheets.
    • Expected results: High-risk invasive species and their pathways are identified by implementing a science-based risk analysis framework. Tools and capabilities for pest identification, monitoring and evaluating pest risk and spread are developed, and identification-sharing among federal, provincial and territorial partners to ensure efficient information generation, communication and response to new invasive species is facilitated.
  • 4.6.8 Engage in partnerships with provincial governments, industry, and stakeholders in responding to invasive species within Canada in order to increase stakeholder and partner cooperation, stakeholder and partner awareness of plants and plant pests, and compliance with policies and regulations.
    • Performance indicators: Partnership with provincial invasive species councils as well as with agricultural, forestry, and environmental stakeholders. Consolations with Canadians on regulatory options and decisions through tools such as Risk Analysis Documents.
    • Expected results: Increased engagement and cooperation to ensure transparent decision making in response to invasive alien species in Canada. Information sharing among federal departments is facilitated and scientific tools and expertise are developed, and support and training are provided to partners and stakeholders on how to conduct a risk assessment and in developing risk analyses and response plans.
  • 4.6.9 Cooperate with United States (U.S.) and international regulators to inspect vessels to ensure compliance with Canadian regulations. (CFIA, TC)
    • Performance indicators: Based on requirements of the Plant Protection Act, conducting Asian Gypsy Moth (AGM) compliance verification inspections of vessels, collecting and compiling compliance data for AGM program maintenance and enhancement.
    • Expected results: Collaboration with the U.S., AGM-regulated countries and others on enhancing and expanding the AGM Vessel Pre-departure Certification Program to prevent the introduction of AGM to North America by mitigating the risk at origin.
  • 4.6.10 In collaboration with Canada Border Services Agency, prevent the introduction and rapid dispersal of invasive species and diseases into Canada via land, air and marine ports of entry, thus reducing potential deleterious effects to ecosystems, economies and society. (CFIA, CBSA)
    • Performance indicators: Prevention of the introduction and spread of invasive species into Canada through vessel inspections at marine ports of entry under the AGM program as well as through compliance verification inspections and review for other invasive species at airports and post offices.
    • Expected results: The introduction and spread of invasive species into Canada through specified pathways is prevented by refining and implementing the invasive alien species programs through the development and adoption of policies and programs on phytosanitary requirements.
  • 4.6.11 Foster international, national and provincial collaborative arrangements and partnerships with industry to prevent the introduction to and limit the spread of invasive plants and plant pests in Canada. This will increase stakeholder and partner awareness of invasive species which is expected to increase cooperation and compliance with policies and regulations. Increased international engagement, cooperation and awareness of invasive species issues in Canada will contribute to ensuring that international standards and processes reflect Canadian interests.
    • Performance indicators: Collaborating with stakeholders, governments, and industry to foster a greater awareness of invasive species, their pathways of introduction, and the CFIA's policies and programs, and promotion of compliance with Canada's phytosanitary requirements.
    • Expected results: Risks to Canada's plant resource base from imported plants and plant products are mitigated.
4. Theme IV: Targets and Implementation Strategies
Goal 6: GHG Emissions and Energy

Target 6.1: GHG Emissions Reduction

The Government of Canada will reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from its buildings and fleets by 17% below 2005 levels by 2020.

Departmental Target

13% below 2005 levels by 2020

Performance Measurement

Expected result
Reduce the carbon footprint and energy consumption of federal operations
Performance indicator Targeted performance level
GHG emissions (kt CO2 equivalent) in fiscal year 2005–06 6.43 kt
GHG emissions (kt CO2 equivalent) in fiscal year 2016−17 5.69 kt
Percentage change in GHG emissions from fiscal year 2005–06 to fiscal year 2015−16, inclusive of renewable power emission credits, if applicable 13% decrease
Adjustments made to base year GHG emissions [indicate if not applicable] n/a
Goal 7: Waste and Asset Management

Target 7.2: Green Procurement

As of April 1, 2014, the Government of Canada will continue to take action to embed environmental considerations into public procurement, in accordance with the federal Policy on Green Procurement.

Performance Measurement

Expected result
Environmentally responsible acquisition, use and disposal of goods and services
Performance indicator Targeted performance level
Departmental approach to further the implementation of the Policy on Green Procurement in place as of April 1, 2014

Target = Planned completion date March 31, 2016

Strategies/Comments
By March 31, 2016, the CFIA will update its contracting directive to make procuring goods and services from the Certified Green Suppliers List a priority

Number and percentage of procurement and/or materiel management specialists who completed the Canada School of Public Service Green Procurement course (C215) or equivalent, in fiscal year 2016-17

Target = 100%

Strategies/Comments
Materiel managers and procurement personnel are identified only as those who work in CFIA's Contracting and Procurement Policy Division

Number and percentage of managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel whose performance evaluation includes support and contribution toward green procurement, in fiscal year 2016-17

Target = 100%

Strategies/Comments
The number of identified positions is three; two procurement managers and the fleet manager. The requirement will be added in the identified employees' annual Talent Management Questionnaires

Departmental green procurement targetFootnote 9

By March 31, 2017, 90% of vehicles purchased annually are from the Pre-Authorized Vehicle List (PAVL).

Performance indicator Targeted performance level
Number of vehicles purchased from the PAVL, relative to the number of vehicles purchased in each fiscal year

80% by 2015-2016
90% by 2016-2017

Strategies/Comments
The target does not include farm equipment, boats, ATVs or snowmobiles. The tracking for this target is done through a consolidated acquisition spreadsheet. The PAVL is distributed via email to all stakeholders every year in advance of vehicle procurement

Implementation strategy element or best practice Targeted performance level
7.2.1.5. Leverage common-use procurement instruments where available and feasible

50% by 2015-2016
75% by 2016-2017

Strategies/Comments
By March 31, 2017, 75% of all Call-ups for goods issued by the National Procurement and Contracting Service Centre will use Green Standing Offers where available or feasible

Best Practice
7.2.3. Train acquisition cardholders on green procurement

Achieved 100% since 2012

Strategies/Comments
As of March 2012, all new CFIA Acquisition Cardholders (AC) are required to complete the Canada School of Public Service online course on green procurement. Data is collected manually from Finance data. CFIA has a process to ensure that all new AC Cardholders take the Green Procurement Course as a pre-requisite to receiving their AC card

5. Additional Departmental Sustainable Development Activities and Initiatives

Not applicable for CFIA

6. Sustainable Development Management System

Not applicable for CFIA

7. Strategic Environmental Assessment

The CFIA ensures that its decision-making process includes a consideration of the FSDS goals and targets through a strategic environmental assessment (SEA). A SEA for policy, plan or program proposals includes an analysis of the impacts of the proposal on the environment, including on the FSDS goals and targets. The results of SEAs are made public when an initiative is announced or approved, demonstrating that environmental factors were integrated into the decision-making process.

Disclosure of TPPs under $5 Million

Name of Transfer Payment Program (S) Compensation payments in accordance with requirements established by Regulations under the Health of Animals Act and the Plant Protection Act, and authorized pursuant to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act (S.C., 1997, c.6)
End Date Ongoing
Type of Transfer Payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Statutory authority under the Health of Animals Act and the Plant Protection Act
Link to Department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 1.2: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

  • Terrestrial Animal Health Sub-Program $2,300,000
  • Aquatic Animal Health Sub-Program $900,000

Program 1.3: Plant Resources Program

  • Plant Protection Sub-Program $300,000
Main Objective To compensate Canadians, in accordance with the appropriate regulations, for plants or animals ordered destroyed for the purpose of disease control.
Planned Spending for 2016-17 $3,500,000
Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation N/A
General Targeted Recipient Groups

Canadians who have had animals ordered destroyed for the purpose of disease control.

Canadians who have had plants ordered destroyed for the purpose of disease control.

Name of Transfer Payment Program Federal Assistance Program (FAP)
End Date Ongoing
Type of Transfer Payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Main Objective The FAP supports projects and initiatives that advance the CFIA's strategic outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.
Link to Department's Program Alignment Architecture Program

1.2: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

  • Terrestrial Animal Health Sub-Program $98,200
  • Aquatic Animal Health Sub-Program $39,400
  • Feed $15,000

Program 1.4: International Collaboration and Technical Agreements $666,400

Planned Spending for 2016-17 $819,000
Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation 2010-11
General Targeted Recipient Groups Eligible recipients include those whose goals and objectives are complementary to and supportive of the CFIA's mission and strategic outcome. This includes individuals, groups of individuals, agriculture and commodity organizations and conservation districts.

Horizontal Initiatives

As of 2016-17 the Plum Pox Management and Monitoring Program (PPMMP) will no longer be reported as a horizontal initiative. PPMMP has been reported as a horizontal initiative since its launch in 2011-12. However, funding for the program has now reached an ongoing state. Therefore, PPMMP is now part of the ongoing program delivery and reporting is consolidated within Section II of the Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) and Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs). Past PPMMP horizontal initiative reports can be found in Supplementary Information Tables of RPPs and DPRs.

Initial funding approvals for the Food Safety Modernization (FSM) initiative sunsets in 2015-16. The level of resources required for this initiative will be assessed and renewal will be sought during the 2016-17 fiscal year. As a result, horizontal initiative reporting has not been included in the 2016-17 RPP. Should funding be renewed during 2016-17, horizontal reporting will be included in the 2016-17 DPR.

General Information
Name of horizontal initiative Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) Renewal
Name of lead department(s) Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Federal partner organization(s) Health Canada (HC); Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)
Non-federal and non-governmental partner(s) Not Applicable
Start date of the horizontal initiative 2003-04, 2014-15 Renewal Core BSE program
End date of the horizontal initiative 2018-19
Total federal funding allocated (start to end date) $203,229,461 (from 2014-15 to 2018-19)
Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners Not Applicable
Description of the horizontal initiative

To protect human and animal health, the BSE program conducts surveillance, research and risk assessments on BSE and other transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) to minimize the risk of exposure to infected materials, maintain consumer confidence through assessment of the effectiveness of the risk mitigation measures and having measures in place to control any potential outbreaks. The BSE program supports market access for cattle, beef and related products by promoting and explaining Canada's BSE program to domestic and international stakeholders.

HC conducts research and risk assessments on human exposure to BSE and other TSEs, and the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) carries out surveillance of human TSEs and targeted supporting research in this area. The CFIA enforces the removal of specified risk material (SRM) from the animal feed and the human food chains, monitors products entering and leaving Canada for adherence to Canadian standards or the standards of the importing country, monitors for the prevalence of BSE in the cattle population (through surveillance), verifies that measures to control potential outbreaks are in place and explains Canada's BSE control measures to domestic and international stakeholders (for example, through the veterinarians abroad program) in order to maintain confidence in Canada's BSE program.

Shared outcome(s) Contributing to the protection of human and animal health, which supports domestic and international market access for Canadian cattle, beef and beef products.
Governance structures The CFIA is the federal lead for BSE Program delivery. A summative evaluation of the CFIA's BSE program conducted in 2008 recommended the governance of the program be strengthened to enhance coordination and communication regarding BSE-related activities, both internally and with partner organizations. Based on that recommendation and consistent with governance models for related horizontal initiatives, the CFIA launched a new committee structure to bring the Agency's overall governance approach more in line with evolving business needs in 2015. The new governance structure enhances whole-of-Agency information sharing and integration and ensures a more efficient and streamlined senior-level committee structure. It is expected that the renewed structure will foster a whole-of-Agency approach to decision making and will support day-to-day operations across the Agency. To ensure that business line perspectives are integrated into decision-making process, three senior executive-level committees on Animal Health, Plant and Food Safety are supported.
Planning highlights For 2016-17, the key plans and priorities from a horizontal perspective are to continue to deliver the BSE Program by managing and monitoring BSE-related risks to current standards as well as to continue to improve communication and coordination (for example, governance), performance measurement and reporting, and financial tracking.
Results to be achieved by non-federal and non-governmental partners Not Applicable
Contact information

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Dr. Harpreet Kochhar
Chief Veterinary Officer
613-773-6162

Public Health Agency of Canada
Steven Sternthal
Director General
Centre for Food-borne, Environmental and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases
Infectious Disease Prevention and Control Branch
613-948-6883

Health Canada
Deryck Trehearne
A/Director General, Resource Management & Operations Directorate,
Health Products and Food Branch
613-957-6690

Planning Information
Federal organizations Link to departmental Program Alignment Architectures Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from start to end date) 2016–17 Planned spending 2016–17 Expected results (ER) 2016-17 Performance Indicators (PI) 2016–17 Targets (T)
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Food Safety / Animal Health / International Collaboration and Technical Agreements SRM Removal from the Human Food Chain 42,271,478 (2014-15 to 2018-19) 8,454,296 ER 1 PI 1 T 1
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Food Safety / Animal Health / International Collaboration and Technical Agreements Import Controls 3,101,546 (2014-15 to 2018-19) 620,309 ER 2 PI 2a
PI 2b
T 2a
T 2b
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Food Safety / Animal Health / International Collaboration and Technical Agreements BSE Surveillance 76,181,103 (2014-15 to 2018-19) 15,236,220 ER 3 PI 3 T 3
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Food Safety / Animal Health / International Collaboration and Technical Agreements Cattle Identification 9,764,780(2014-15 to 2018-19) 1,952,956 ER 4 PI 4a
PI 4b
PI 4c
PI 4d
T 4a
T 4b
T 4c
T 4d
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Food Safety / Animal Health / International Collaboration and Technical Agreements Export Certification 27,458,176 (2014-15 to 2018-19) 5,491,635 ER 5 PI 5 T 5
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Food Safety / Animal Health / International Collaboration and Technical Agreements Technical Market Access Support 21,404,148 (2014-15 to 2018-19) 4,280,830 ER 6 PI 6 T 6
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Internal Services SRM Removal from the Human Food Chain 3,674,682 (2014-15 to 2018-19) 734,936 Not Applicable Not Applicable Not Applicable
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Internal Services Import Controls 246,269 (2014-15 to 2018-19) 49,254 Not Applicable Not Applicable Not Applicable
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Internal Services BSE Surveillance 4,731,022 (2014-15 to 2018-19) 946,205 Not Applicable Not Applicable Not Applicable
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Internal Services Cattle Identification 907,360 (2014-15 to 2018-19) 181,472 Not Applicable Not Applicable Not Applicable
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Internal Services Export Certification 2,364,684 (2014-15 to 2018-19) 472,937 Not Applicable Not Applicable Not Applicable
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Internal Services Technical Market Access Support 1,390,487 (2014-15 to 2018-19) 278,097 Not Applicable Not Applicable Not Applicable
Health Canada Health Products Risk Assessment 1,538,882 (2014-15 to 2018-19) 301,401 ER 7 PI 7 T 7
Health Canada Food Safety and Nutrition Risk Assessment and standard setting 4,194,844 (2014-15 to 2018-19) 935,827 ER 8 PI 8 T 8
PHAC Public Health Surveillance and Assessment Prion Diseases Program 4,000,000 (2014-15 to 2018-19) 800,000 ER 9 PI 9 T 9
Total for all federal organizations $203,229,461 (from 2014-15 to 2018-19) $40,736,375 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
ER 1: SRM Removal from the Human Food Chain:

Outcome: Safe food

Output: Compliance with current regulations

Activities: Continuation of the enforcement and verification of SRM removal, handling and disposal by CFIA inspection staff

PI 1: Performance Indicator: Industry compliance rate for removal of SRM

T 1: Targets: 100% compliance

ER 2: Import Controls:

Outcome: Products imported into Canada meet Canadian standards

Output: Up-to-date import controls

Activities: Review and update current import policies and conditions for BSE as required, to reflect changes in international standards and evolving science

PI 2a: Performance Indicator: Percentage of import policies verified and updated as required

T 2a: Targets: 25% per year

PI 2b: Performance Indicator: BSE Import Policy is verified and updated as required

T 2b: Targets: Annually, when the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) updates the BSE risk status country lists

ER 3: BSE Surveillance:

Outcome: A sustainable animal resource base, safe food and market access

Output: Measurement of BSE level and distribution in cattle population

Activities:

  • Ongoing collection and analysis of sufficient number of surveillance samples
  • Consultation and communication with stakeholders to ensure their understanding and ongoing active participation in the BSE surveillance program
  • Science-based analysis of the surveillance data

PI 3: Performance Indicator:

  • Surveillance sampling adequate to indicate any trends in BSE cases
    • Temporal trend in exposure to the BSE agent in the cattle population
  • Enhanced commitment by stakeholders to monitor more cattle for BSE

T 3: Targets:

  • Testing 30,000 samples from the high-risk category of cattle is the national target
  • Quarterly meetings with industry leaders
  • Annual report
ER 4: Cattle Identification:

Outcome:

  • Governments and other entities make informed decisions to manage animal and related human health issues
  • Risk to Canadian livestock resource base are mitigated
  • Canadian livestock sector is compliant with regulations

Activities: Data management

Output 1:

  • Privacy impact assessment
  • Threat risk assessment
  • Administrator agreements
  • Data sharing arrangements
  • Data quality strategy
  • List of approved animal indicators

Activities: Compliance verification and support

Output 2:

  • Compliance verification and enforcement strategy
  • Inspection reports
  • Inspector's training course
  • Traceability investigation reports
  • Enforcement actions
  • Communications products
  • Tools for CFIA staff (e.g. manuals, standing operating procedures)

Activities: Program administration

Output 3:

  • Regulations
  • Program and related policies

PI 4a: Performance Indicator: Number and development status of inspection tools in place

T 4a: Targets: Training, tools and materials are relevant and up-to-date

PI 4b: Performance Indicator: Number of inspectors trained

T 4b: Targets: All inspectors verifying compliance are trained

Planning 4a and 4b:

  • Revision of the inspector's training course (I6D287), manual of procedures to reflect new regulatory requirements
  • Inspectors' trainers informed of new regulatory requirements

PI 4c: Performance Indicator: Development status of compliance support products

T 4c: Targets: Products to support regulatory compliance are relevant and up-to-date

Planning 4c:

  • Communications products describing new regulatory requirements to be developed before proposed regulations come into force
  • Information system of the responsible administrator's would be ready to receive regulatory information before proposed regulations come into force
  • List of animal indicators for new species (goat, cervid) subject to traceability requirements would be made available before regulations come into force

PI 4d: Performance Indicator: Percentage of responses to disease and epidemiological investigations that are completed within service standards

T 4d: Targets: 100%.

Planning 4d: an evaluation of the TRACE performance criteria is scheduled to be completed in 2016-17

ER 5: Export Certification:

Outcome: Products exported from Canada meet requirements imposed by foreign countries

Output: Export certification

Activities: Continue provision of export-related certification services to a wide range of affected industries

PI 5: Performance Indicator: Percentage of exports meeting the standards of the importing country as required

T 5: Target: 100%

ER 6: Technical Market Access Support:

Outcome: Maintain or improve confidence in Canada's animal production and food system, facilitating access to domestic and international markets

Output: Increased market demand and confidence

Activities: Continue the establishment and maintenance of strong relationships with trading partners, and the provision of global leadership and influence concerning international policies and standards development

PI 6: Performance Indicator: Trends in market demand for Canadian bovines and beef products; media tracking for consumer confidence in beef in Canada

T 6: Targets: Trends in market demand for Canadian bovines and beef products; media tracking for consumer confidence in beef in Canada

ER 7: Assessing human health risks from Health Products

Immediate Outcome: Increased expertise and knowledge of BSE/TSEs science, risks and product surveillance

PI 7: Performance Indicator: Number and type of training, conferences, symposiums, etc. attended by HC staff on BSE/TSEs topics

  • Number of Health Risk Assessments conducted as a result of BSE suspicion by product line (i.e. biologics)
  • Number of products / product lots assessed for TSEs (or TSEs/BSE risks)

T 7: Targets:

  • 2 courses
  • 0
  • 400 lots per year
ER 8: Food Safety and Nutrition: Risk Assessment:

Immediate Outcome: Increased expertise and knowledge of BSE/TSEs science, risks and product surveillance

PI 8: Performance Indicator: Number and type of training, conferences, symposiums, etc. attended by HC staff on BSE/TSEs topics

  • Number of Health Risk Assessments conducted as a result of BSE suspicion by product line (i.e. food products)
  • Number of knowledge transfer activities related to BSE/TSEs

Intermediate Outcome: Increased knowledge-based decision-making

T 8: Targets:

  • 1 conference
  • 0
  • 2

Data analysis

  • Research papers
  • Laboratory studies
  • Research findings
  • Risk assessments (including recommendations)
  • Incident reports
  • Certificates
  • Internal records
ER 9: Prion Diseases Program

Outcome: Risks of human TSEs in Canada remain clearly defined and well controlled

Output / Activities: Continued, detailed, case-by-case, laboratory-supported investigation of all human TSEs across Canada; improved methods and strategies for case investigation; comprehensive human TSEs surveillance data; laboratory investigations of TSEs diagnostics and biology; research publications; provision of policy advice for food safety, healthcare and international trade

PI 9: Performance Indicator: Alignment of PHAC data from human TSEs surveillance with international benchmarks; number of research presentations and publications; use of policy advice in decision-making

T 9: Targets:

  • Maintenance of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease surveillance sensitivity at a level where observed mortality from all human TSEs in Canada is consistent with that observed internationally (i.e. 1-2 per million population)
  • Technological development to ensure Canadian diagnostic analyses remain consistent with those performed internationally
  • Number of research presentations; and research publications per year
General Information
Name of horizontal initiative Food Safety Oversight (FSO)
Name of lead department(s) Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Federal partner organization(s) Health Canada (HC)
Non-federal and non-governmental partner(s) Not applicable
Start date of the horizontal initiative 2014-15
End date of the horizontal initiative Ongoing
Total federal funding allocated (start to end date) $151,999,631 (2014-15 to 2018-19) and $35,606,377 ongoing (includes CFIA and Health Canada)
Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Description of the horizontal initiative

The objectives of this horizontal initiative are to strengthen the CFIA's and HC's food safety oversight of the fresh fruits and vegetables sector, the fish and seafood sector and the manufactured food products sector. These objectives will be achieved through the implementation of new programming and increased oversight activities.

These objectives are aligned to the Government of Canada Outcome of "Healthy Canadians".

The two federal organizations, the CFIA and HC, received a total spending authority of $152 million over five years and 35.6 million on an ongoing basis for this initiative.

Shared outcome(s) To strengthen Canada's food safety oversight system by implementing a preventive food safety program for fresh fruit and vegetables and providing resources to increase food safety oversight in the fish and seafood and the manufactured food products sectors.
Governance structures

The CFIA and HC currently work horizontally in delivering their shared food safety mandates. This is supported by a memorandum of understanding (MOU), signed in 2008, which provides the foundation for building a clear understanding of their respective roles and responsibilities as they relate to human health and to provide links across the organizations to improve the design and delivery of integrated health-related solutions.

A governance model exists for the partner organizations to regularly convene and discuss food safety issues of mutual concern and responsibility.

This governance framework includes an Assistant Deputy Minister-level and Director General-level Committees on Food Safety that meet regularly to discuss and plan approaches for addressing joint food safety issues. CFIA and HC will continue to work horizontally through these governance committees. As complementary components of the health portfolio, the two organizations will report results within an integrated, collaborative performance measurement framework.

Planning highlights

In 2016-17, the CFIA will continue to phase in the implementation of a preventive food safety program for the fresh fruit and vegetable program that reflects modern approaches to food safety in this sector.

Also, as part of the FSO initiative, the CFIA will be providing functional direction and training to staff and guidance to industry.

In further support of the FSO initiative, there will be additional resources allocated to conduct food safety inspections in the fresh fruit and vegetable, fish and seafood, and manufactured food sectors. These inspections will further enhance food safety practices within the industry. CFIA will also be conducting foreign country assessments in priority areas to enhance the safety of imported food products.

CFIA will continue to increase capacity for sampling, testing and analysis for the non-meat food sector. This will support an increase in both the scope of food/hazard combinations and the level of product and environmental testing performed based on the highest food safety risk. CFIA will continue to broaden and improve testing methods to enhance detection of foodborne pathogens and contaminants. Test results and analysis will continue to inform risk based inspection and sampling activities for the fresh fruit and vegetable, fish and seafood and manufactured food product sectors as identified under FSO.

To support these changes and ensure that resource allocations are as efficient and effective as possible, training of health risk assessors will be conducted by HC and the relative hazards in high-risk non-meat foods will be characterized.

Health Canada will incrementally increase its capacity for standard setting activities that support the new and enhanced CFIA programming in high-risk non-meat foods. HC will initiate work to characterize the relative hazards of targeted pathogens and/or contaminants in high-risk non-meat foods, such as fresh fruit and vegetables, infant formula, human milk fortifiers, contaminants in fish and seafood. Activities to be undertaken include: risk ranking and risk profiling to prioritize analytical method development work, exposure assessments (using up to date food consumption and market share data and other surveillance and monitoring information), as well as, identification and potential implementation of appropriate risk management measures (depending on progress of risk characterization work).

HC will also incrementally increase its capacity for the Health Risk Assessment activities to support the incremental increase in this activity resulting from the new and enhanced CFIA programming activities.

Results to be achieved by non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Contact information

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Dr. Richard Arsenault
Executive Director
Domestic Food Safety Systems & Meat Hygiene Directorate
Policy and Programs Branch
Telephone: 613-773-6156

Dr. Bashir Manji
Executive Director
Food Safety Science Directorate
Science Branch
Telephone: 613-773-6431

Liz Foster
Executive Director
Operation Policy and Systems Directorate
Operations Branch
Telephone: 613-773-5301

Health Canada
Karen McIntyre
Director General
Food Directorate
Health Products and Food Branch
Telephone: 613-957-1821

Planning Information
Federal organizations Link to departmental Program Alignment Architectures Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from start to end date) 2016–17 Planned spending 2016–17 Expected results (ER) 2016–17 Targets (T)
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Food Safety Program Preventive Food Safety Program Management 10,988,214 (2014-15 to 2018-19) and 2,019,203 ongoing 2,233,270 ER 10 T 10
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Food Safety Program Enhanced Inspection Activities 82,937,533 (2014-15 to 2018-19) and 20,822,137 ongoing 23,271,447 ER 11 T 11
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Food Safety Program Increased Sampling, Testing, and Analysis 20,931,033 (2014-15 to 2018-19) and 5,142,720 ongoing 5,609,387 ER 12 T 12a
T 12b
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Food Safety Program Foreign Country Assessments 5,911,834 (2014-15 to 2018-19) and 1,182,367 ongoing 1,182,366 ER 13 T 13
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Internal Services Preventive Food Safety Program Management 798,752 (2014-15 to 2018-19) and 119,624 ongoing 134,116 Not Applicable Not Applicable
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Internal Services Enhanced Inspection Activities 7,871,884 (2014-15 to 2018-19) and 1,367,648 ongoing 2,751,391 Not Applicable Not Applicable
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Internal Services Increased Sampling, Testing, and Analysis 1,352,418 (2014-15 to 2018-19) and 268,621 ongoing 436,890 Not Applicable Not Applicable
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Internal Services Foreign Country Assessments 381,539 (2014-15 to 2018-19) and 62,961 ongoing 62,961 Not Applicable Not Applicable
Health Canada Food Safety and Nutrition Standard Setting 14,246,254 (2014-15 to 2018-19) and 3,080,927 ongoing 3,082,256 ER 14a
ER 14b
ER 14c
ER 14d
T 14a
T 14b
T 14c
T 14d
Health Canada Food Safety and Nutrition Health Risk Assessments 6,580,170 (2014-15 to 2018-19) and 1,540,170 ongoing 1,541,831 ER 15 T 15
Total for all federal organizations $151,999,631 (2014-15 to 2018-19) and $35,606,377 ongoing $40,305,915 Not applicable Not applicable
Expected Results and Targets
ER 10: Expected Results: Preventive Food Safety Program Management

Strengthened design and management of Preventive Food Safety Programing

T 10: Targets: List of events and materials to support program delivery

ER 11: Expected Result: Enhanced Inspection Activities

Increased Inspection activities in the non-meat food areas

T 11: Targets: Number of inspections conducted in the non-meat food area

ER 12: Expected Result: Enhanced Sampling, Testing, and Analysis

Increased Sampling, Testing, and Analysis

T 12a: Targets: Sample testing reports, results and analysis completed in the non-meat food areas

T 12b: Targets: Validated methods developed and implemented to support increased testing in the non-meat food areas

ER 13: Expected Result: Foreign Country Assessments

Increased Foreign Country Assessments of priority areas

T 13: Targets: Establish baseline of foreign country assessments and show increase of foreign country assessments

ER 14a: Expected Result: Standard Setting

Development of new and/or updated standards is initiated in 100% of cases where there is an identified need to do so in order to address food safety risks

T 14a: Targets: 100% of cases where there is an identified need to do so in order to address food safety risks

ER 14b: Expected Result: Standard Setting: Number and type of involvement activities associated with standard setting initiatives

T 14b: Targets: TBD since it will depend on the number and type of standards being developed

ER 14c: Expected Result: Standard Setting

Number of risk assessments developed in support of standard setting initiatives

T 14c: Targets: TBD since it will depend on the number and type of standards being developed

ER 14d: Expected Result: Standard Setting

Number of detection methods developed and enhanced in support of standard setting initiatives

T 14d: Targets: TBD since it will depend on the number and type of standards being developed

ER 15: Expected Result: Health Risk Assessments

Timely response to emerging food and nutrition safety incidents including foodborne illness outbreaks

T 15: Targets: 90% of health risk assessment provided to CFIA within standard timelines to manage food safety incidents

General Information
Name of horizontal initiative Canadian Food Safety Information Network (CFSIN)
Name of lead department(s) Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)
Federal partner organization(s) Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), the Public Health Agency of Canada (Public Health Agency), and Health Canada (HC)
Non-federal and non-governmental partner(s) Not applicable
Start date of the horizontal initiative 2014-15
End date of the horizontal initiative 2018-19
Total federal funding allocated (start to end date) $15,606,877
Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Description of the horizontal initiative The Canadian Food Safety Information Network leverages the Public Health Agency of Canada's web-based informatics platform to strengthen the ability of Canada's federal, provincial and territorial (FPT) food safety authorities to share data to anticipate, detect and respond to foodborne hazards and minimize the impact of food safety events. The CFSIN will link FPT food safety authorities and food testing laboratories across Canada.
Shared outcome(s)
  • Integrated and strengthened national laboratory capacity to respond to food safety incidents and emergencies;
  • Enhanced coordinated, preventive and risk-based approach to food safety oversight;
  • An automated early warning system for food safety authorities;
  • A pan-Canadian approach to food safety surveillance to better demonstrate system effectiveness to trading partners; and
  • Effectively positioning FPT partners for eventual movement toward a full Network of Networks.
Governance structures

The CFIA's Vice President, Science, is the Executive Sponsor for the implementation of the CFSIN.

A CFSIN FPT Steering Committee has been established to provide integrated FPT leadership, input and guidance for the development and implementation of the CFSIN program component and associated food safety activities.

The Executive Sponsor chairs an interdepartmental Special Project Advisory Committee (SPAC) to provide oversight and guidance for the project component (IM/IT enablement) for the CFSIN initiative. For horizontality and transparency, a provincial member of the CFSIN FPT Steering Committee also participates.

The Senior Management Committee (SMC), chaired by the CFIA President, provides direction for the initiative and is accountable for overall implementation of the CFSIN.

The CFIA, HC, and the Public Health Agency of Canada work horizontally in delivering their shared food safety mandates and meet regularly to discuss food safety issues of mutual concerns. Additionally, regularly scheduled, targeted discussions regarding the implementation of the CFSIN occur.

Planning highlights

Data support, coordination, environmental scanning, and outreach activities to implement the network among FPT food safety authorities and food safety laboratories. This includes:

  • collaboration with partners to develop data and information-sharing arrangements;
  • developing a common data dictionary for food safety; and
  • identifying the key food safety data elements that will be shared for data aggregation and analysis.

Further advancing the activities conducted in 2015-16, the CFIA will, in partnership with the Public Health Agency of Canada, HC and provinces and territories, continue to build the collaborative network and plan the technical infrastructure required to share food safety data. The CFSIN will leverage the Public Health Agency of Canada's existing web-based informatics platform, the Canadian Network for Public Health Intelligence (CNPHI), to support data and information sharing and collaboration among FPT food safety authorities and food testing laboratories. The CFIA will also integrate multiple data repositories to ensure that complete, robust data sets are available for trending and analysis.

In 2016-17, project definition work will be undertaken to support the program in seeking Treasury Board approval for the next phase of the CFSIN. This includes detailed business requirements, solution specifications, concept of operations, etc.

The CFSIN initiative performance highlights are:

  • Governance structures have been put in place;
  • Staffing of resources are on-going;
  • A FPT data dictionary working group has been established and meetings to define data elements are on-going; and
  • Engagement with provincial partners has begun with respect to data sharing arrangements.
Results to be achieved by non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Contact information

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Bashir Manji
Executive Director, Food Safety Science Directorate
Telephone: 613-773-6431

Health Canada
Karen McIntyre
Director General
Food Directorate
Health Products and Food Branch
Telephone: 613-957-1821

Public Health Agency of Canada
Michael Stollman,
Director, IMPS
Telephone: 613-219-0305

Planning Information
Federal organizations Link to departmental Program Alignment Architectures Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (2014-15 to 2018-19) 2016–17 Planned spending 2016–17 Expected results (ER) 2016-17 Targets (T)
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Food Safety Program Data Support, Coordination and Outreach 9,330,455 2,091,999 ER 16 T 16
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Food Safety Program Environmental Scanning 990,306 235,227 ER 17 T 17
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Food Safety Program Enhanced IM/IT architecture 2,945,388 0 Not Applicable Not Applicable
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Internal Services Data Support, Coordination and Outreach 571,532 124,640 Not Applicable Not Applicable
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Internal Services Environmental Scanning 70,059 15,911 Not Applicable Not Applicable
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Internal Services Enhanced IM/IT architecture 159,501 0 Not Applicable Not Applicable
Public Health Agency of Canada Public Health Infrastructure Program Development of new Food Safety module on CNPHI platform 368,839 Funding for 2016-17 has not yet received Treasury Board approval Funding for 2016-17 has not yet received Treasury Board approval Funding for 2016-17 has not yet received Treasury Board approval
Health Canada Data Support, Coordination and Outreach 1,170,797 263,423 ER 20 T 20
Total for all federal organizations $15,606,877 $2,731,200 Not applicable Not applicable
ER 16: Data Support, Coordination and Outreach

Outcome: Horizontal integration, collaboration, and coordination among food safety authorities.

Output / Activities: The CFIA will continue outreach activities with FPT partners and formalize participation in the CFSIN through bilateral data sharing arrangements. The CFIA will also expand outreach and engagement with industry to discuss sharing their food safety data. Additionally, engagement with CFSIN partnered laboratories will be ongoing and will include activities associated with laboratory quality management and accreditation. The CFIA, with its partners, will continue the development of a common food safety data dictionary, identify the data elements to be shared, and begin the development of a common food classification system.

T 16: Targets: Multiple data sharing arrangements with the provincial and territorial partners will be signed in 2016-17. Finalize the data dictionary and prepare a draft food classification system to support data sharing and integration activities with CFSIN FPT partners.

ER 17: Environmental Scanning

Outcome: Preventive and risk-based approaches to food safety oversight are informed by incidents, trends, and emerging issues.

Output / Activities: Working with FPT partners to advance a more collaborative and systematic approach to identifying new and emerging threats to the food supply, tracking new scientific findings or social concerns, and monitoring domestic and international trends in food safety to improve food safety programs. Continue the development for a systematic pan-Canadian approach to searching and cataloguing intelligence and information.

T 17: Targets: Finalized inventory of environmental scanning and intelligence resources (i.e., incidents, trends, and emerging issues) among federal partners.

ER 20: Data Support, Coordination and Outreach

Outcome: Improved ability of government agencies and the industry to anticipate, prepare, and efficiently respond to food safety issues and emergencies.

Output / Activities: Coordination and outreach support that primarily supports CFSIN and expanded use of CANLINE within Health Canada food science laboratories.

Performance Measures: Outreach and training sessions held with Health Canada Food Directorate's research and regulatory community; Food laboratory research results uploaded to CANLINE.

T 20: Targets

  • 3 Outreach training sessions are held;
  • 15 food laboratory research results uploaded to CANLINE
General Information
Name of horizontal initiative Renewal of Government Response and Action Plan to the 2008 Listeriosis Outbreak
Name of lead department(s) Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)
Federal partner organization(s) Health Canada (HC); and the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)
Non-federal and non-governmental partner(s) Not Applicable
Start date of the horizontal initiative 2012-13
End date of the horizontal initiative 2015-16 (CFIA); 2016-17 and ongoing (HC and PHAC)
Total federal funding allocated (start to end date) $112,900,000 (2012-13 to 2016-17) and $10,500,000 ongoing (HC and PHAC).
Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners Not Applicable
Description of the horizontal initiative

The objective of this horizontal initiative is to continue to enhance the Government of Canada's ability to prevent, detect and respond to outbreaks of foodborne illnesses, pursuant to recommendations stemming from reviews of the 2008 listeriosis outbreak.

The three federal organizations, the CFIA, HC, and PHAC, received a total spending authority of $112.9 million for this initiative (CFIA: $60.4 million over four years, PHAC: $33 million over five years, and HC: $19.5 million over five years). PHAC and HC also received a total spending authority of $10.5 million ongoing ($6.6 million and $3.9 million respectively). Each federal organization identified the resource requirements, strategic outcomes, objectives, and implementation plan for each program area.

Shared outcome(s)

Address Immediate Food Safety Risks by maintaining:

  • hired ready-to-eat meat inspection staff;
  • scientific and technical training programs for inspection staff;
  • technical support to continue enhanced connectivity for inspectors;
  • enhanced food safety program risk management; and
  • capacity for the increasing number and complexity of health risk assessments.

Enhanced Surveillance and Early Detection by maintaining:

  • capacity to improve and validate test detection methods for Listeria;
  • scientific capacity to continue additional Listeria testing;
  • ability to develop and improve test detection methods for Listeria and other foodborne hazards;
  • national public health surveillance tools and platforms through the expansion of the FoodNet Canada (formerly C-EnterNet) Program; and
  • strengthened laboratory diagnostic and networking tools: continued implementation of whole genome sequencing; continued expansion of PulseNet Canada.

Improved Government Response to Foodborne Illness Outbreaks in Canada by maintaining:

  • support to the Food Safety Portal;
  • risk communication and social marketing strategies;
  • human illness outbreak response capacity; and
  • national epidemiological surge public health outbreak capacity.
Governance structures The CFIA, HC and PHAC currently work horizontally in delivering their shared food safety mandates. Pursuant to existing trilateral memoranda of understanding, the three partners meet regularly to discuss food safety issues of mutual concern. This governance framework includes Deputy Head, Assistant Deputy Minister, and Director General level committees, which meet regularly to discuss and plan approaches for addressing joint food safety issues. The work of the committees is also informed by the F/P/T Ministers of Health and Agriculture and their associated discussions on food safety.
Planning highlights

The CFIA, HC and PHAC continue to deliver core food safety activities stemming from the Government Response and Action Plan to the 2008 Listeriosis Outbreak. Performance highlights for 2015-16 include the following:

  • meat processing training was delivered to 469 inspectors;
  • approximately 850 inspectors now have high speed aircard access;
  • a model system for industry's control of Listeria was developed as part of the CFIA's guidance documents;
  • a new culture method for the identification of Listeria from environmental samples taken from food processing equipment was developed and validated;
  • approximately 1000 environmental samples were taken in meat processing establishments;
  • approximately 1000 food recalls and allergy alerts were published through Facebook and Twitter;
  • a new FoodNet Canada sentinel site was implemented in Ontario;
  • 1000 priority pathogen isolates were genetically sequenced;
  • next generation of laboratory fingerprinting for Campylobacter using comparative genomic fingerprinting was rolled out at three FoodNet Canada sentinel sites;
  • 100 percent of health risk assessments were delivered within time standards;
  • significant advancements were achieved in the development and validation of analytical methods for the detection of Listeria and other hazards in foods; and
  • roll out of a targeted advertising campaign to pregnant women and parents of children aged 5 and under.
Results to be achieved by non-federal and non-governmental partners Not Applicable
Contact information

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Veronica McGuire
Acting Executive Director
Strategic Policy and International Affairs Directorate
613-773-5867

Health Canada
Deryck Trehearne
Director General, Resource Management & Operations Directorate,
Health Products and Food Branch,
613-957-6690

Public Health Agency of Canada
Steven Sternthal
Director General
Centre for Food-borne, Environmental and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases
Infectious Disease Prevention and Control Branch
613-948-6883

Planning Information
Federal organizations Link to departmental Program Alignment Architectures Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from start to end date) 2016–17 Planned spending 2016–17 Expected results (ER) 2016–17 Targets (T)
Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Food Safety Program

Internal Services

Maintaining hired inspection staff in ready-to-eat meat establishments 29,104,000 (2012-13 to 2015-16) The funding for CFIA sunset in 2015-16 The funding for CFIA sunset in 2015-16 The funding for CFIA sunset in 2015-16
Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Food Safety Program

Internal Services

Maintaining scientific and technical training programs 14,336,000 (2012-13 to 2015-16) The funding for CFIA sunset in 2015-16 The funding for CFIA sunset in 2015-16 The funding for CFIA sunset in 2015-16
Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Food Safety Program

Internal Services

Maintaining enhanced connectivity for inspectors 2,280,000 (2012-13 to 2015-16) The funding for CFIA sunset in 2015-16 The funding for CFIA sunset in 2015-16 The funding for CFIA sunset in 2015-16
Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Food Safety Program

Internal Services

Maintaining enhanced food safety program risk management 6,680,000 (2012-13 to 2015-16) The funding for CFIA sunset in 2015-16 The funding for CFIA sunset in 2015-16 The funding for CFIA sunset in 2015-16
Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Food Safety Program

Internal Services

Maintaining capacity to improve test detection methods for Listeria and other foodborne hazards 1,960,000 (2012-13 to 2015-16) The funding for CFIA sunset in 2015-16 The funding for CFIA sunset in 2015-16 The funding for CFIA sunset in 2015-16
Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Food Safety Program

Internal Services

Maintaining scientific capacity to continue Listeria testing 5,360,000 (2012-13 to 2015-16) The funding for CFIA sunset in 2015-16 The funding for CFIA sunset in 2015-16 The funding for CFIA sunset in 2015-16
Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Food Safety Program

Internal Services

Maintaining support to the Government of Canada Food Safety Portal 680,000 (2012-13 to 2015-16) The funding for CFIA sunset in 2015-16 The funding for CFIA sunset in 2015-16 The funding for CFIA sunset in 2015-16
Health Canada Food Safety and Nutrition Maintain ability to respond within established service standards to the increasing number and complexity of health risk assessments and food safety investigations 13,500,000 (2012-13 to 2016-17) and 2,700,000 ongoing 2,708,404 ER 21 T 21
Health Canada Food Safety and Nutrition Maintaining ability to develop and improve test detection methods for Listeria and other foodborne hazards 3,000,000 (2012-13 to 2016-17) and 600,000 ongoing 591,596 ER 22 T 22
Health Canada Food Safety and Nutrition Maintaining a Social Marketing Strategy 3,000,000 (2012-13 to 2016-17) and 600,000 ongoing 600,000 ER 23 T 23
PHAC Health Promotion and Disease Prevention; Public Health Infrastructure Maintain national public health surveillance tools and platforms through the expansion of the FoodNet Canada program 7,929,923 (2012-13 to 2016-17) and 1,585,679 ongoing 1,585,769 ER 24 T 24
PHAC Public Health Infrastructure Maintain strengthened laboratory diagnostic and networking tools: Continued implementation of whole genome sequencing 4,471,260 (2012-13 to 2016-17) and 894,252 ongoing 894,252 ER 25 T 25
Public Health Infrastructure Maintain strengthened laboratory diagnostic and networking tools: Continued expansion of PulseNet Canada 1,852,105 (2012-13 to 2016-17) and 370,421 ongoing 370,421 ER 26 T 26
Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Maintain human illness outbreak response capacity 14,525,824 (2012-13 to 2016-17) and 2,908,774 ongoing 2,908,774 ER 27 T 27
Health Promotion and Disease Prevention; Health Security; Public Health Infrastructure Maintain national epidemiological surge public health outbreak capacity 4,220,888 (2012-13 to 2016-17) and 840,874 ongoing 840,874 ER 28 T 28
Total for all federal organizations $112,900,000(2012-13 to 2016-17) and $10,500,000 ongoing (HC and PHAC) $10,500,090 Not applicable Not applicable
ER 21: Maintaining ability to respond within established service standards to the increasing number and complexity of health risk assessments and food safety investigations:

Outcome: Improved management of food safety risks

Output / Activities: Provide risk assessments, based on the best available science and methods, within established service standards and strengthen the prevention of and response to food safety incidents

T 21: Targets:

  • Maintenance of FTEs to support HRA activities.
  • Number of HRAs completed within service standards.
  • Number of quality management practices implemented, including SOPs, templates, and inter-departmental HC-CFIA protocols.
  • National and international collaborations conducted related to risk modelling method development, refinement, testing, validation, and implementation.
ER 22: Maintaining ability to develop and improve test detection methods for Listeria and other foodborne hazards:

Outcome: Improve test detection methods for Listeria and other foodborne hazards

Output / Activities: Have a suite of rapid validated tools available to industry and government partners to allow action to be taken at the earliest opportunity, thereby reducing exposure of Canadians to foodborne hazards

T 22: Targets:

  • Risk assessment modelling methods and IT tools that are current, accepted, validated, and meet international standards.
  • Number of improved test detection methods and other laboratory diagnostic tools developed for faster detection of Listeria and other hazards in foods.
  • Number of validated methods published.
  • Establishment of service standards and protocols for publishing methods according to the Microbiological Methods Committee (MMC) and Chemical Methods Committee (RCMC).
  • Establishment and description of criteria and processes to identify priority methods for validation by HC and CFIA according to the MMC and RCMC.
  • Number of completed pilots and validated methodologies/prototypes for the detection of Listeria and other hazards in foods.
ER 23: Maintaining a Social Marketing Strategy:

Outcome: Canadians are aware of and contribute to the management of food safety risks

Output / Activities: Continue to increase awareness and knowledge of the health risks associated with unsafe food handling practices and foodborne illness among vulnerable populations through the use of multi-faceted activities

T 23: Targets:

  • Broaden strategic partnerships to extend reach of messaging.
  • Deliver the ongoing food safety marketing campaign to increase reach through educational and promotional activities.
  • Increase traffic to relevant web content.
ER 24: Maintaining national public health surveillance tools and platforms through the expansion of the FoodNet Canada program:

Outcome: Enhanced foodborne disease surveillance

Output / Activities: Improved surveillance tools of FoodNet Canada (formerly C-Internet)

T 24: Targets: Explore and develop options to expand FoodNet Canada to at least two additional sites.

ER 25: Maintaining strengthened laboratory diagnostic and networking tools: Continued implementation of whole genome sequencing:

Outcome: Canada's ability to rapidly detect potential outbreaks and trace their origins is enhanced

Output / Activities: Modern genomic technologies will continue to be implemented to provide substantially more detailed information and evidence on foodborne pathogens during outbreak investigations. This will be done according to the roadmap that has been developed for the implementation of genomic epidemiology in PulseNet Canada

T 25: Targets: Progress in the completion of PulseNet Canada Genome roadmap implementation, including decentralization of sequencing and bioinformatics analysis, interpretation criteria development, implementing and the validation of validating and implementing whole genome sequenced based serotyping of human cases of Salmonella and E. coli. The completion of sequencing 1000 retrospective priority pathogen isolates and a pilot project for time-delayed prospective sequencing of all Listeria isolates for one year.

ER 26: Maintaining strengthened laboratory diagnostic and networking tools: Continued expansion of PulseNet Canada:

Outcome: Canada's ability to rapidly detect and trace the origins of food hazards is enhanced

Output / Activities: The expansion of the PulseNet Canada laboratory network will increase outbreak detection capacity and information sharing amongst F/P/T partner laboratories

T 26: Targets: Network expansion now exclusively refers to the transition to include whole genome sequencing as a primary subtyping method. Targets include the number of PulseNet Canada partner laboratories performing sequencing, participating in testing training and proficiency programs; number of technicians within PulseNet Canada partner laboratories that successfully completed testing proficiency programs; development of new training and knowledge translation materials to support the expansion of the network to include on-line training as well as genomic epidemiology and publishing.

ER 27: Maintaining human illness outbreak response capacity:

Outcome: Enhanced effectiveness and efficiency of response activities, as well as improved coordination and capacity to respond to multi-jurisdictional foodborne illness outbreaks

Output / Activities: The development and maintenance of tools for multi-jurisdictional outbreak response, as well as maintenance of protocols to ensure awareness of processes, roles and responsibilities of F/P/T partners

T 27: Targets: Completion of identified revisions to the Food-borne Illness Outbreak Response Protocol (FIORP); Percentage of planned Foodborne Illness Outbreak Response Protocol exercises completed

ER 28: Maintaining national epidemiological surge public health outbreak capacity:

Outcome: Improved coordination and capacity to control and mitigate an outbreak which poses a public health threat to Canadians

Output / Activities: Efficient and effective federal surge capacity to support outbreak response and mitigate the public health impact of a foodborne illness outbreak

T 28: Targets:

  • Implement competency-based management initiatives to build response capacity;
  • Expand All Events Response Operations (AERO) to capture additional skills and expertise to support outbreak response;
  • Competency-based training support documentation reviewed;
  • Continue to develop and implement plan for maintaining Agency surge capacity which includes: recruitment strategy, training strategy (including annual training for new and existing surge staff), and agreed-to competencies;
  • Continue to mobilize subject matter experts in the event of food safety outbreaks in Canada.
  • Build on the protocols and procedures developed to further integrate mobilization aspects into the existing federal plans and protocols related to foodborne illness.
  • Protocols and processes are approved;
  • List of staff for surge reviewed and updated;
  • Number of FTEs and/or budget allocated to train and develop Agency staff; and
  • Number of Directorates participating in the surge All Events Response Operations (AERO) database

Upcoming Internal Audits and Evaluations over the Next Three Fiscal Years

A. Internal audits
Title of Internal Audit Internal Audit Type Status Expected Completion Date
Audit of Staffing Internal Services In Progress March 2016
Audit of Major IT Application (SAP) Internal Services In Progress March 2016
Audit of Work Planning Cycle for Inspection Activities Program Planned March 2017
Audit of Issuance and Administration of Licenses to Regulated Parties (Renamed to Audit of Centres of Administration) Program PlannedTable Note 10 2016/2017
Audit of CFIA Complaints Process Program PlannedTable Note 10 2016/2017
Joint Audit of IM/IT Disaster Recovery (CFIA/AAFC) Internal Services PlannedTable Note 10 2017/2018
Audit of Recordkeeping Internal Services PlannedTable Note 10 2017/2018
Audit of Emergency Management Program PlannedTable Note 10 2017/2018
Audit of Inspection Verification Function Program PlannedTable Note 10 2017/2018

Table Notes

Table note 10

Audits identified as "Planned" may be subject to change due to shifting of priorities based on annual evaluation of risk elements. The new proposed audit projects for fiscal years 2016-2017 to 2018-2019 will be approved in 2016.

Return to table note 10 referrer

Electronic Link to Internal Audit Plan (if publicly available):

CFIA audit reports can be found at: Audits, Reviews and Evaluations

B. EvaluationsTable Note 11 – 2016/2017 to 2018/2019
Link to Departmental Program Alignment Architecture Title of the Evaluation Planned Evaluation Start Date Planned Deputy Head Approval Date
Food Safety Program (1.1) Food Safety Program – Part 1 Table Note 12 December 2014 June 2016
Food Safety Program (1.1): Meat and Poultry (1.1.1) Meat and Poultry April 2014 December 2016
Animal Health and Zoonotics Program (1.2): Terrestrial Animal Health (1.2.1), National Aquatic Animal Health (1.2.2). Animal Health Program January 2016 March 2018
Food Safety Program (1.1) Food Safety Program – Part 2Table Note 13 April 2016 June 2018
Animal Health and Zoonotics Program (1.2): Feed (1.2.3); Plant Resources Program (1.3): Seed (1.3.2), Fertilizer (1.3.3), Intellectual Property Rights (1.3.4) Pre-Market ProgrammingTable Note 14 July 2017 July 2019
Plant Resources Program (1.3): Plant Protection (1.3.1) Plant Program April 2018 March 2020

Table Notes

Table Note 11

As per the approved 2015 CFIA Evaluation Plan. Planned evaluations may be subject to change due to shifting of priorities based on an annual update of the Evaluation Plan. The new proposed evaluation projects for fiscal years 2016-2017 to 2020-2021 will be approved in 2016.

Return to table note 11 referrer

Table Note 12

Including Food Safety Modernization Initiative (FSMI) and Electronic Service Delivery Platform (ESDP).

Return to table note 12 referrer

Table Note 13

Including FSMI, ESDP, Food Safety Oversight and Canadian Food Safety Information Network (CFSIN).

Return to table note 13 referrer

Table Note 14

Including Feed Program, Seed Program, Intellectual Property Rights and Fertilizer.

Return to table note 14 referrer

Electronic link to evaluation plan (if available on the departmental Website):

CFIA evaluation reports can be found at: Audits, Reviews and Evaluations

User Fees and Regulatory Charges

General Information
Name of User Fee (New or Amended): Fees for services provided under the Safe Food for Canadians Act (new and amended fees)
Fee Type: Regulatory and Other Products and Services
Fee-setting Authority: Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act
Reason for Planned Introduction of or Amendment to a Fee:

New fees to be introduced to replace current fees identified in the CFIA Fees Notice:

  • Part 1 –Dairy Products Fees
  • Part 2 – Egg Fees
  • Part 3 – Processed Egg Fees
  • Part 6 – Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Fees (excluding fees for Destination Inspection Services)
  • Part 7 – Honey Fees
  • Part 8 – Livestock and Poultry Carcass Grading Fees
  • Part 9 – Maple Product Fees
  • Part 10 – Meat Products Inspection Fees
  • Part 13 – Processed Products Fees
  • Part 16 – Fish Inspection Fees
Effective Date of Planned Change of existing fee or introduction of new fee: 2017
Consultation and Review Process Planned: Consultation in 2016
Name of User Fee (New or Amended): Fees for services provided in the feed program (amended)
Fee Type: Regulatory and Other Products and Services
Fee-setting Authority: Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act
Reason for Planned Introduction of or Amendment to a Fee:

Amendment of fees to replace current fees identified in the CFIA Fees Notice:

  • Part 4 – Feeds Fees
Effective Date of Planned Change of existing fee or introduction of new fee: 2017
Consultation and Review Process Planned: Consultation 2016
Name of User Fee (New or Amended): Fees for services provided in fertilizer program (amended)
Fee Type: Regulatory and Other Products and Services
Fee-setting Authority: Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act
Reason for Planned Introduction of or Amendment to a Fee:

Amendment of fees to replace current fees identified in the CFIA Fees Notice

  • Part 5 – Fertilizer Fees
Effective Date of Planned Change of existing fee or introduction of new fee: 2017
Consultation and Review Process Planned: Consultation 2016
Name of User Fee (New or Amended): Fees for services related to animal health program (amended)
Fee Type: Regulatory and other products and services.
Fee-setting Authority: Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act
Reason for Planned Introduction of or Amendment to a Fee:

Amendment of fees to replace current fees identified in the CFIA Fees Notice:

  • Part 11 – Health of Animals Fees
Effective Date of Planned Change of existing fee or introduction of new fee: 2017
Consultation and Review Process Planned: Consultation 2016
Name of User Fee (New or Amended): Fees for services related to the plant health program (amended)
Fee Type: Regulatory and other products and services.
Fee-setting Authority: Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act
Reason for Planned Introduction of or Amendment to a Fee: Amendment of fees to replace current fees identified in the CFIA Fees Notice:
  • Part 12 – Plant Protection Fees
  • Part 14 – Seeds Fees
  • Part 15 – Seed Potato Fees
Effective Date of Planned Change of existing fee or introduction of new fee: 2017
Consultation and Review Process Planned: Consultation 2016

Tax Expenditures and Evaluations

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in the Tax Expenditures and EvaluationsEndnote xxii publication. The tax measures presented in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Section IV: Organizational Contact Information

Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)
1400 Merivale Road,
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0Y9
Canada
Telephone: 800-442-2342 / 613-773-2342

Internet: Contact Us

Appendix: Definitions

Appropriation
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
Departmental Performance Report
Reports on an appropriated organization's actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Reports on Plans and Priorities. These reports are tabled in Parliament in the fall.
full time equivalent
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person year charge against a departmental budget. Full time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
Government of Canada outcomes
A set of 16 high level objectives defined for the government as a whole, grouped in four spending areas: economic affairs, social affairs, international affairs and government affairs.
Management, Resources and Results Structure
A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization's inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.
non budgetary expenditures
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
performance reporting
The process of communicating evidence based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.
planned spending
For Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) and Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs), planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.
A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their RPPs and DPRs.
plans
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
priorities
Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).
program
A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.
Program Alignment Architecture
A structured inventory of an organization's programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.
Report on Plans and Priorities
Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated organizations over a three year period. These reports are tabled in Parliament each spring.
results
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization's influence.
statutory expenditures
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
Strategic Outcome
A long term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization's mandate, vision and core functions.
sunset program
A time limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.
target
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
voted expenditures
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.
whole of government framework
Maps the financial contributions of federal organizations receiving appropriations by aligning their Programs to a set of 16 government wide, high level outcome areas, grouped under four spending areas.

Appendix: Performance Measurement Framework Methodologies

Strategic Outcome

MRRS Level MRRS Id Program Name Type Selection Strategic Outcome / Expected Result Outcome / Performance Indicator Data Source Methodology
SO 1 All Programs Strategic Outcome A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base

Program 1.1 - Food Safety Program

MRRS Level MRRS Id Program Name Type Selection Strategic Outcome / Expected Result Outcome / Performance Indicator Data Source Methodology
P 1.1.1 Food Safety Expected Result Risks to the Canadian public associated with the food supply system are mitigated Number of commodity areas where inspected federally-registered establishments meet established compliance targets Agri-food, Meat and Seafood Safety Directorate (Electronic & Manual sources) Count of Commodity Areas that met compliance targets for inspection of federally-registered establishments
P 1.1.2 Food Safety Expected Result Risks to the Canadian public associated with the food supply system are mitigated Percentage of Public Warnings for Class I food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decision Office of Food Safety and Recall (Electronic & manual sources) [(Total Class I Recalls with Public Warning - Total Greater than 24 hours) / Total Class I Recalls with Public Warning] X 100
P 1.1.3 Food Safety Expected Result Risks to the Canadian public associated with the food supply system are mitigated Percentage of Public Warnings for Class II food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decision Office of Food Safety and Recall (Electronic & manual sources) [(Total Class 2 Recalls with Public Warning - Total Greater than 24 hours) / Total Class 2 Recalls with Public Warning] X 100
P 1.1.4 Food Safety Expected Result Domestic and imported food products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Number of commodity areas where tested domestic food products meet established compliance targets Food Safety Division (Electronic & manual sources) Count of Commodity Areas that met compliance targets for tested domestic foods
P 1.1.5 Food Safety Expected Result Domestic and imported food products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Number of commodity areas where tested imported food products meet established compliance targets. Food Safety Division (Electronic & manual sources) Count of Commodity Areas that met compliance targets for tested imported foods
Sub - Program 1.1.1 - Meat and Poultry
MRRS Level MRRS Id Program Name Type Selection Strategic Outcome / Expected Result Outcome / Performance Indicator Data Source Methodology
SP 1.1.1.1 Meat and Poultry Expected Result Federally registered meat and poultry establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered meat and poultry establishments in compliance with federal regulations Meat Inspection Data (Cognos) [(Total #Establishments Inspected - Total #Establishments that received Enforcement letter) / Total #Establishments Inspected] X 100
SP 1.1.1.2 Meat and Poultry Expected Result Meat and poultry products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic meat and poultry products in compliance with federal regulations Meat Inspection Data (Cognos) [(Total #Domestic Samples tested - Total #Unsatisfactory Domestic samples tested) / Total #Domestic Samples tested] X 100
SP 1.1.1.3 Meat and Poultry Expected Result Meat and poultry products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested imported meat and poultry products in compliance with federal regulations Meat Inspection Data (Cognos) [(Total #Imported Samples tested - Total #Unsatisfactory Imported samples tested) / Total #Imported Samples tested] X 100
Sub - Program 1.1.2 - Egg
MRRS Level MRRS Id Program Name Type Selection Strategic Outcome / Expected Result Outcome / Performance Indicator Data Source Methodology
SP 1.2.1 Egg Expected Result Federally registered shell egg establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered shell egg establishments in compliance with federal regulations Egg Inspection Data (Manual sources) [(Total #Establishments Inspected - Total #Warning Letters/Suspensions/Cancellations) / Total #Establishments Inspected] X 100
SP 1.2.2 Egg Expected Result Shell egg and egg products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic shell egg and egg products in compliance with federal regulations Egg Inspection Data (Cognos) [(Total #Domestic Samples tested - Total #Unsatisfactory Domestic samples tested) / Total #Domestic Samples tested] X 100
SP 1.2.3 Egg Expected Result Shell egg and egg products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested imported shell egg and egg products in compliance with federal regulations Egg Inspection Data (Cognos) [(Total #Imported Samples tested - Total #Unsatisfactory Imported samples tested) / Total #Imported Samples tested] X 100
Sub - Program 1.1.3 - Dairy
MRRS Level MRRS Id Program Name Type Selection Strategic Outcome / Expected Result Outcome / Performance Indicator Data Source Methodology
SP 1.1.3.1 Dairy Expected Result Federally registered dairy establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered dairy establishments in compliance with federal regulations Dairy Inspection Data (Manual sources) [(Total # establishments inspected – Total #warning letters/suspensions/cancellations*) / Total #establishments inspected] X 100
*Total # warning letters/suspensions/cancellations: Total # of enforcement actions (warning letters are only counted for infractions related to establishments that are NOT in compliance with regulations)
SP 1.1.3.2 Dairy Expected Result Dairy products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic dairy products in compliance with federal regulations Dairy Inspection Data (Cognos) [(Total #Domestic Samples tested - Total #Unsatisfactory Domestic samples tested) / Total #Domestic Samples tested] X 100
SP 1.1.3.3 Dairy Expected Result Dairy products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested imported dairy products in compliance with federal regulations Dairy Inspection Data (Cognos) [(Total #Imported Samples tested - Total #Unsatisfactory Imported samples tested) / Total #Imported Samples tested] X 100
Sub - Program 1.1.4 - Fish and Seafood
MRRS Level MRRS Id Program Name Type Selection Strategic Outcome / Expected Result Outcome / Performance Indicator Data Source Methodology
SP 1.1.4.1 Fish and Seafood Expected Result Federally registered fish and seafood establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered fish and seafood establishments in compliance with federal regulations Fish, Seafood Inspection Data (Cognos) [(Total #Establishments Audited - Total #establishments with one or more closed unacceptable audits) / Total #Establishments Audited] X 100
SP 1.1.4.2 Fish and Seafood Expected Result Fish and seafood products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic fish and seafood products in compliance with federal regulations Fish, Seafood Inspection Data (Cognos) [(Total #Domestic Samples tested - Total #Unsatisfactory Domestic samples tested) / Total #Domestic Samples tested] X 100
SP 1.1.4.3 Fish and Seafood Expected Result Fish and seafood products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested imported fish and seafood products in compliance with federal regulations Fish, Seafood Inspection Data (Cognos) [(Total #Random Import Inspections- Total #Failed random Import inspections) / Total #Random Import Inspections] X 100
Sub - Program 1.1.5 - Fresh Fruits and Vegetables
MRRS Level MRRS Id Program Name Type Selection Strategic Outcome / Expected Result Outcome / Performance Indicator Data Source Methodology
SP 1.1.5.1 Fresh Fruits and Vegetables Expected Result Federally registered fresh fruits and vegetables establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered fresh fruit and vegetable establishments in compliance with federal regulations Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Inspection Data (Manual sources) [(Total # establishments inspected – Total #warning letters/suspensions/cancellations*) / Total #establishments inspected] X 100
*Total # warning letters/suspensions/cancellations: Total # of enforcement actions (warning letters are only counted for infractions related to establishments that are NOT in compliance with regulations)
SP 1.1.5.2 Fresh Fruits and Vegetables Expected Result Fresh fruit and vegetable products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic fresh fruit and vegetable samples in compliance with federal regulations Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Inspection Data (Cognos) [(Total #Domestic Samples tested - Total #Unsatisfactory Domestic samples tested) / Total #Domestic Samples tested] X 100
SP 1.1.5.3 Fresh Fruits and Vegetables Expected Result Fresh fruit and vegetable products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested imported fresh fruits and vegetables samples in compliance with federal regulations Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Inspection Data (Cognos) [(Total #Imported Samples tested - Total #Unsatisfactory Imported samples tested) / Total #Imported Samples tested] X 100
Sub - Program 1.1.6 - Processed Products
MRRS Level MRRS Id Program Name Type Selection Strategic Outcome / Expected Result Outcome / Performance Indicator Data Source Methodology
SP 1.1.6.1 Processed Products Expected Result Federally registered processed products establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered processed products establishments in compliance with federal regulations Processed Products Inspection Data (Manual sources) [(Total # establishments inspected – Total #warning letters/suspensions/cancellations*) / Total #establishments inspected] X 100
*Total # warning letters/suspensions/cancellations: Total # of enforcement actions (warning letters are only counted for infractions related to establishments that are NOT in compliance with regulations)
SP 1.1.6.2 Processed Products Expected Result Processed products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic processed products in compliance with federal regulations Processed Products Inspection Data (Cognos) [(Total #Domestic Samples tested - Total #Unsatisfactory Domestic samples tested) / Total #Domestic Samples tested] X 100
SP 1.1.6.3 Processed Products Expected Result Processed products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested imported processed products in compliance with federal regulations Processed Products Inspection Data (Cognos) [(Total # Imported Samples tested - Total # Unsatisfactory Imported samples tested) / Total # Imported Samples tested] X 100
Sub - Program 1.1.7 - Imported and Manufactured Food Products
MRRS Level MRRS Id Program Name Type Selection Strategic Outcome / Expected Result Outcome / Performance Indicator Data Source Methodology
SP 1.1.7.1 Imported and Manufactured Food Products Expected Result Risks to the Canadian public associated with imported and manufactured food (IMF) products are mitigated Percentage of major health risks in the imported and manufactured food sector that are addressed through the annual update to food safety inspection programs Imported & Manufactured Food Inspection Data (Manual sources) [(#Major IMF health risks identified by the IMF Program that are addressed in inspection strategies) / #Major IMF health risks identified by the IMF Program] X 100
SP 1.1.7.2 Imported and Manufactured Food Products Expected Result Risks to the Canadian public associated with imported and manufactured food (IMF) products are mitigated Percentage of inspected IMF products with accurate net quantity, composition, labelling and advertising Imported & Manufactured Food Inspection Data (Sprint) [Total #Satisfactory assessments / Total #Assessments] X 100

Program 1.2 - Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

MRRS Level MRRS Id Program Name Type Selection Strategic Outcome / Expected Result Outcome / Performance Indicator Data Source Methodology
P 1.2.1 Animal Health and Zoonotics Program Expected Result Risks to Canadians from the transmission of animal diseases to humans are minimized Number of reportable animal diseases that have entered into Canada via specified regulated pathways Animal Health Programs, Science (Electronic and manual source) Count of notifications confirming entry of reportable Animal Diseases from Animal Products and By-Products, and Live Animals and Germplasm areas
P 1.2.2 Animal Health and Zoonotics Program Expected Result Risks to Canadians from the transmission of animal diseases to humans are minimized Percentage of cases where investigations were completed following the positive identification of a reportable zoonotic disease Animal Health Programs, Science (Electronic and manual source) [Number of investigations completed following suspicion or positive identification / Number of investigations started following suspicion or positive identification for reportable zoonotic diseases for which CFIA has a control program] X 100
P 1.2.3 Animal Health and Zoonotics Program Expected Result Domestic and imported animals and animal products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Percentage of legally exported animal and animal product shipments destined for foreign markets that meet certification requirements Animal Health Programs (Electronic and manual source) [(Number of animal and animal product shipments that were legally exported with an export certificate - Number that were rejected by destination country) / Number of animal and animal product shipments that were legally exported with an export certificate] x 100
P 1.2.4 Animal Health and Zoonotics Program Expected Result Domestic and imported animals and animal products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Canada's status on the OIE disease risk status lists remains either "free, "controlled risk" or "negligible risk" OIE Website Status Maintained
P 1.2.5 Animal Health and Zoonotics Program Expected Result Risks to the Canadian animal resource base are mitigated Percentage of cases where investigations were completed following the positive identification of a reportable animal disease Animal Health Programs, Science (Electronic and manual source) [Number of investigations completed following positive identification / Number of investigations started following positive identification for reportable animal diseases for which CFIA has a control program] X 100
P 1.2.6 Animal Health and Zoonotics Program Expected Result Effective preparedness to prevent, control, and eradicate transboundary diseases and emerging diseases Manuals for CFIA officials are updated as needed Animal Health Programs (Electronic and manual source) Number of manuals updated compared to Number of manuals requiring updates
P 1.2.7 Animal Health and Zoonotics Program Expected Result Effective preparedness to prevent, control, and eradicate transboundary diseases and emerging diseases Number of emergency preparedness simulation exercises and drills in which CFIA participates Animal Health Programs (Electronic and manual source) Count of emergency preparedness exercises and drills in which CFIA participates
P 1.2.8 Animal Health and Zoonotics Program Expected Result Disease outbreaks in Canada are promptly and effectively responded to Percentage of detections of reportable transboundry diseases and significant emerging in which an investigation was commenced in a timely fashion Animal Health Programs, Science (Electronic and manual source) [Number of timely commencements for investigations of detections of reportable animal diseases for which CFIA has a control program / Number of all investigations started for detections of reportable animal diseases for which CFIA has a control program] X 100
P 1.2.9 Animal Health and Zoonotics Program Expected Result Disease outbreaks in Canada are promptly and effectively responded to Percentage of cases where CFIA communicated with key stakeholders in a timely fashion following the confirmation of a transboundry or significant emerging disease Animal Health Programs (Electronic and manual source) [Number of cases where key stakeholders were communicated with in a timely fashion / Number of key stakeholder communications following the confirmation of a reportable animal disease or significant emerging disease] X 100
Sub - Program 1.2.1 - Terrestrial Animal Health
MRRS Level MRRS Id Program Name Type Selection Strategic Outcome / Expected Result Outcome / Performance Indicator Data Source Methodology
SP 1.2.1.1 Terrestrial Animal Health Expected Result Federally registered veterinary biologics establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered veterinary biologics establishments in compliance with federal regulations Terrestrial Animal Health Programs (Electronic and manual source) [Number of inspected federally registered veterinary biologics establishments in compliance / Number of establishments inspected] X 100
SP 1.2.1.2 Terrestrial Animal Health Expected Result Veterinary biological products in compliance with federal regulations Percentage of tested veterinary biological products in compliance with federal regulations Terrestrial Animal Health Programs (Electronic and manual source) [Number of regulated veterinary biological products in compliance / Number of products tested] X 100
SP 1.2.1.3 Terrestrial Animal Health Expected Result Animals in Canada are transported humanely Percentage of inspected live loads in compliance with humane transport standards Terrestrial Animal Health Programs (Electronic and manual source) [Number of inspected live loads in compliance / Number of live loads inspected] X 100
Sub - Program 1.2.2 - Aquatic Animal Health
MRRS Level MRRS Id Program Name Type Selection Strategic Outcome / Expected Result Outcome / Performance Indicator Data Source Methodology
SP 1.2.2.1 Aquatic Animal Health Expected Result Domestic aquatic animals and their products are compliant with Canadian regulations and meet the standards of international agreements Percentage of certified aquatic animal and aquatic animal product shipments that meet the receiving country's import requirements Aquatic Animal Health Program (Manual and Electronic sources) [(Number of certificates issued for certified products - Number of instances where foreign import requirements were not met (monitored based on country refusal of Canadian goods)) / Number of certificates issued for aquatic animals and animal products] X 100
SP 1.2.2.2 Aquatic Animal Health Expected Result Risks to the Canadian aquatic animal resource base are mitigated Number of reportable aquatic animal diseases that have entered into Canada via specified regulated pathways Animal Aquatic Animal Health division (Electronic and Manual sources) Count of reportable aquatic animal diseases that have entered Canada via regulated pathways Methodology: Clients are required under the Health of Animals Regulations Section 5 to report suspicion of disease. Each report is investigated, an Aquatic Questionnaire form is filled in and recorded in an excel spreadsheet. To determine the number of diseases that enter via regulated pathways requires a count of the Aquatic reports at the end of the year. Currently the count just includes the import regulated pathway as the domestic NAAHP program has not been implemented as a regulated pathway.
Sub - Program 1.2.3 - Feed
MRRS Level MRRS Id Program Name Type Selection Strategic Outcome / Expected Result Outcome / Performance Indicator Data Source Methodology
SP 1.2.3.1 Feed Expected Result Feed establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected feed establishments in compliance with Feeds Regulations and Health of Animals Regulations (Feed Ban), after follow-up, not including labelling tasks Animal feed division (Electronic and Manual sources) [(Number of active facilities - Number of facilities with open, overdue Corrective Action Requests (CARs) not associated with labelling) / Number of active facilities] X 100
SP 1.2.3.2 Feed Expected Result Feed labels meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected feed facilities in compliance with Feeds Regulations and Health of Animals Regulations (Feed Ban), after follow-up, when assessed against inspection tasks associated with labelling Animal feed division (Electronic and Manual sources) [(Number of active facilities - Number of facilities with open, overdue Corrective Action Requests (CARs) associated with labelling) / Number of active facilities] X 100

Program 1.3 - Plant Resource Program

MRRS Level MRRS Id Program Name Type Selection Strategic Outcome / Expected Result Outcome / Performance Indicator Data Source Methodology
P 1.3.1 Plant Resource Program Expected Result Risks to the Canadian plant resource base from imported plants and plant products are mitigated Number of regulated foreign plant pests that enter into Canada through regulated pathways and establish themselves Plant Health & Biosecurity Directorate (Electronic & Manual Collection) Count of reported detections of regulated pests not previously known to be present in Canada which have entered Canada via a regulated pathway and established themselves
P 1.3.2 Plant Resource Program Expected Result Domestic plants and plants products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Percentage of domestic seed, crop inputs and plants with novel traits in compliance with Canadian regulations and international agreements Plant Health & Biosecurity Directorate (Electronic & Manual Collection) [Number of tested domestic seed, inspected plants with novel traits, and inspected fertilizer and supplement products in compliance / Number of inspected products] x 100%
P 1.3.3 Plant Resource Program Expected Result Confirmed introductions of quarantine pests in Canada are contained and risk-mitigated (e.g. through the issuance of Notices of Prohibition of Movement, Quarantine, up to and including the issuance of Ministerial Orders) Percentage of confirmed introductions of quarantine pests for which notices are issued Plant Health & Biosecurity Directorate (Electronic & Manual Collection) [Number of notices issued by Operation Staff for pests listed in the NAPPO Official Pest Reports for Canada / Number of pests listed in the NAPPO Official Pest Reports for Canada] x 100%
P 1.3.4 Plant Resource Program Expected Result Confirmed introductions of quarantine pests in Canada are contained and risk-mitigated (e.g. through the issuance of Notices of Prohibition of Movement, Quarantine, up to and including the issuance of Ministerial Orders) Percentage of notices issued in a timely manner Plant Health & Biosecurity Directorate (Electronic & Manual Collection) [Number of notices issued in a timely manner / Number of confirmed notices issued] X 100
P 1.3.5 Plant Resource Program Expected Result Canadian exports of plants and plant products meet the country of destination regulatory phytosanitary import requirements and Canada's reputation is maintained Percentage of certified plants and plant products shipment (lots) that meet the country of destination phytosanitary import requirements Plant Health & Biosecurity Directorate (Electronic & Manual Collection) [(Number of phytosanitary certificates issued by CFIA - Number of Notices of Non-compliance issued by foreign countries for shipments where CFIA issued a phytosanitary certificate) / Number of phytosanitary certificates issued by CFIA] x 100
Sub - Program 1.3.1 - Plant Protection
MRRS Level MRRS Id Program Name Type Selection Strategic Outcome / Expected Result Outcome / Performance Indicator Data Source Methodology
SP 1.3.1.1 Plant Protection Expected Result Pre-border plant pest risks are mitigated Percentage of inspected shipments from off-shore system approaches or pre-clearance programs in compliance with federal regulations Plant Health & Biosecurity Directorate (Electronic & Manual Collection) [Number of inspected shipments from off-shore systems or pre-clearance in compliance / Number of inspected shipments from off-shore systems or pre-clearance] X 100
SP 1.3.1.2 Plant Protection Expected Result At-Border plant pest risks are mitigated Percentage of pre-arrival documentation that is in compliance with plant pest-related import requirements Plant Health & Biosecurity Directorate (Electronic & Manual Collection) [Number of instances where pre-arrival documentation are in compliance / Number of pre-arrival documents reviewed] X 100
SP 1.3.1.3 Plant Protection Expected Result Post-border plant pest risks are mitigated Percentage of new pests detections that have a science based management plan initiated within one year Plant Health & Biosecurity Directorate (Electronic & Manual Collection) [Number of new pest detections from previous fiscal year that have a science based management plan initiated within one year / Number of new pest detections from previous fiscal year] X 100
Sub - Program 1.3.2 - Seed
MRRS Level MRRS Id Program Name Type Selection Strategic Outcome / Expected Result Outcome / Performance Indicator Data Source Methodology
SP 1.3.2.1 Seed Expected Result Seed complies with federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic pedigreed seed lots in compliance with federal regulations Seed Program/Saskatoon Laboratory, Seed Science and Technology Section Database (Electronic sources) [Number of tested domestic pedigreed seed lots in compliance / Number of tested domestic pedigreed seed lots] X 100
SP 1.3.2.2 Seed Expected Result Seed complies with federal regulations Percentage of authorized confined releases of Plants with Novel Traits (PNTs) into the Canadian environment that are in compliance with the authorized conditions FileMaker Pro 9 (Electronic sources) [Number of authorized confined releases of PNTs in compliance / Number of authorized confined releases of PNTs] X 100
Sub - Program 1.3.3 - Fertilizer
MRRS Level MRRS Id Program Name Type Selection Strategic Outcome / Expected Result Outcome / Performance Indicator Data Source Methodology
SP 1.3.3.1 Fertilizer Expected Result Fertilizer and supplement products meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected fertilizer and supplement products in compliance with federal regulations (Fertilizers Regulations) Fertilizer Program (Electronic and manual sources)
Operations Planning Module & Laboratory Sample Tracking System etc.
[Number of inspected fertilizer and supplement products in compliance/ Number of inspected products] x 100%
SP 1.3.3.2 Fertilizer Expected Result Fertilizer and supplement products meet federal regulations Percentage of submissions reviewed within the prescribed service delivery standards Fertilizer Program (Electronic and manual sources - MS Access file tracker database) [Number of submissions reviewed that meet service standards/ Number of submissions reviewed] x 100%
Sub - Program 1.3.4 Intellectual Property Rights
MRRS Level MRRS Id Program Name Type Selection Strategic Outcome / Expected Result Outcome / Performance Indicator Data Source Methodology
SP 1.3.4.1 Intellectual Property Rights Expected Result Plant breeders develop new varieties for the Canadian market Percentage of Plant Breeders' Rights applications that reach approval and are granted rights Plant Breeders' Rights Office (Electronic source) [Total delays in publishing (days) / 365] x100

Program 1.4 - International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

MRRS Level MRRS Id Program Name Type Selection Strategic Outcome / Expected Result Outcome / Performance Indicator Data Source Methodology
P 1.4.1 International Collaboration and Technical Agreements Expected Result Canadian interests are reflected in science-based international rules, standards, Free Trade Agreements, and technical arrangements through effective participation in sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) negotiations and International Standards Setting Bodies (ISSB) such as Codex, OIE, and IPPC Number of key sanitary and phytosanitary negotiations and international standards setting bodies meetings where the CFIA promoted Canada's interests Electronic and manual sources Count of key sanitary and phytosanitary negotiations and international standard setting body meetings where the CFIA clearly articulated Canadian positions and promoted Canada's interests.
P 1.4.2 International Collaboration and Technical Agreements Expected Result International markets are accessible to Canadian food, animals, plants, and their products Number of unjustified non-tariff barriers resolved. Electronic and manual sources Compilation of market access successes (for export) throughout the year (i.e. access gained, regained or maintained by: agreed certificates, equivalency agreement or other form of bilateral agreements)
P 1.4.3 International Collaboration and Technical Agreements Expected Result International regulatory cooperation, relationship building and technical assistance activities that are inline with the CFIA's mandate Number of senior level CFIA-led committees with foreign regulatory counterparts Electronic and manual sources Count of senior level CFIA-led committees with foreign regulatory counterparts (extrapolated from indicator text)
P 1.4.4 International Collaboration and Technical Agreements Expected Result International regulatory cooperation, relationship building and technical assistance activities that are inline with the CFIA's mandate Number of CFIA led technical assistance activities provided to foreign national governments Electronic and manual sources Number of technical assistance requests, triaged, considered and approved by Intra-Agency Technical Assistance Committee for delivery by the Agency
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