ARCHIVED - 2015-16 Report on Plans and Priorities

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Table of Contents

Minister's Message

The Honourable Rona Ambrose, PC, MP
Minister of Health

Honourable Rona Ambrose

I am pleased to report that food safety continues to be a priority for the Government of Canada as I present to Parliament, and to Canadians, the CFIA's 2015-16 Report on Plans and Priorities.

The Government will continue to strive to ensure that CFIA remains a world-class regulator in the food safety, animal health, and plant resources protection sectors. In November 2014, the Conference Board of Canada, in collaboration with the University of Guelph's Food Institute, ranked Canada's food safety system as the best in the world, which is a confirmation of our high standards.

As part of Agency Transformation, the CFIA will continue implementing the Safe Food for Canadians Action Plan to modernize Canada's food safety system and adapt it to the Canadian consumer, global and scientific trends.

I am also pleased to report that the proposed Agricultural Growth Act, Bill C-18, which passed Third Reading in the House of Commons in November 2014, and is now before the Senate, will not only help Canadian farmers benefit from the latest scientific research from around the world, but will also provide the CFIA with the authority to consider foreign reviews, data and analyses during the approval or registration of new agricultural products in Canada. It will also allow for a more effective approvals process.

The CFIA will continue to work diligently in collaboration and partnership with industry, consumers, universities, and federal, provincial and municipal organizations, to protect Canadians from preventable health risks related to food and zoonotic diseases.

The Government also remains focussed on expanding market access for Canadian producers, ensuring a safe and healthy environment for Canadians, and a thriving Canadian food, animal health, and plant resources industry. As such, the CFIA will continue to actively participate in the joint US-Canada Beyond the Border (BtB) and Regulatory Cooperation Council (RCC) initiatives. These initiatives aim to facilitate trade and retain Canadian consumers confidence in Canada's food supply.

Mitigating risks to food safety remains the CFIA's highest priority as it works closely with Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada, under the Health portfolio.

Safeguarding the health and well-being of Canada's people, environment, and economy will continue to be the driving force behind the design and development of the CFIA's programs.

The Honourable Rona Ambrose, PC, MP
Minister of Health

Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview

Organizational Profile

Minister: The Honourable Rona Ambrose, PC, MP

Deputy Head: Bruce Archibald

Ministerial portfolio: Health

Year established: 1997

Main legislative authorities:

CFIA Wide
Food Safety
Plant
Animal Health

Organizational Context

Raison d'être

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is Canada's largest science-based regulatory agency. It has approximately 6,925 employeesFootnote 1 working across Canada in the National Capital Region (NCR) and in four operational areas (Atlantic, Quebec, Ontario and Western).

The CFIA is dedicated to safeguarding food, animal, and plant health, which enhances the health and well-being of Canada's people, environment, and economy.

The CFIA develops and delivers inspection and other services in order to:

  • prevent and manage food safety risks;
  • protect plant resources from pests, diseases and invasive species;
  • prevent and manage animal and zoonotic diseases;
  • contribute to consumer protection; and
  • contribute to market access for Canada's food, plants, and animals.

The CFIA bases its activities on science, effective risk management, commitment to service and efficiency, and collaboration with domestic and international organizations that share its objectives.

Responsibilities

The CFIA is responsible for administrating and enforcing 13 federal statutes and 38 sets of regulations, for regulating the safety and quality of food sold in Canada, and for supporting a sustainable plant and animal resource base. In November 2012, the Safe Food for Canadians Act received Royal Assent. This new legislation, when in force, will also bring into effect new regulations that provide the necessary legal framework for a more consistent approach to strengthening food inspection in Canada. The Safe Food for Canadians Act consolidates and will replace the Fish Inspection Act, the Canada Agricultural Products Act, the Meat Inspection Act, and the food provisions of the Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act.

The CFIA shares many of its core responsibilities with other federal departments and agencies, with provincial, territorial and municipal authorities, with private industry, and with other stakeholders. The CFIA works with its partners to implement food safety measures; manage food, animal, and plant risks, incidents and emergencies; and promotes the development of food safety and disease control systems to maintain the safety of Canada's high-quality agriculture, agri-food, aquaculture and fishery products. The CFIA's activities include verifying the compliance of imported products; registering and inspecting establishments; testing food, animals, plants, and their related products; and approving the use of many agricultural inputs.

The CFIA's Key Federal Partners

  • Health Canada
  • Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
  • Public Health Agency of Canada
  • Canada Border Services Agency
  • Canadian Grain Commission
  • Public Safety Canada
  • Fisheries and Oceans Canada
  • Natural Resources Canada, including Canadian Forest Service
  • Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada
  • Environment Canada, including Canadian Wildlife Service

Additionally, the CFIA actively participates in international fora for the development of international science-based rules, standards, guidelines and policies. It also engages in the management of sanitary and phytosanitary committees established under international agreements and actively promotes the Canadian science-based regulatory system among foreign trading partners. The CFIA negotiates to resolve scientific and technical issues, contributing to market access for Canadian goods. It also provides scientific advice, develops new technologies, provides testing services, and conducts regulatory research.

At the CFIA, decisions are based on high-quality, timely, relevant science. Science informs policy development and program design and delivery through foresight, advice, risk assessment, the influence of international standards, research and development, and testing.

Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture (PAA)

To effectively fulfill its responsibilities in safeguarding Canada's food supply and sustaining its animal and plant resource base, the CFIA aims to achieve its strategic outcomeFootnote 2 (A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base). The CFIA's Program Alignment Architecture (PAA) illustrates the Agency's plans to allocate and manage its resources to achieve the corresponding expected results. The CFIA's PAA framework, through which resources are allocated for effective delivery of its mandate and performance reporting to Parliament, consists of:

1. Strategic Outcome: A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

  • 1.1. Program: Food Safety Program
    • 1.1.1. Sub Program: Meat and Poultry
    • 1.1.2. Sub Program: Egg
    • 1.1.3. Sub Program: Dairy
    • 1.1.4. Sub Program: Fish and Seafood
    • 1.1.5. Sub Program: Fresh Fruits and Vegetables
    • 1.1.6. Sub Program: Processed Products
    • 1.1.7. Sub Program: Imported and Manufactured Food Products
  • 1.2. Program: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
    • 1.2.1. Sub Program: Terrestrial Animal Health
    • 1.2.2. Sub Program: Aquatic Animal Health
    • 1.2.3. Sub Program: Feed
  • 1.3. Program: Plant Resources Program
    • 1.3.1. Sub Program: Plant Protection
    • 1.3.2. Sub Program: Seed
    • 1.3.3. Sub Program: Fertilizer
    • 1.3.4. Sub Program: Intellectual Property Rights
  • 1.4. Program: International Collaboration and Technical Agreements
  • Internal Services

Organizational Priorities

The Government is paving the way forward to ensure that CFIA remains a world-class regulator in the food, animal health, and plant sectors. For 2015-16, CFIA will continue transforming itself by:

  • Innovating processes and systems;
  • Partnering domestically and internationally; and,
  • Collaborating with stakeholders.
Transforming through innovation, partnership, and collaboration will help the Agency achieve the objectives and priorities outlined in the Agency's Long-Term Strategic Plan (LTSP). The LTSP helps the CFIA to mitigate risk, strengthen its foundation, and effectively deliver core program activities.
Priority TypeTable Note 3 Strategic Outcome and/or Program Description
An increased focus on prevention which will provide an opportunity to minimize risks to human, animal and ecosystem health Previously committed to Food Safety Program, Animal Health and Zoonotics Program, Plant Resource Program and International Collaboration and Technical Agreements Integrating proactive and preventive risk management approaches into all CFIA programs and bolstering these approaches with a clear inclusive focus on partnerships and information sharingTable Note 4, will help the CFIA to anticipate, prevent, prepare, and manage issues, including managing emergencies. Under this priority, the CFIA has established the following goals:
  • stakeholders have a clear and common understanding of the primary role that they play in managing risk;
  • Continue to implement legislative and regulatory modernization within the Agency;
  • proactive and preventive risk management approaches are integrated into all CFIA programs;
  • inspection systems are designed to verify industry's prevention systems; and
  • partnerships, networks and information sharing help the CFIA anticipate, prevent, and prepare.
The CFIA's role as an effective regulator will be enhanced by a focus on service excellence Previously committed to Food Safety Program, Animal Health and Zoonotics Program, Plant Resource Program and International Collaboration and Technical Agreements Strengthening the CFIA's citizen-centred service delivery culture will result in enhanced program delivery and increased confidence in the Agency as a trusted and credible regulator by domestic and international stakeholders. Under this priority, the CFIA has established the following goals:
  • service culture is embedded within the Agency. The Complaints and Appeals Office provides a single-window for stakeholders to register complaints, compliments and comments related to CFIA's regulatory decisions or service delivery;
  • the CFIA is a trusted, transparent and credible regulator with adaptable, predictable and consistent program delivery; and
  • CFIA services support efficient and effective regulation of the marketplace that it regulates.
Adapt and evolve to meet new demands and expectations with a focus on internal performance excellence Previously committed to All Programs Optimizing performance will enable the CFIA to evaluate the effectiveness of the Agency's policies and programs in order to allocate resources to areas of highest risk. Under this priority, the CFIA has established the following goals:
  • strong internal management systems and governance that support risk-based planning and resource allocation; and
  • a performance management mindset is embedded in the Agency.
Focusing on people who are supported by training and tools Previously committed to All Programs Focusing on diverse talent, supported by training and modern tools will result in a stable and skilled CFIA workforce with adaptable and motivated employees. Under this priority, the CFIA has established the following goals:
  • the CFIA continues to retain and attract competent, qualified, and motivated personnel;
  • individuals have the tools, training and information they need to support the Agency and progress in their careers; and
  • the CFIA has the culture it needs to achieve the Long-Term Strategic Plan – a culture of engagement.

Table Notes

Table Note 3

Type is defined as follows: previously committed to – committed to in the first or second fiscal year prior to the subject year of the report; ongoing – committed to at least three fiscal years prior to the subject year of the report; and new – newly committed to in the reporting year of the Report on Plans and Priorities or the Departmental Performance Report.

Return to table note 3 referrer

Table Note 4

The exchange of information among partners will be conducted according to applicable provincial and/or federal access to information and privacy legislation and common law principles, and existing information-sharing arrangements.

Return to table note 4 referrer

Risk Analysis

While delivering its mandate, the Agency is implementing an ambitious transformation agenda that includes innovation and integrated risk management. Across the Agency, integrated risk management is an integral part of policy, priority setting, planning, resourcing, delivery, review and reporting activities.

Collaborating with domestic and international partners and stakeholders as applicable, the CFIA identifies and manages risks to Canada's food supply and plant and animal resource bases. Some factors influencing key risks faced by the Agency include:

  • An increase in the volume and variety of imports;
  • An increase in export opportunities for Canadian producers;
  • Evolution in international standards and requirements;
  • An increasingly knowledgeable, demanding and risk-averse consumer and stakeholder base
  • Ongoing emergence of new pathogens and the emergence of global supply chains; and,
  • Rapid advances in processing and manufacturing technologies.

Developing and maintaining strong integrated risk management practices provide an organization with the knowledge upon which it can confidently identify and manage its risks. The Agency's Corporate Risk Profile (CRP) is the cornerstone of the CFIA's integrated risk management process. The CRP is developed through research, consultations, and collaboration which supports the Agency's planning, monitoring and reporting processes. The CFIA also applies a cyclical risk assessment of its business lines for Food Safety, Plant Resource and Animal Health. Business line-specific risk assessments manage and mitigate Business line risks and guide risk based planning and priority setting. From an operational perspective, the Agency's newly developed risk-based oversight processes guide inspection activities and demonstrate continuous refinement and improvement of risk management.

Although the Agency's key risks have not changed, the CFIA's operating environment has evolved significantly. The Agency reviewed the CRP in 2014 to determine the current severity and tolerance of the previously identified risks, and revisit the strategies mitigating them. The results of this process have directly informed the priorities presented in Section 1 under Organizational Priorities as well as the mitigation strategies presented throughout this report.

Table 1 provides the highlights of the CFIA's key strategic risks, ranked in terms of likelihood and impact and gives the planned response strategies to those risks. All risks link to the organization's Program Alignment Architecture.

Table 1: Key Risks
Risk Risk Response Strategy Link to Program Alignment Architecture

Managing Change
The ability to effectively manage change on an ongoing basis.

  • Agency Transformation
  • Human Resource Modernization (Improved Agency Human Resources Model (iAHM)
  • Reinforce Values and Ethics
  • Enhanced Project Management
  • Enhance Service and Communication
  • Strengthen planning, performance monitoring, and reporting
  • Public and stakeholder engagement on key Agency initiatives through the Agency's Healthy and Safe Food Regulatory Forum.
Strategic outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base

Information Management and Information Technology (IM/IT)
The ability to make accurate and risk-based decisions, using timely, accurate and useful data and information.

  • Agency Transformation
  • A flexible and scalable Electronic Service Delivery Platform (ESDP) designed to modernize inspection and support risk-based decision making
  • Collaborations with Shared Services Canada
  • Business Information Management Centre
  • IM/IT Strategic Plan
Strategic outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base

Transparency and Leveraging Relationships
Opportunity for the Agency to increase transparency and accountability to stakeholders.

  • Creation of Single Window Information Portal
  • User Fees / Service Standards Modernization
  • Communication and stakeholder engagement (e.g. Internal and External Communication Strategies)
  • International engagement
  • Public and stakeholder engagement on key Agency initiatives through the Agency's Healthy and Safe Food Regulatory Forum.
Strategic outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base

Emergency Management
The ability to respond to multiple, simultaneous, or large-scale emergencies.

  • Agency Strategic Emergency Management Plan
  • Maintenance and monitoring of current Emergency Management preparedness / response mitigation strategies
Strategic outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base

Scientific Capability
The ability to have the scientific capability to adapt and respond in a timely manner.

  • CFIA Science Action Plan
  • Food Safety Information Network
  • Modernizing Equipment and Laboratories
  • Enhancing Laboratory Response Capacity
Strategic outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base

Legislative, Regulatory, and Program Frameworks
The ability of the current legislative, regulatory and program frameworks to support the effective delivery of the Agency's mandate.

  • Legislative Modernization
  • Regulatory Modernization
  • Business transformation / Program frameworks
Strategic outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base

Inspection Effectiveness
The ability to have the appropriate inspection effectiveness to expeditiously prevent, detect and respond to food safety, animal and plant health issues.

  • Integrated Agency Inspection Model (iAIM)
  • Risk Assessment (Risk Based Oversight)
  • Ongoing recruitment, training, and provision of tools for inspectors
  • Strengthen planning, performance monitoring, and reporting.
Strategic outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base

Planned Expenditures

The following tables present the CFIA's total 2015-16 Planned Spending levels and full-time equivalents for the next three fiscal years (2015-16 to 2017-18), excluding funding extensions that the Agency plans to pursue. The tables also reflect the 2015-16 Main Estimates amount for which parliamentary approval will be sought.

Budgetary Financial Resources – (Planned Spending - $ dollars)
2015-16 Main Estimates 2015-16 Planned Spending 2016-17 Planned Spending 2017-18 Planned Spending
698,151,888 705,551,888 669,017,128 664,017,658
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents - FTEsTable Note 5)
2015-16 2016-17 2017–18
6,148 5,953 5,949

Table Notes

Table Note 5

Full-Time Equivalent (FTE): A measure of human resource consumption, it calculates the number of assigned hours of work over the total hours of regularly scheduled work (37.5 hours per week over 12 months). For example, an employee who works half-time (18.75 hours per week) over a 12-month period is equivalent to a 0.5 FTE.

Return to table note 5 referrer

The 2015-16 Planned Spending is approximately $7.4 million higher than the Main Estimates for the same period. This difference is due to planned transfers from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) to the CFIA to support the joint objectives through the Portfolio Market Access Secretariat and to support initiatives that address food safety, biosecurity and traceability under Growing Forward 2.

In 2017-18 the $41.5 million decrease in planned spending and 199 decrease in planned FTE's are primarily related to sunsetting resources for initiatives under various programs, partially offset by the increased resources to strengthen Canada's food safety oversight system. The Agency will assess the level of resources required for sunsetting initiatives and seek renewal as required to maintain and continuously improve Canada's strong food safety system; and, safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

Budgetary Planning Summary for Strategic Outcome and Program(s) (dollars)
Strategic Outcome, Programs and Internal Services 2012-13 Expenditures 2013-14 Expenditures 2014-15 Forecast Spending 2015-16 Main Estimates 2015-16 Planned Spending 2016-17 Planned Spending 2017-18 Planned Spending
Strategic Outcome: A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base
Food Safety Program 353,600,998 364,310,525 355,137,093 362,958,350 363,836,779 330,823,048 327,548,878
Animal Health and Zoonotics Program 175,425,417 187,939,265 94,324,803 113,659,211 114,552,020 114,141,479 114,069,887
Plant Resources Program 88,983,164 86,537,966 78,054,056 76,204,256 76,730,103 75,937,906 75,866,254
International Collaboration and Technical Agreements 33,338,750 35,004,557 31,264,551 30,000,919 34,682,935 34,642,625 34,642,688
Strategic Outcome 1 Sub Total 651,348,329 673,792,313 558,780,503 582,822,736 589,801,837 555,545,058 552,127,707
Internal Services 130,707,396 131,959,340 115,800,501 115,329,152 115,750,051 113,472,070 111,889,951
Total 782,055,725 805,751,653 674,581,004 698,151,888 705,551,888 669,017,128 664,017,658

2012-13 and 2013-14 information represents final expenditures. The 2014-15 Forecast Spending reflects the Agency's authorities as at 2014-15 Supplementary Estimates (B). The 2014-15 authorities will be updated as a result of final Supplementary Estimates and other adjustments, such as allocations from TB central votes and year-end updates to Statutory Authorities. 2014-15 year-end authorities and actual expenditures will be reported in the 2014-15 Departmental Performance Report.

2015-16 through 2017-18 are planned spending authorities and exclude resources that have not yet been approved such as the renewal of sunsetting resources, annual year-end authority adjustments for statutory items, and annual allocations from TB central votes.

Major Trends:

  • Overall Agency resources decrease from 2012-13 to 2017-18 primarily due to various savings initiatives that focus on back office efficiencies and administrative changes that do not impact front line services or food safety, and the sunsetting of resources for various initiatives under the Food Safety Program. The Agency will assess the level of resources required for these initiatives and seek renewal as required to maintain and continuously improve Canada's strong food safety system; and, safe and accessible food supply.
  • The significant decrease in the Animal Health and Zoonotics Program relates to statutory compensation payments made under the Health of Animals Act in 2012-13 and 2013-14 which are not forecasted in future years.
  • The International Collaboration and Technical Agreements Program is fairly stable from year to year.
  • The decrease in Internal Services Program requirements is predominantly attributable to savings initiatives that focus on back office efficiencies and administrative changes that do not impact front line services or food safety.

Alignment of Spending With the Whole-of-Government Framework

Alignment of 2015 - 16 Planned Spending With the Whole-of-Government Framework (dollars)
Strategic Outcome Program Spending Area Government of Canada Outcome 2015-16 Planned Spending
A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base Food Safety Program Social Affairs Healthy Canadians 363,836,779
Animal Health and Zoonotics Program Social Affairs Healthy Canadians 114,552,020
Plant Resources Program Economic Affairs A clean and healthy environment 76,730,103
International Collaboration and Technical Agreements International Affairs A prosperous Canada through global commerce 34,682,935
Total Planned Spending by Spending Area (dollars)
Spending Area Total Planned Spending
Economic Affairs 76,730,103
Social Affairs 478,388,799
International Affairs 34,682,935
Government Affairs -

Departmental Spending Trend

Graph - Departmental Spending Trend. Description follows.
Description for Departmental Spending Trend Graph (Last year Description)

Actual Spending

  • Voted
    • 2012-13: 630,156,659
    • 2013-14: 611,721,194
  • Statutory
    • 2012-13: 151,899,066
    • 2013-14: 194,030,459

Forecast Spending

  • Voted
    • 2014-15: 546,533,025
  • Statutory
    • 2014-15: 128,047,979

Planned Spending

  • Voted
    • 2015-16: 570,932,625
    • 2016-17: 537,048,185
    • 2017-18: 532,109,187
  • Statutory
    • 2015-16: 134,619,263
    • 2016-17: 131,968,943
    • 2017-18: 131,908,471
  • Sunset Programs
    • 2015-16: 208,517
    • 2016-17: 36,164,305
    • 2017-18: 36,556,054

The CFIA saw a significant increase in spending in both 2012-13 and 2013-14. This increase was mainly due to statutory compensation payments made to owners of salmon with infectious salmon anaemia ordered destroyed under the Health of Animals Act. The increase can also be partially attributed to expenditures related to the startup of the Inspection Verification System Initiative in 2013-14.

The CFIA's planned spending trend increases from 2014-15 to 2015-16 primarily as a result of new funding for Food Safety Information Network and renewed funding for Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE). For 2016-17 and future years, the Agency will assess the level of resources required for sunsetting initiatives and seek renewal as required to maintain and continuously improve Canada's strong food safety system; and, safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

Estimates by Vote

For information on the CFIA's organizational appropriations, consult the 2015–16 Main Estimates on the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat website.

Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome

This section details the CFIA's planned activities for its strategic outcome as informed by a number of factors, including Government and Agency priorities, the Agency's Corporate Risk Profile, and the application of lessons learned. Lessons learned may be derived from a variety of sources, including: internal and external audits; internal program evaluations; stakeholder feedback and consultation; information from performance measurement (including quality management); and structured post-incident analysis following significant events such as an animal disease outbreak or a major food safety recall. This section features key areas on which the CFIA will focus its efforts over the next three years.

Strategic Outcome: A Safe and Accessible Food Supply and Plant and Animal Resource Base

Mitigating risks to food safety is the CFIA's highest priority. Safeguarding the health and well-being of Canada's people, environment, and economy is the driving force behind the design and development of the CFIA's programs. The CFIA, in collaboration and partnership with industry, consumers, universities, and federal, provincial and municipal organizations, continues to work towards protecting Canadians from preventable health risks related to food and zoonotic diseases.

The CFIA supports Canadian agriculture and the ability of agri-food businesses to enter domestic and global markets and compete successfully therein. To support this objective, the CFIA develops and enforces regulatory and program frameworks for imports and exports that meet both Canadian and international requirements. As such, the CFIA regularly engages in outreach and consultation activities with key stakeholders and partners (including those in industry), consumers, and international trade and standards organizations. In so doing, the CFIA is also able to maintain open and transparent communication with its stakeholder and consultative groups.

The CFIA strives for excellence and continuous improvement to achieve greater safety outcome and integrity from regulatory systems. As such, the CFIA will move towards a more preventive and systems-based approach under the integrated Agency Inspection Model to enable both the CFIA and regulated parties to more readily adapt to emerging risks and global and scientific trends. The CFIA's integrated Agency Inspection Model will apply globally recognized risk management concepts based on prevention. The integrated Agency Inspection Model replaces the improved food inspection model to fully align the strategic outcomes for all CFIA inspection work and reflect the full Agency mandate. The model represents the CFIA's vision and its approach to regulatory inspection. The CFIA began phasing the model into operation and will continue through 2020. More information about implementation will be provided to stakeholders as it progresses.

The Safe Food for Canadians Act, will further strengthen and modernize Canada's food safety system. The Agricultural Growth Act, Bill C-18, tabled in Parliament on December 9, 2013, passed Third Reading in the House of Commons in November 2014, and is now before the Senate. It is a bill designed to modernize and strengthen federal agriculture legislation, support innovation in the Canadian agriculture industry and enhance global market opportunities. The bill proposes changes to the suite of statutes that the CFIA uses to regulate our agricultural sector. As part of these changes, the CFIA will continue to work on regulatory renewal for fertilizer and feed and begin amendments of animal health and plant protection regulatory frameworks.

The CFIA is also focused on several horizontal initiatives aimed at contributing to consumer protection. Over the next year, the CFIA plans to enhance stakeholder engagement, to continue to advance its food labelling modernization and transparency initiatives and deliver on its many day to day operational activities. These day to day activities include providing the public with food recall and allergy alert notices and implementing import border blitzes designed to identify and intercept imported food items that may pose a health threat to Canadians.

In line with the improvements made to the Food Safety Program, the CFIA will implement inspection modernization for the Plant Resources and Animal Health & Zoonotics programs. This will assist the Agency to clearly define responsibilities for regulated parties and the CFIA, provide consistent oversight of sectors subject to regulations enforced by the CFIA, expand the use of science and inspection data to help focus resources on areas with the greatest risk, and adapt inspection to focus on verifying the effectiveness of regulated parties' controls.

The performance tables listed in the proceeding pages describe the performance indicators used to measure the extent to which the CFIA is achieving its single strategic outcome. (See Tables 2-1, 2-2, 2-3 and 2-4).

To be successful in delivering on its Strategic Outcome, the CFIA has developed a robust risk management discipline and fosters its use throughout the Agency. As such, the CFIA continually monitors and assesses its operating environment in order to be aware of the threats and opportunities potentially impacting the achievement of its desired outcome. A cornerstone of its risk management process is the development of an Agency-wide Corporate Risk Profile (CRP). The CFIA key corporate risks, as outlined in its CRP, are summarized in Table 1-5.

In order to mitigate these risks and achieve its strategic outcome, the Agency will, through the actions of its program activities (Food Safety, Animal Health and Zoonotics, Plant Resources, International Collaboration and Technical Agreements), concentrate its 2015-16 efforts on innovating processes and systems, partnering domestically and internationally, and collaborating with stakeholders. This will help the Agency support the following four priorities:

  • An increased focus on prevention which will provide an opportunity to minimize risks to human, animal and plant health;
  • The CFIA's role as an effective regulator will be enhanced by a focus on service excellence;
  • Adapt and evolve to meet new demands and expectations with a focus on internal performance excellence; and
  • Focusing on people who are supported by training and tools

Program 1.1: Food Safety Program

The Food Safety Program aims to mitigate risks to public health associated with diseases and other health hazards in the food supply system and to manage food safety emergencies and incidents. The program achieves its objectives by promoting food safety awareness through public engagement and verification of compliance by industry with standards and science-based regulations. The program delivers initiatives to verify that consumers receive food safety and nutrition information and to mitigate unfair market practices targeting consumers and industry. Collaboration with other governments and stakeholders further enhances the Agency's ability to track, detect and mitigate risks associated with food and the food supply system, including food-borne illness. This program supports public health and instills confidence in Canada's food system.

Financial Resources ($ dollars)
2015-16
Main Estimates
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
362,958,350 363,836,779 330,823,048 327,548,878
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
3,311 3,122 3,118

The Planned Spending for the Food Safety Program decreases by $36.3 million and 193 FTEs from 2015-16 to 2016-17. This decrease is primarily due to the sunsetting of resources for various initiatives. The decrease is partially offset by resources provided to the Agency to strengthen Canada's food safety oversight system, as announced in the 2014 Federal Budget.

The Agency will assess the level of resources required for sunsetting initiatives and seek renewal as required to maintain and continuously improve Canada's strong food safety system.

Table 2-1a: Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Risks to the Canadian public associated with the food supply system are mitigated Number of commodity areas where inspected federally-registered establishments meet established compliance targets 6 out of 6 31 March 2016
Percentage of Public Warnings for Class I food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decision 100% 31 March 2016
Percentage of Public Warnings for Class II food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decision 95% 31 March 2016
Domestic and imported food products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Number of commodity areas where tested domestic food products meet established compliance targets 6 out of 6 31 March 2016
Number of commodity areas where tested imported food products meet established compliance targets 6 out of 6 31 March 2016
Planning Highlights

New approaches to Food Regulation, Inspection and Surveillance

As part of Agency Transformation, the CFIA will continue implementing the Safe Food for Canadians Action Plan (SFCAP), to modernize Canada's food safety system and adapt it to consumer, global and scientific trends.

In support of its regulatory modernization process, the CFIA has reviewed and is redesigning its food program. In 2015-16, the CFIA will develop and implement the Single Food program that is scheduled to replace the current commodity-based sub-program structure.

The new CFIA food program is designed to:

  • Direct resources to the areas of highest risk across all food commodities;
  • Provide a strong policy foundation to support the food program;
  • Promote compliance with regulatory requirements;
  • Implement predictable and transparent regulatory response when necessary; and,
  • Support market access in international trade.

As further support to the implementation of the SFCAP, the CFIA will continue to:

  • implement the Integrated Agency Inspection Model (iAIM) as outlined in Section II; and,
  • engage with partners and stakeholders on proposed recommendations for a more modern and innovative Canadian food labelling system and collaborate with Health Canada to modernize the food standards.

Finally, as part of its modernization efforts, the CFIA will enhance its risk-based approach to its oversight activities to provide regulated parties with increased transparency and consistency. A key deliverable will be the finalization of a Risk Assessment Model for domestic food producing establishments based on the results of testing the model and expert elicitation. This Model will provide a standard and consistent tool to inform CFIA oversight decisions for licensed establishments, the type, frequency and intensity of CFIA's oversight activities being more proportional to the risks.

Collaborating with stakeholders

In Budget 2014, the CFIA received investments over the next five years to implement the Food Safety Information Network (FSIN), which will improve the Agency's ability to anticipate, detect and respond to food-borne threats and hazards. The FSIN will link food safety authorities and food testing laboratories across Canada to facilitate surveillance and food safety data sharing. In 2015-16, in partnership with the Public Health Agency of Canada, Health Canada, provinces, and territories, the CFIA will continue to build the FSIN and plan the technical infrastructure required to efficiently share food safety data.

Sub-Program 1.1.1: Meat and Poultry

The Meat and Poultry sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with meat and poultry and their products that are produced in Canada's federally registered establishments or imported for consumption. The program achieves its objectives by verifying that meat, poultry and their products meet health and safety requirements through verification of compliance with the relevant governing acts and regulations. The program also helps to mitigate unfair market practices related to labelling compliance for pre-packaged meat products, and audits the delivery of a grading program based on objective meat quality and retail yield standards. The Meat and Poultry sub-program supports confidence in Canada's meat and poultry and their products.

Financial Resources ($ dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
191,052,866 156,393,605 156,273,632
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
1,812 1,541 1,539

The planned spending for the Meat and Poultry sub-program decreases from 2015-16 to 2016-17. This decrease is primarily due to the sunsetting of resources for various initiatives. The Agency will assess the level of resources required for sunsetting initiatives and seek renewal as required to maintain and continuously improve Canada's strong food safety system.

Table 2-1b: Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Federally registered meat and poultry establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered meat and poultry establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 31 March 2016
Meat and poultry products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic meat and poultry products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 31 March 2016
Percentage of tested imported meat and poultry products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 31 March 2016
Planning Highlights

Innovating processes and systems

In 2015-16, the CFIA will continue implementation of its Modernized Slaughter Inspection Program (MSIP) that streamlines and simplifies the food inspection system. A pilot for the MSIP will be initiated in swine, poultry and bovine slaughter establishments and will create opportunities for increased partnership between the CFIA, stakeholders, and key trading partners such as the USA.

In 2014-15, the CFIA amended the Agriculture and Agri-Food Administrative Monetary Penalties Regulations to expand Administrative Monetary Penalties (AMPs) to the Meat Inspection Act and its regulations. Through AMPs and already existing enforcement options, the CFIA aims to encourage businesses and individuals to comply with regulatory requirements.

In 2015-16, as the Agency moves to a single food program structure, the proactive verification of the compliance of regulated parties and products will be undertaken in a manner that targets areas of highest risk and is based on the best available science.

Collaborating with stakeholders

As part of the Pathogen Reduction Initiative, aimed at decreasing the levels of pathogens in meat and poultry, the CFIA will publish the results of the Microbiological Baseline Study (MBS) in broiler chicken, and establish pathogen reduction targets and strategies for improved monitoring. In partnership with HC and the PHAC, the CFIA will initiate a baseline study on the prevalence of E. coli in beef.

To increase transparency and coordination between Canada and the United States, the CFIA will continue to actively participate in the joint US-Canada Beyond the Border (BtB) and Regulatory Cooperation Council (RCC) initiatives. These initiatives aim to facilitate trade and retain Canadian consumers' confidence in Canada's food supply:

Other initiatives for 2015-16 include:

  • Common Approach to Food Safety – Joint Assessments of Food Safety Systems: This initiative will advance mutual system comparability through an information sharing agreement, enhance the Canada-US food safety relationship, and serve as a precursor to deeper regulatory alignment between the two countries.
  • Equivalence Agreements for Meat Safety Systems: This initiative seeks to streamline requirements and procedures related to equivalency for meat safety systems and will establish a mechanism to maintain and promote continued alignment.
  • Certification Requirements for Meat and Poultry: This initiative will streamline the certification process, including consideration to reduce or eliminate redundant certification, data elements and administrative procedures for shipments between Canada and the US.
Sub-Program 1.1.2: Egg

The Egg sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with egg and egg products that are produced in Canada's federally registered establishments or imported for consumption. The program achieves its objectives by verifying that eggs and egg products are graded according to relevant governing acts and regulations and that they comply with the requirements of the said acts and regulations. The program also helps to mitigate unfair market practices by verifying that labelling and advertising practices meet the requirements for pre-packaged egg products. This sub-program supports confidence in Canada's egg and egg products.

Financial Resources ($ dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
8,641,142 8,144,630 8,140,826
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
83 81 81

The planned spending for the Egg sub-program decreases from 2015-16 to 2016-17. This decrease is primarily due to the sunsetting of resources for various initiatives. The Agency will assess the level of resources required for sunsetting initiatives and seek renewal as required to maintain and continuously improve Canada's strong food safety system

Table 2-1c: Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Federally registered shell egg establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered shell egg establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 31 March 2016
Shell egg and egg products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic shell egg and egg products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 31 March 2016
Percentage of tested imported shell egg and egg products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 31 March 2016
Planning Highlights

Innovating processes and systems

In 2015-16, Egg sub-program activities will continue to evolve under the Single Food Program until the integrated Agency Inspection Model is fully implemented. Efforts will continue, both within the Agency and in concert with other government departments such as Health Canada, towards improving the consistency in interpretation and delivery of the inspection program and to better focus inspection resources on areas with the greatest risk.

In 2015-16, as the Agency moves to a single food program structure, the proactive verification of the compliance of regulated parties and products will be undertaken in a manner that targets areas of highest risk and is based on the best available science.

Sub-Program 1.1.3: Dairy

The Dairy sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with dairy and dairy products that are produced in Canada's federally registered establishments or imported for consumption. The program achieves its objectives by verifying that dairy and dairy products meet health and safety requirements through verification of compliance with the governing acts and regulations. The program also helps to mitigate unfair market practices by verifying that labelling for pre-packaged dairy products meets the requirements as set out in the acts and regulations. This sub-program supports confidence in Canada's dairy products.

Financial Resources ($ dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
11,242,869 10,575,898 10,571,607
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
112 109 109

The planned spending for the Dairy sub-program decreases from 2015-16 to 2016-17. This decrease is primarily due to the sunsetting of resources for various initiatives. The Agency will assess the level of resources required for sunsetting initiatives and seek renewal as required to maintain and continuously improve Canada's strong food safety system.

Table 2-1d: Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Federally registered dairy establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered dairy establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 31 March 2016
Dairy products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic dairy products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 31 March 2016
Percentage of tested imported dairy products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 31 March 2016
Planning Highlights

Innovating processes and systems

In 2015-16, Dairy sub-program activities will continue to evolve under the Single Food Program, until the integrated Agency Inspection Model is implemented. Efforts will continue, both within the Agency and in concert with other government departments such as Health Canada, towards improving the consistency in interpretation and delivery of the inspection program and to better focus inspection resources on areas with the greatest risk.

In 2015-16, as the Agency moves to a single food program structure, the proactive verification of the compliance of regulated parties and products will be undertaken in a manner that targets areas of highest risk and is based on the best available science.

Sub-Program 1.1.4: Fish and Seafood

The Fish and Seafood sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with fish and seafood products processed in Canada's federally registered establishments or imported for consumption. It achieves its objectives by developing product and process standards and ensuing that products, importers and domestic industry comply with quality, safety and identity of fish and seafood requirements through verification of compliance with the governing acts and regulations. This sub-program supports confidence in Canada's fish and seafood products.

Financial Resources ($ dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
49,668,541 51,477,693 50,443,196
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
453 482 482
Table 2-1e: Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Federally registered fish and seafood establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered fish and seafood establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 31 March 2016
Fish and seafood products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic fish and seafood products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 31 March 2016
Percentage of tested imported fish and seafood products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 31 March 2016
Planning Highlights

Innovating processes and systems

In 2015-16, Fish and Seafood sub-program activities will continue to evolve under the Single Food Program until the integrated Agency Inspection Model is fully implemented. Efforts will continue, both within the Agency and in concert with other government departments such as Health Canada, towards improving the consistency in interpretation and delivery of the inspection program and to better focus inspection resources on areas with the greatest risk.

In 2015-16, the CFIA will continue to enhance the Canadian Shellfish Sanitation Program (CSSP). Under the CSSP, the CFIA will support the roll out of the process to reclassify under-utilized shellfish harvest areas with subsequent re-allocation to new areas with high potential.

In 2015-16, the CFIA will continue to honour Canada-US systems recognition for shellfish. In response to Budget 2014 commitments, the CFIA will enhance compliance of imported foods, by conducting a series of assessments of foreign food safety systems to seek assurances of adequate preventive upstream controls for fish and seafood.

In 2015-16, as the Agency moves to a single food program structure, the proactive verification of the compliance of regulated parties and products will be undertaken in a manner that targets areas of highest risk and is based on the best available science.

Sub-Program 1.1.5: Fresh Fruit and Vegetables

The Fresh Fruit and Vegetables sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with fresh fruits and vegetables and their products produced in federally-registered establishments or imported for consumption. It achieves its objectives by verifying that products meet all stipulated health and safety requirements through verification of compliance with the relevant governing acts and regulations. This sub-program mitigates unfair market practices by verifying that labelling and net quantity requirements for pre-packaged Fresh Fruit and Vegetable products are adhered to. This sub-program supports confidence in Canada's fresh fruit and vegetable products.

Financial Resources ($ dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
34,910,256 38,334,433 36,962,307
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
294 340 338
Table 2-1f: Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Federally registered fresh fruit and vegetables establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered fresh fruit and vegetable establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 31 March 2016
Fresh fruit and vegetable products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic fresh fruit and vegetable samples in compliance with federal regulations 95% 31 March 2016
Percentage of tested imported fresh fruit and vegetables samples in compliance with federal regulations 95% 31 March 2016
Planning Highlights

Collaborating with stakeholders

In response to Budget 2014 commitments, and to enhance compliance of imported foods, the CFIA will conduct a series of assessments of foreign food safety systems to seek assurances of adequate preventive controls for fresh fruit and vegetables. The development of an assessment approach and related tools and standards will be the initial focus.

To increase transparency and coordination between Canada and the United States, the CFIA will continue to actively participate in the joint US-Canada Beyond the Borders (BtB) and Regulatory Cooperation Council (RCC) initiatives focusing on food safety related issues. A Trusted Trader-Agri-food Pilot to reduce inspection frequencies for apples, potatoes and/or onions imported from the US will be conducted by assessing the ability of the industry in Canada and the US to manage risks related to quality standards on its own, without significant reliance on CFIA and USDA inspections.

Innovating processes and systems

In 2015-16, Fresh Fruit and Vegetable sub-program activities will continue to evolve under the Single Food Program until the integrated Agency Inspection Model is fully implemented. Efforts will continue, both within the Agency and in concert with other government departments such as Health Canada, towards improving the consistency in interpretation and delivery of the inspection program and to better focus inspection resources on areas with the greatest risk.

In 2015-16, as the Agency moves to a single food program structure, the proactive verification of the compliance of regulated parties and products will be undertaken in a manner that targets areas of highest risk and is based on the best available science.

Sub-Program 1.1.6: Processed Products

The Processed Products sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with processed products, including honey and maple products, which are produced in federally-registered establishments or imported for consumption. The program achieves its objectives by verifying that processed products comply with health and food safety requirements through verification of compliance with the relevant governing acts and regulations. This sub-program minimizes unfair market practices by verifying that labelling and net quantity requirements for pre-packaged processed products are adhered to. The program supports confidence in Canada's processed products.

Financial Resources ($ dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
11,641,531 10,903,337 10,901,778
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
102 99 99

The planned spending for the Processed Products sub-program decreases from 2015-16 to 2016-17. This decrease is primarily due to the sunsetting of resources for various initiatives. The Agency will assess the level of resources required for sunsetting initiatives and seek renewal as required to maintain and continuously improve Canada's strong food safety system.

Table 2-1g: Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Federally registered processed products establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered processed products establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 31 March 2016

Processed products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations

Percentage of tested domestic processed products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 31 March 2016
Percentage of tested imported processed products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 31 March 2016
Planning Highlights

Innovating processes and systems

In 2015-16, Processed Products sub-program activities will continue to evolve under the Single Food Program until the integrated Agency Inspection Model is fully implemented. Efforts will continue, both within the Agency and in concert with other government departments such as Health Canada, towards improving the consistency in interpretation and delivery of the inspection program and to better focus inspection resources on areas with the greatest risk.

In 2015-16, as the Agency moves to a single food program structure, the proactive verification of the compliance of regulated parties and products will be undertaken in a manner that targets areas of highest risk and is based on the best available science.

Sub-Program 1.1.7: Imported and Manufactured Food Products

The Imported and Manufactured Food Products sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with food commodities that are regulated by the relevant governing acts and regulations. The CFIA and provincial/territorial governments share the jurisdiction over IMFP because the sector includes a large variety of foods that are traded intra-provincially or inter-provincially. This program achieves its objectives by verifying that these products comply with the health, food safety, and consumer protection requirements. The program mitigates unfair market practices by verifying that requirements related to net quantity, composition, claims, labelling, and advertising of these foods are adhered to and by enforcing the governing acts and regulations. Through enforcement of the acts and regulations, the program supports confidence in Canada's imported and manufactured food products.

Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
56,679,574 54,993,452 54,255,532
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
455 470 470

The planned spending for the Imported and Manufactured Food Products sub-program decreases from 2015-16 to 2016-17. This decrease is primarily due to the sunsetting of resources for various initiatives. The Agency will assess the level of resources required for sunsetting initiatives and seek renewal as required to maintain and continuously improve Canada's strong food safety system.

Table 2-1h: Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved

Risks to the Canadian public associated with imported and manufactured food (IMF) products are mitigated

Percentage of major health risks in the imported and manufactured food sector that are addressed through the annual update to food safety inspection programs 95% 31 March 2016
Percentage of inspected IMF products with accurate net quantity, composition, labelling and advertising 70% 31 March 2016
Planning Highlights

Partnering domestically and internationally

As announced in the 2014 Economic Action Plan, the Government will modernize the compositional standard for beer to enable the industry to take full advantage of innovation and market developments. In 2015-16, the CFIA will collaborate with Health Canada to begin drafting the regulatory amendments and supporting analysis to revise the beer standards in the Food and Drug Regulations.

Innovating processes and systems

In 2015-16, Imported and Manufactured Food Products sub-program activities will continue to evolve under the Single Food Program until the integrated Agency Inspection Model is fully implemented. Efforts will continue, both within the Agency and in concert with other government departments such as Health Canada, towards improving the consistency in interpretation and delivery of the inspection program and to better focus inspection resources on areas with the greatest risk.

In 2015-16, as the Agency moves to a single food program structure, the proactive verification of the compliance of regulated parties and products will be undertaken in a manner that targets areas of highest risk and is based on the best available science.

Program 1.2: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

The Animal Health and Zoonotics Program aims to mitigate risks to Canada's animal resource base, animal feeds and animal products, which are integral to a safe and accessible food supply system as well as to public health. The program achieves its objectives by mitigating risks to Canada's animals (including livestock and aquatic animals) from regulated diseases, managing animal disease emergencies and incidents, mitigating and managing risks to livestock and derived food products associated with feed, promoting animal welfare and guarding against deliberate threats to the animal resource base. The program helps to mitigate risks associated with animal diseases that can be transmitted to humans by controlling diseases within animal populations. This program supports the health of Canada's animal resources and instills confidence in the safety of Canada's animals, animal products and by-products, and production systems.

Financial Resources ($ dollars)
2015-16
Main Estimates
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
113,659,211 114,552,020 114,141,479 114,069,887
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
974 972 972

The Planned Spending for the Animal Health and Zoonotics Program decreases by $0.5 million and 2 FTEs from 2015-16 to 2017-18, due to a decrease and the 2016-17 sunset of resources related to the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) led Single Window Initiative outlined in the Beyond the Border Action Plan.

Table 2-2a: Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Risks to Canadians from the transmission of animal diseases to humans are minimized Number of reportable animal diseases that have entered into Canada via specified regulated pathways 0 31 March 2016
Percentage of cases where investigations were completed following the positive identification of a reportable zoonotic disease 100% 31 March 2016
Domestic and imported animals and animal products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Percentage of legally exported animal and animal product shipments destined for foreign markets that meet certification requirements 99% 31 March 2016
Canada's status on the OIETable Note 6 disease risk status lists remains either "free, controlled risk, or negligible risk" Status maintained 31 March 2016
Risks to the Canadian animal resource base are mitigated Percentage of cases where investigations were completed following the positive identification of a reportable animal disease 100% 31 March 2016
Effective preparedness to prevent, control, and eradicate trans-boundary diseases and emerging diseases Manuals for CFIA officials are updated as needed All necessary manual updates are completed 31 March 2016
Number of emergency preparedness simulation exercises in which CFIA participates 9 31 March 2016
Disease outbreaks in Canada are promptly and effectively responded to Percentage of detections of reportable transboundary diseases and significant emerging diseases in which an investigation was commenced in a timely fashion 100% 31 March 2016
Percentage of cases where the CFIA communicated with key stakeholders in a timely fashion following the confirmation of a transboundary or significant emerging disease 100% 31 March 2016

Table Notes

Table Note 6

World Organisation for Animal Health.

Return to table note 6 referrer

Planning Highlights

Innovating Processes and Systems

Effective regulation contributes to the protection of the animal resource base and to a strong economy. The CFIA will continue to review the Health of Animals Regulations, in an effort to modernize the humane transport regulations. Amendments to the regulations will ensure regulatory alignment with international standards, reflect current industry practices and animals' actual needs as revealed by recent scientific research, and improve enforcement capabilities.

The CFIA will implement and enhance the Traceability National Information Portal (TNIP), including associated training and regulatory amendments, and add to the livestock traceability data-sharing agreements with provinces and territories (such as the ones with Alberta, Manitoba, Saskatchewan and PEI). These initiatives will enable a faster response to a disease event and facilitate the confinement of a disease to its origins, which will reduce the resulting animal welfare, economic and social impacts.

Partnering Domestically and Internationally

The CFIA will continue to develop an agreement to recognise foreign animal disease control and eradication zones with the United States Department of Agriculture that will protect both countries and minimise trade disruption in the event of a disease outbreak.

Sub-Program 1.2.1: Terrestrial Animal Health

The Terrestrial Animal Health sub-program aims to prevent the entry of reportable, foreign animal diseases and the spread of reportable domestic animal diseases as set out in the relevant governing acts and regulations. This sub-program achieves its objectives by delivering initiatives that track, detect, and mitigate risks to the terrestrial animal resource base. This sub-program supports food safety, public health, and protection of the animal resource base, and instills national and international confidence in Canadian agricultural products. Through verification of compliance, this sub-program supports domestic and international confidence that Canada's animals are free from certain reportable diseases, particularly those potentially transmissible to humans. This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Statutory Compensation Payments.

Financial Resources ($ dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
81,546,962 81,166,266 81,094,629
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
776 774 774
Table 2-2b: Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Federally registered veterinary biologics establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered veterinary biologics establishments in compliance with federal regulations 90% 31 March 2016
Veterinary biological products in compliance with federal regulations Percentage of tested veterinary biological products in compliance with federal regulations 100% 31 March 2016
Animals in Canada are transported humanely Percentage of inspected live loads in compliance with humane transport standards 100% 31 March 2016
Planning Highlights

Innovating Processes and Systems

The CFIA will work with the European manufacturer to institute a better management protocol for Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD) vaccines. The focus will be to re-examine the current strategy around the management of the vaccine banks in Canada, U.S and Mexico to move towards a five-year rotation of vaccine stocks.

Collaborating with Stakeholders

With renewed funding received in 2014, the CFIA will work with partners and stakeholders to review Canada's BSE programming and develop a long-term approach to BSE disease control.

Sub-Program 1.2.2: Aquatic Animal Health

The Aquatic Animal Health sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with the introduction and spread of certain aquatic animal diseases of concern to Canada. This program achieves its objectives by partnering with Fisheries and Oceans Canada to deliver on initiatives that track, detect and control aquatic animal diseases as set out in the relevant governing acts and regulations. Through verification of compliance, this sub-program supports domestic and international confidence that Canada's aquatic animal resources are free from aquatic animal diseases, and contributes to the sustainable productivity of aquaculture and harvest fisheries. This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Statutory Compensation Payments.

Financial Resources ($ dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
24,121,149 24,096,408 24,096,441
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
69 69 69
Table 2-2c: Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Domestic aquatic animals and their products are compliant with Canadian regulations and meet the standards of international agreements Percentage of certified aquatic animal and aquatic animal product shipments that meet the receiving country's import requirements 99% 31 March 2016
Risks to the Canadian aquatic animal resource base are mitigated Number of reportable aquatic animal diseases that have entered into Canada via specified regulated pathways 0 31 March 2016
Planning Highlights

Innovating Processes and Systems

The CFIA will implement the Domestic Movement Control Program for Aquatic Animals to ensure that inspection staff are well positioned to deliver services, and that risks to the Canadian aquatic animal resource base is mitigated.

The Animal Health program will begin the planning phase of Compartmentalization Programs for Aquatics. Through recognition of compartments with specified biosecurity status, trade may be maintained in the event of a disease outbreak that is effectively contained within a compartment(s).

The CFIA will continue to expand on Alternative Service Delivery (ASD) options. In 2015-16, ASD opportunities will continue to be sought with approved private and provincial laboratories for private good activities, including export certification and artificial insemination centre testing.

Sub-Program 1.2.3: Feed

The Feed sub-program aims to minimize risks associated with livestock and poultry feeds manufactured in or imported into Canada. The program achieves its objectives by verifying that feeds are safe, effective and labelled in accordance with the relevant governing acts and regulations. This sub-program contributes to the production and maintenance of a healthy and sustainable animal resource base which supports food safety and environmental sustainability. Through verification of compliance, this sub-program supports confidence in feed manufactured in Canada.

Financial Resources ($ dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
8,883,909 8,878,805 8,878,817
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
129 129 129
Table 2-2d: Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Feed establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected feed establishments in compliance with Feeds Regulations and Health of Animals Regulations (Feed Ban), after follow-up, not including labelling tasks 95% 31 March 2016
Feed labels meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected feed facilities in compliance with Feeds Regulations and Health of Animals Regulations (Feed Ban), after follow-up, when assessed against inspection tasks associated with labelling 95% 31 March 2016
Planning Highlights

Innovating Processes and Systems

Safe and effective animal feeds contribute to healthy livestock and safe food. The CFIA will undertake the modernization of feed regulations to better reflect current science, reduce overlap and redundancy, increase responsiveness to industry changes, address inconsistencies and provide clarity and flexibility to regulated parties. In doing so, the CFIA is engaging Canadians, regulated parties, stakeholders and other government departments. The proposed package will be submitted to the Canada Gazette for pre-publication in the spring of 2015.

Collaborating with Stakeholders

To prepare for the World Health Organisation's May 2015 tabling of the Global Action Plan on antimicrobial resistance (AMR), the CFIA, HC, AAFC and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) are supporting PHAC's Federal Framework for Action, which is aimed at building a national approach to AMR. The CFIA will focus on surveillance, stewardship and innovation regarding antimicrobial use in animals to ensure that a comprehensive data set is available through the Canadian Integrated Program for Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance (CIPARS).

Program 1.3: Plant Resources Program

The Plant Resources Program aims to mitigate risks to Canada's plant resource base, which is integral to a safe and accessible food supply, as well as to public health and environmental sustainability. The program achieves its objectives by regulating agricultural and forestry products; mitigating risks to the plant resource base (including crops and forests) from regulated pests and diseases; regulating the safety and integrity of seeds, fertilizers and plant products; and managing plant health emergencies and incidents. The program also guards against deliberate threats to the plant resource base, facilitates the introduction of emerging plant technologies and protects the rights of plant breeders. Achieving the objectives of the program instills confidence in Canada's plants, plant production systems and plant products, and contributes to the health of Canada's plant resources.

Financial Resources ($ dollars)
2015-16
Main Estimates
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
76,204,256 76,730,103 75,937,906 75,866,254
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
770 766 766

The Planned Spending for the Plant Resources Program decreases by $0.9 million and 4 FTEs from 2015-16 and 2017-18. The major items contributing to this decrease is the sunsetting of resources for Plum Pox Monitoring and Management, and the 2016-17 sunsetting of resources related to the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) led Single Window Initiative outlined in the Beyond the Border Action Plan.

Table 2-3a: Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Risks to the Canadian plant resource base from imported plants and plant products are mitigated Number of regulated foreign plant pests that enter into Canada through regulated pathways and establish themselves 0 31 March 2016
Domestic plants and plant products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Percentage of domestic seed, crop inputs and plants with novel traits in compliance with Canadian regulations and international agreements 90% 31 March 2016
Confirmed introductions of quarantine pests in Canada are contained and risk- mitigated (e.g. through the issuance of Notices of Prohibition of Movement, Quarantine, up to and including the issuance of Ministerial Orders) Percentage of confirmed introductions of quarantine pests for which notices are issued 100% 31 March 2016
Percentage of notices issued in a timely manner 90% 31 March 2016
Canadian exports of plants and plant products meet the country of destination regulatory requirements and Canada's reputation is maintained Percentage of certified plants and plant products shipment (lots) that meet the country of destination phytosanitary import requirements 99% 31 March 2016
Planning Highlights

Innovating processes and systems

Effective regulation contributes to the health and safety of Canadians, the protection of the plant resource base, the environment, and a strong economy.

The Agricultural Growth Act, Bill C-18, tabled in Parliament on December 9, 2013, passed Third Reading in the House of Commons in November 2014, and is now before the Senate. It is a bill designed to modernize and strengthen federal agriculture legislation, support innovation in the Canadian agriculture industry and enhance global market opportunities. The bill proposes changes to the suite of statutes that the CFIA uses to regulate our agricultural sector. Consistent with its ongoing transformation, the CFIA will be modernizing regulations and inspections related to plant resources, including fertilizer, to make them more risk and outcome-based.

Collaborating with stakeholders

The CFIA works with its partners to manage regulated risks and emergencies; and promote the development of control systems to maintain the safety of Canada's high-quality agriculture, agri-food, and forestry products.

In 2015-16, the CFIA will develop a modernized Emergency Management Strategic Framework for Plant to enhance information sharing among federal, provincial and territorial governments.

Sub-Program 1.3.1: Plant Protection

The Plant Protection sub-program aims to mitigate the risks associated with the introduction and spread of plant pests of quarantine significance to Canada. This sub-program achieves its objectives by delivering initiatives that track, detect and control, or eradicate regulated plant pests and diseases as set out in the relevant governing acts and regulations. The program verifies that plants and plant products, and their associated risk pathways, meet phytosanitary requirements. Through verification of compliance, this sub-program supports environmental sustainability, and public health and instills confidence in Canada's plants and plant products. This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Statutory Compensation Payments.

Financial Resources ($ dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
61,142,377 60,371,769 60,300,098
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
626 622 622
Table 2-3b: Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Pre-border plant pest risks are mitigated Percentage of inspected shipments from off-shore system approaches or pre-clearance programs in compliance with federal regulations 85% 31 March 2016
At-border plant pest risks are mitigated Percentage of pre-arrival documentation that is in compliance with Canadian import requirements 90% 31 March 2016
Post-border plant pest risks are mitigated Percentage of new pest detections that have a science based management plan initiated within one year 90% 31 March 2016
Planning Highlights

Collaborating with stakeholders

Asian Gypsy Moth (AGM) is an invasive insect regulated as a quarantine pest by Canada and the United States (U.S.). It poses a significant threat to Canada's forests, biodiversity, and economy. The CFIA will continue to collaborate with the US under the AGM Vessel Certification Program to prevent the introduction of the AGM by mitigating the risk of introduction at its origin – consistent with Beyond the Border Action Plan priorities. The CFIA will implement the recommendations of the joint Canada / U.S. assessments of their pilot AGM program completed in 2013. The CFIA will also engage with other countries to explore the expansion of the AGM vessel certification program.

The Asian Long-horned Beetle (ALHB) was detected in August 2013 in an industrial area near Pearson International Airport in Mississauga, Ontario. The CFIA established a quarantine area and will continue implementing eradication control measures in concert with other federal, provincial, and municipal counterparts.

On August 15, 2014, there was a detection of Potato Wart in Prince Edward Island (PEI). Potato wart is a pest of quarantine significance as it can drastically reduce yield and render a potato crop non-marketable. To prevent further spread and maintain access to various markets, the CFIA implemented immediate measures to: contain the infestation; expeditiously conduct surveillance activities; and determine the source of the contamination. Moving forward, the CFIA will continue to monitor identified PEI fields and work with the United States to lift interim import restrictions that were placed on PEI potatoes in 2014.

Innovating processes and systems

The CFIA will continue to minimize the risk of Invasive Alien Species to the Canadian environment and economy. This will be achieved through the continued enforcement of existing phytosanitary measures, and the adoption of new measures, to prevent the introduction of plants regulated as pests in Canada. Additionally, the Agency will develop a domestic primer, an educational tool for communicating with stakeholders, to outline how regulated plant pests are addressed domestically.

Sub-Program 1.3.2: Seed

The Seed sub-program aims to ensure that seeds sold in Canada meet established standards, that seeds are properly represented in the marketplace and that most agricultural crop kinds are registered before entering the marketplace. The program achieves its objectives by verifying that seeds meet quality, biosafety, labelling and registration standards as set out in the relevant governing acts and regulations. Regulating the environmental release of plants with novel traits contributes to environmental sustainability and the health and safety of Canadians. Furthermore, quality assured and accurately labelled seeds contribute to a prosperous agricultural production system and to domestic and international confidence in Canada's seeds.

Financial Resources ($ dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
10,446,956 10,431,395 10,431,408
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
98 98 98
Table 2-3c: Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Seed complies with federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic pedigreed seed lots in compliance with federal regulations 95% 31 March 2016
Percentage of authorized confined releases of Plants with Novel Traits (PNTs) into the Canadian environment that are in compliance with the authorized conditions 90% 31 March 2016
Planning Highlights

Innovating processes and systems

In an effort to maintain high quality while also gaining efficiencies, the CFIA will continue to work with industry to transfer seed crop inspections to an alternative service delivery (ASD) model. The goal of the ASD model is to reduce direct use of CFIA resources for the delivery of crop inspection by transitioning inspection to an independent third-party private sector verification. The model will maintain the integrity and reputation of Canada's Seed Certification System, foster a competitive service delivery environment for seed growers, and create opportunities to provide inspections to all growers. The CFIA is committed to providing oversight of ASD through activities such as monitoring and auditing of the parties involved in seed crop inspection.

Sub-Program 1.3.3: Fertilizer

The Fertilizer sub-program aims to ensure that regulated fertilizer, fertilizer/pesticides and supplement products sold in Canada are properly labelled and safe for humans, plants, animals, and the environment. The program achieves its objectives by verifying that all fertilizers, fertilizer / pesticides and supplements meet the standards for safety as set out in the relevant governing acts and regulations. Through verification of compliance, the program contributes to public health and environmental sustainability and supports domestic and international confidence in fertilizers, fertilizer / pesticides and supplements manufactured in Canada.

Financial Resources ($ dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
4,211,152 4,206,071 4,206,076
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
38 38 38
Table 2-3d: Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Fertilizer and supplement products meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected fertilizer and supplement products in compliance with federal regulations (Fertilizers Regulations) 90% 31 March 2016
Percentage of submissions reviewed within the prescribed service delivery standards 90% 31 March 2016
Planning Highlights

Collaborating with stakeholders

The CFIA will continue to engage with stakeholders for the comprehensive review and amendment of the Fertilizers Regulations. One of the goals of the review is to align regulatory oversight so that fertilizers and supplements that have a well-established history of being safe are subjected to appropriately reduced oversight requirements. In 2015-16, the CFIA expects to submit the resulting amendments to the Fertilizers Regulations to Canada Gazette I for pre-publication.

The CFIA regulates fertilizers and supplements that are imported into or sold in Canada. Registration and pre-market assessments are required for some fertilizer and supplement products prior to importation or sale. Consistent with the 2013 evaluation of the Fertilizer sub-program, the CFIA will continue to implement changes to enhance alignment of its pre-market assessment and marketplace monitoring activities with areas that pose the greatest risk to Canada's plants and the environment.

Innovating processes and systems

The CFIA will continue to advance user fee modernization for fertilizers and supplements to adequately reflect the Agency's resource investment into premarket assessments and enforcement in cases of non-compliance.

Sub-Program 1.3.4: Intellectual Property Rights

The Intellectual Property Rights sub-program, by which plant breeders can obtain intellectual property rights for their new plant varieties, aims to create an environment in Canada which supports innovation in plant breeding, as set out in the relevant governing acts and regulations. This sub-program achieves its objectives by assessing applications from plant breeders to determine that new plant varieties meet the criteria for protection, and when all requirements have been met, granting rights to the variety breeder/owner for a period of up to 18 years. The owner of a new variety who receives a grant of rights has exclusive rights over use of the variety, and will be able to protect his/her new variety from exploitation by others. By enforcing the relevant governing acts and regulations, this sub-program stimulates plant breeding in Canada, facilitates better access to foreign varieties for Canadian producers and supports the protection of Canadian varieties in other countries.

Financial Resources ($ dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
929,618 928,671 928,672
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
8 8 8
Table 2-3e: Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Plant breeders develop new varieties for the Canadian market Percentage of Plant Breeders' Rights applications that reach approval and are granted rights 100% 31 March 2016
Planning Highlights

Innovating processes and systems

The Agricultural Growth Act, Bill C-18, tabled in Parliament on December 9, 2013, passed Third Reading in the House of Commons in November 2014, and is now before the Senate. It is a bill designed to modernize and strengthen federal agriculture legislation, support innovation in the Canadian agriculture industry and enhance global market opportunities. The bill proposes changes to the suite of statutes that the CFIA uses to regulate our agricultural sector. Among the changes being proposed in this bill are the amendments to the CFIA's Plant Breeders' Rights Act (PBR Act) to encourage investment in plant breeding in Canada and foster more accessibility to foreign seed varieties for farmers.

Program 1.4: International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency's International Collaboration and Technical Agreements program contributes to a coherent, predictable, and science-based international regulatory framework that facilitates compliance with the regulatory requirements of importing countries' food, animals, plants, and their products, resulting in the facilitation of multi-billion dollar trade for the Canadian economy. The program achieves its objectives through active participation in international fora for the development of international science-based rules, standards, guidelines and policies and the management of sanitary and phytosanitary committees established under international agreements. The CFIA's active promotion of the Canadian science-based regulatory system among foreign trading partners and its negotiations to resolve scientific and technical issues contribute to market access. This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Federal Assistance Program.

Financial Resources ($ dollars)
2015-16
Main Estimates
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
30,000,919 34,682,935 34,642,625 34,642,688
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
344 344 344

The Planned Spending for the International Collaboration and Technical Agreements Program remains stable from 2015-16 to 2017-18.

Table 2-4a: Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Canadian interests are reflected in science-based international rules, standards, free trade agreements, and technical arrangements through effective participation in sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) negotiations and International standards setting bodies (ISSB) such as Codex, OIE, and IPPC Number of key sanitary and phytosanitary negotiations and international standards setting bodies meetings where the CFIA promoted Canada's interests 36 31 March 2016
International markets are accessible to Canadian food, animals, plants, and their products Number of unjustified non- tariff barriers resolved 45 31 March 2016
International regulatory cooperation, relationship building and technical assistance activities that are in line with the CFIA's mandate Number of senior level CFIA-led committees with foreign regulatory counterparts 4 31 March 2016
Number of CFIA-led technical assistance activities provided to foreign national governments 8 31 March 2016
Planning Highlights

As Canada's largest science-based regulatory agency, the CFIA is an active participant in the development of international rules and standards for food safety, animal and plant resources health. The CFIA will continue to lead Canada's participation in the World Trade Organization Sanitary and Phytosanitary (SPS) Committee, the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), the International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC), the North American Plant Protection Organization (NAPPO) and will continue to partner with Health Canada at Codex Alimentarius.

Through these engagements, Canada influences the development of rules and standards that are consistent with Canada's needs and objectives, and encourages harmonization on matters related to food safety, plant resources, animal health and zoonotics, and consumer protection. Engagement approaches include formal bilateral mechanisms established under international agreements and arrangements, ad hoc mechanisms, and technical cooperation activities. In addition, Canada promotes its regulatory approaches, encourages the adoption of risk and science-based regulations and associated best practices on a global level.

For example, the CFIA will collaborate with other government departments to:

  • Expand markets for shellfish (Mexico and Chile) and meat (Brazil and Argentina)
  • Renew trade arrangements for shellfish from Korea

The CFIA will continue to engage and cooperate with international regulatory counterparts in like-minded and emerging economies (e.g., US, European Union (EU), China, India) in order to strengthen and expand partnerships to:

  • Help manage risks before they arrive at the Canadian border, and
  • Share/learn best regulatory practices and strengthen capacity in the international regulatory framework to achieve food safety, animal health and plant health objectives.

The CFIA will continue engagement with the U.S. under the Regulatory Cooperation Council (RCC) and the Beyond the Border (BtB) initiative to contribute to a greater alignment of regulatory approaches while maintaining high standards for food safety, animal health and plant health. In 2015-2016, the CFIA will focus on completing existing initiatives, examining permanent alignment mechanisms through cooperative arrangements with the United States.

Key initiatives include:

  • Continuing work on cooperation and coordination on meat inspection and certification to ensure the safety of meat imports from the United States while reducing the administrative burden for business
  • Development of a two-year implementation and outreach plan on a wood packaging project under the RCC which better ensures predictability to the implementation between the two countries.
  • Cooperation on systems recognition for shellfish to protect Canadians from the health risks associated with the consumption of contaminated bivalve molluscan shellfish (for example, mussels, oysters and clams) and providing technical assistance to resolve trade disruptions where possible.

As part of the Safe Food for Canadians Action Plan, the CFIA is developing a policy to guide the determination and application of foreign system recognition and equivalency agreements.

The CFIA will also continue to actively promote the Canadian science-based regulatory system with counterparts in key trading countries and enter into negotiations, to resolve scientific and technical issues and to support greater market access for the Canadian agriculture industry.

Internal Services

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. Internal services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization, and not those provided to a specific program. The groups of activities are Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Financial Resources ($ dollars)
2015-16
Main Estimates
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
115,329,152 115,750,051 113,472,070 111,889,951
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
749 749 749

The Planned Spending for the Internal Services decreases by $3.8 million from 2015-16 to 2017-18, while FTEs remain stable. The funding decrease is mainly related to the sunsetting of internal support resources for various initiatives and an ongoing transfer of resources to Public Works and Government Services Canada for the consolidation of federal government pay services.

Planning Highlights

Assets and Acquired Services

Agency Transformation will affect how the CFIA delivers services and interacts with stakeholders. Investment Planning (IP) and Governance Oversight will help ensure all investments contribute directly to the Agency's future vision.

In 2015-16, IP will implement recommendations of an internal audit that commenced in April 2014. The focus of the audit was to provide assurance that a management control framework is in place to effectively support integrated investment planning in a manner that is compliant with applicable Government of Canada requirements.

The Government of Canada Web Renewal Initiative is a government-wide priority which will see all departmental and agency websites consolidated into fewer than six Government of Canada websites. The flagship Canada.ca website was launched in December 2013 and the content migration completion deadline of all website information is December 2016.

The CFIA's transparency agenda is part of the CFIA's ongoing transformation to be more service-oriented, responsive and accountable organization and aligns with the new requirements under Open Government and organizational changes under Agency Transformation. In 2015-2016 the Agency will review its own experience and key considerations to develop an approach for its next phase of Transparency.

This will include:

  • Considering the approaches taken by its international partners and aligning CFIA's practices with international standards.
  • Engaging and consulting with stakeholders on the Agency's approach to transparency and Open Government.

The CFIA will increase project management awareness and maturity across the agency to further develop current practices and disciplines. The continued evolution of project management in the Agency will further improve CFIA's Organizational Project Management Capacity Assessment rating.

IP and the Enterprise Project Management Office (ePMO) will expand project management training to include a course specific to CFIA Executives. It will also be completing a full review and release of the Enterprise Project Management Framework (ePMF).

The CFIA is a voluntary participant in the 2013-2016 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS). Details on the Agency's activities in this area can be found in the Greening Government Operations Supplementary Information Table in Section 3.2 of the Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPP).

The CFIA contributes to the FSDS's Theme IV (Greening Government Operations) targets through the Internal Services Program. The Agency plans to:

  • Reduce the departmental greenhouse gas emissions of its fleet by 13% below 2005 levels by 2020; and
  • Continue to embed environmental considerations into public procurement, in accordance with the Federal Policy on Green Procurement.

People Management

The Human Resource (HR) Framework is a complete re-tooling of the HR model, away from a traditional, industrial model to a modern, competency-based framework required for inspection modernization to succeed.

The CFIA's Office of the Staffing Ombudsman will be an important source of identifying potential opportunities for improvement within the Agency's staffing regime.

In 2015-16, as part of its contribution to Agency Transformation agenda, the HR Branch will place emphasis on classification reform, negotiation of new collective agreements and training in support of new food safety regulations.

IM/IT

CFIA is in one of its most transformative periods since its inception. Among its many transformation initiatives, the CFIA has committed to delivering an Improved Food Inspection Model and a new Electronic Service Delivery Platform (ESDP). The sheer scope of transformational changes to CFIA's business requires an integrated, scalable, reliable and secure information and technology environment.

CFIA will be modernizing applications to support the transformation agenda, as well as implement an Application Portfolio Management (APM) Program to move the Agency toward a balanced and sustainable technology platform, architected on Government of Canada (GoC) standards.

Security Management

The threat posed by diseases, pest and invasive alien species continues to evolve due to increased urbanization, terrorism and the global movement of people, animals, plants and goods. With consumers having access to foods from all over the world, risks from food-borne illness are also greater. A robust emergency management program is essential to meet the challenges in this ever-evolving environment.

The CFIA will continue to align its emergency plans for prevention/mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery with its business transformation processes. In addition, the CFIA will regularly update plans to reflect changes and find efficiencies. This will allow the Agency to maintain essential business functions during emergencies.

Section III: Supplementary Information

Future-Oriented Statement of Operations

The future-oriented condensed statement of operations provides a general overview of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's operations. The forecast of financial information on expenses and revenues is prepared on an accrual accounting basis to strengthen accountability and to improve transparency and financial management.

Because the future-oriented condensed statement of operations is prepared on an accrual accounting basis, and the forecast and planned spending amounts presented in other sections of the Report on Plans and Priorities are prepared on an expenditure basis, amounts differ.

A more detailed future-oriented statement of operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net cost of operations to the requested authorities, can be found on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's website.

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations
For the Year Ended March 31 (dollars)
Financial information 2014-15
Estimated Results
2015-16
Planned Results
Difference
Total expenses 833,280 828,095 (5,185)
Total revenues 54,755 54,298 (457)
Net cost of operations 778,525 773,797 (4,728)

The estimated results for fiscal year 2014-15 and planned results for fiscal year 2015-16 are fairly constant. The variance noted in the expenses is mainly explained by the differences in the statutory authority compensation payments between years. The other important transactions taking place in 2014-15, like the severance benefits cash out and the retroactive salary payments, do not impact the accrual accounting expenditures of the Agency for that year since they have already been accrued in past fiscal years. Please note that the severance cash out forecasted amount reflected in the Future-Oriented Statement of Operations is based on the current CFIA payroll situation as well as assumptions from the Office of the Chief Actuary of Canada and the Treasury Board of Canada. Also considered in this report is the payment in arrears implementation by the Government of Canada. The accounting treatment of this transaction impacted the Agency's appropriation but not the expenses.

Supplementary Information Tables

The supplementary information tables listed in the 2015-16 Report on Plans and Priorities can be found on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's website.

  • Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy;
  • Disclosure of Transfer Payments Programs Under $5 Million;
  • Horizontal Initiatives;
  • Upcoming Internal Audits and Evaluations over the next three fiscal years; and
  • User Fees.

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

1. Overview of the Federal Government's Approach to Sustainable Development

The Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) 2013–16 guides the Government of Canada's sustainable development activities, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act. In keeping with the objectives of the Act to make environmental decision making more transparent and accountable to Parliament, the CFIA supports the implementation of the FSDS through the activities in this supplementary information table.

The CFIA contributes to Theme III – Protecting Nature and Canadians, and Theme IV - Shrinking the Environmental Footprint – Beginning with Government.

2. Themes I to III: Department and Agency-Led Targets

Not applicable for CFIA

3. Themes I to III: Implementation Strategies

CFIA participates in six implementation strategies through ongoing activities in its Plant Resources Program (PAA 2.1.3.) and Plant Protection Sub-Program (PAA 2.1.3.1.).

The implementation strategies support the FSDS Theme III Target 4.6: Invasive Alien Species (By 2020, pathways of invasive alien species introductions are identified, and risk-based intervention or management plans are in place for priority pathways and species) in Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians.

Applicable CFIA Implementation Strategies:

  • 4.6.2 Implement activities and strategic objectives with a focus on preventing and limiting new invasive species from entering Canada so that entry and domestic spread of invasive plants and plant pests is managed and response to invasive plants and plant pests is planned and implemented.
    • Performance indicators: Activities to implement the Invasive Alien Species Strategy for Canada (2004) as it relates to preventing the introduction of new and emerging invasive plants and plant pests.
    • Expected results: Programs and policies related to the practical prevention, early detection, and management of activities identified within the Strategy and the Plant Protection mandate are implemented.
  • 4.6.7 Develop and implement a risk analysis framework (i.e., risk assessment, risk management and risk communication) and a pathways approach in regulating invasive alien species in Canada so that entry and domestic spread of invasive plants and plant pests is managed and response to invasive plants and plant pests is planned and implemented.
    • Performance indicators: Develop risk assessments, risk management documents, fact sheets, and risk categorizations annually.
    • Expected results: Identify high-risk invasive species and their pathways by implementing a science-based risk analysis framework. Develop tools and capabilities for modeling of pest risk and spread, and facilitate identification-sharing among federal and provincial partners to ensure efficient information generation, communication and response to new invasive species.
  • 4.6.8 Engage in partnerships with provincial governments, industry, and stakeholders in responding to invasive species within Canada in order increase stakeholder and partner cooperation, stakeholder and partner awareness of plants and plant pests, and compliance with policies and regulations.
    • Performance indicators: Partnership with provincial invasive species councils as well as with agricultural, forestry and horticultural stakeholders. Consultations with Canadians on regulatory options and decisions through tools such as Risk Management Documents.
    • Expected results: Increased engagement and cooperation to ensure transparent decision making in response to invasive alien species in Canada. Information sharing among federal departments is facilitated and scientific tools and expertise are developed. and provide Support and training is provided to partners on how to conduct a risk assessment and in developing risk analysis frameworks.
  • 4.6.9 In collaboration with Transport Canada (TC), cooperate with U.S. and international regulators to inspect vessels to ensure compliance with Canadian regulations.
    • Performance indicators: Under the Asian Gypsy Moth (AGM) program, data collected on the inspection of vessels and compliance rates based on requirements under the Plant Protection Act.
    • Expected results: Maintain collaboration with the US under the AGM Vessel Certification Program to prevent the introduction of the AGM by mitigating the risk of introduction at its origin. Other countries are engaged to explore the expansion of the AGM vessel certification program.
  • 4.6.10 Collaborate with Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) to prevent the introduction and rapid dispersal of invasive species and disease into Canada via land, air and marine ports of entry, thus reducing potential deleterious effects to ecosystems, economies and society.
    • Performance indicators: Refine and implement the invasive plants program and the AGM vessel certification program through the adoption of the policies on phytosanitary requirements to prevent the introduction of regulated pests in Canada.
    • Expected results: The introduction and spread of invasive species into Canada is prevented through inspections at marine ports of entry under the AGM Program as well as airport and post office inspections for other invasive pests.
  • 4.6.11 Foster international, national and provincial collaborative arrangements and partnerships with industry to prevent and limit the introduction of invasive species entering Canada. This will increase stakeholder and partner cooperation, awareness of plants and plant pests, and compliance with policies and regulations. This will also increase international engagement, cooperation and awareness of invasive species and compliance with policies and regulations, ensuring that international standards and processes reflect Canadian interests.
    • Performance indicators: Collaboration with stakeholders, governments and industry to foster a greater awareness of invasive species, their pathways of introduction, and the CFIA's policies and programs and promotion of compliance with Canada's phytosanitary requirements.
    • Expected results: Risks to Canada's plant resource base from imported plants and plant products are mitigated.
4. Theme IV: Targets and Implementation Strategies
Goal 6: Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions and Energy
Target 6.1: GHG Emissions Reduction
The Government of Canada will reduce greenhouse gas emissions from its buildings and fleets by 17% below 2005 levels by 2020.
Departmental Target: 13% below 2005 by 2020
Performance Measurement
Expected result
Reduce the carbon footprint and energy consumption of federal operations.
Performance Indicator Performance Target
GHG emissions (kt CO2 equivalent) in fiscal year 2005-2006 6.43 kt
GHG emissions (kt CO2 equivalent) in current fiscal year FY 2015-2016 5.69 kt
FY 2016-2017 5.69 kt
Percentage change in GHG emissions from fiscal year 2005-2006 to the current fiscal year FY 2015-2016 13% decrease
FY 2016-2017 13% decrease
Adjustments made to base year GHG emissions (indicate if not applicable) N/A
Goal 7: Waste and Asset Management
Target 7.2: Green Procurement
As of April 1, 2014, the Government of Canada will continue to take action to embed environmental considerations into public procurement, in accordance with the federal Policy on Green Procurement.
Performance Measurement
Expected result
Environmentally responsible acquisition, use and disposal of goods and services.
Performance Indicator Performance Target
Departmental approach to further the implementation of the Policy on Green Procurement in place.

Target = Planned completion date March 31, 2015

Strategies/Comments
By March 31, 2015, the CFIA will update its contracting directive to make procuring goods and services from the Certified Green Suppliers List a priority.

Percentage of new specialists in procurement and/or materiel management who have completed the Canada School of Public Service Green Procurement course or equivalent, in the given fiscal year.

Target = 100%

Strategies/Comments
Materiel managers and procurement personnel are identified only as those who work in CFIA's Contracting and Procurement Policy Division. Data is collected manually from Procurement data.

Percentage of identified managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel whose performance evaluation includes support and contribution towards green procurement, in the given fiscal year.

Target = 100%

Strategies/Comments
The number of identified positions is three; two procurement managers and the fleet manager. The requirement will be added in the identified employees' annual Talent Management Questionnaire.

Departmental green procurement target
By March 31, 2017, 90% of vehicles purchased annually are from the Pre-Authorized Vehicle List (PAVL).
Performance Indicator Performance Target
Number of vehicles purchased from the PAVL, relative to the number of vehicles purchased in each fiscal year.

80% by 2015-2016
90% by 2016-2017

Strategies/Comments
The target does not include farm equipment, boats, ATVs or snowmobiles. The tracking for this target is done through a consolidated acquisition spreadsheet. The PAVL is distributed via email to all stakeholders every year in advance of vehicle procurement.

This self-selected target is SMART:

  • Specific: Well defined achievement level of 90%
  • Measurable: Allows comparison over time
  • Achievable: Tools are in place to achieve result
  • Relevant: The CFIA develops a PAVL every year based on vehicles that are the most fuel efficient in their class in the Government Motor Vehicle Ordering Guide.
  • Time-bound: Date established for target implementation
Departmental green procurement target
By March 31, 2017, the CFIA will utilize green consolidated procurement instruments for 95% of its computers procured in each fiscal year.
Performance Indicator Performance Target
Number of computers procured where green consolidated procurement instruments were used, relative to the total number of computers procured in each fiscal year.

85% by 2015-2016
95% by 2016-2017

Strategies/Comments
The target only includes computers procured by CFIA's Procurement and Contracting Service Centre. Data is gathered manually from procurement records. This target excludes any procurement of specialized/technical equipment where green instruments are not available. Computers are defined as the CPUs of PCs, as these have the most green procurement opportunities.

This self-selected target is SMART:

  • Specific: Well defined achievement level of 95%
  • Measurable: Allows comparison over time
  • Achievable: Tools are in place to achieve result
  • Relevant: CFIA procures a significant amount of computers and using green procurement instruments will reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions
  • Time-bound: Date established for target implementation
Departmental green procurement target
By March 31, 2017, the CFIA will utilize green consolidated procurement instruments for 95% of its photocopiers and printers procured in each fiscal year.
Performance Indicator Performance Target
Number of photocopiers and printers procured where green consolidated procurement instruments were used, relative to the total number of photocopiers and printers procured in each fiscal year.

85% by 2015-2016
95% by 2016-2017

Strategies/Comments
The target only includes photocopiers and printers procured or leased by CFIA's Procurement and Contracting Service Centre. Data is gathered manually from procurement records. This target excludes any procurement of specialized/technical equipment where green products are not available.

This self-selected target is SMART:

  • Specific: Well defined achievement level of 95%
  • Measurable: Allows comparison over time
  • Achievable: Tools are in place to achieve result
  • Relevant: CFIA procures a significant amount of photocopiers and printers and using green procurement instruments will reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions
  • Time-bound: Date established for target implementation
Implementation Strategy Element or Best Practice Performance Target

7.2.1.5. Leverage common use procurement instruments where available and feasible.

50% by 2015-2016
75% by 2016-2017

Strategies/Comments
By March 31, 2017, 75% of all Call-ups for goods issued by the National Procurement and Contracting Service Centre will use Green Standing Offers where available or feasible.

Best Practice
7.2.3. Train acquisition cardholders on green procurement.

Achieved 100% since 2012

Strategies/Comments
As of March 2012, all new CFIA acquisition cardholders will complete the Canada School of Public Service online course on green procurement. Data is collected manually from Finance data. CFIA has a process in place to ensure that all new AC Cardholders take the Green Procurement Course prior to receiving their AC card.

5. Additional Departmental Sustainable Development Activities and Initiatives

Not applicable for CFIA

6. Sustainable Development Management System

Not applicable for CFIA

7. Strategic Environmental Assessment

The CFIA ensures that its decision-making process includes a consideration of the FSDS goals and targets through the strategic environmental assessment (SEA). An SEA for policy, plan or program proposals includes and analysis of the impacts of the proposal on the environment, including on the FSDS goals and targets. The results of SEAs are made public when an initiative is announced or approved, demonstrating that environmental factors were integrated into the decision-making process.

Disclosure of Transfer Payment Programs Under $5 Million

Name of Transfer Payment Program (S) Compensation payments in accordance with requirements established by Regulations under the Health of Animals Act and the Plant Protection Act, and authorized pursuant to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act (S.C., 1997, c.6) - Statutory
End Date Ongoing
Type of Transfer Payment Contribution
Main Objective To compensate Canadians, in accordance with the appropriate regulations, for plants or animals ordered destroyed for the purpose of disease control.
Link to Department's Program Alignment Architecture Program 1.2: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

Terrestrial Animal Health Sub-Program

$2,300,000

Aquatic Animal Health Sub-Program

$900,000
Program 1.3: Plant Resources Program

Plant Protection Sub-Program

$300,000
Planned Spending for 2015-16 $3,500,000
Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation N/A
General Targeted Recipient Groups Canadians who have had animals ordered destroyed for the purpose of disease control.
Canadians who have had plants ordered destroyed for the purpose of disease control.
Name of Transfer Payment Program Federal Assistance Program (FAP) - Voted
End Date Ongoing
Type of Transfer Payment Contribution
Main Objective The FAP supports projects and initiatives that advance the CFIA's strategic outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.
Link to Department's Program Alignment Architecture Program 1.2: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

Terrestrial Animal Health Sub-Program

$98,200

Aquatic Animal Health Sub-Program

$39,400

Feed

$15,000
Program 1.4: International Collaboration and Technical Agreements $666,400
Planned Spending for 2015-16 $819,000
Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation 2010-11
General Targeted Recipient Groups Eligible recipients include those whose goals and objectives are complementary to and supportive of the CFIA's mission and strategic outcome. This includes individuals, groups of individuals, agriculture and commodity organizations and conservation districts.

Horizontal Initiatives

General Information
Name of horizontal initiative Renewal of Government Response and Action Plan to the 2008 Listeriosis Outbreak
Name of lead department(s) Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)
Federal partner organization(s) Health Canada (HC); and the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC).
Non-federal and non-governmental partner(s) Not Applicable
Start date of the horizontal initiative 2012-13
End date of the horizontal initiative 2015-16 (CFIA); 2016-17 and ongoing (HC and PHAC)
Total federal funding allocated (start to end date) $112,900,000 (2012-13 to 2016 17) and $10,500,000 ongoing (HC and PHAC)
Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners Not Applicable
Description of the horizontal initiative The objective of this horizontal initiative is to continue to enhance the Government of Canada's ability to prevent, detect and respond to outbreaks of foodborne illnesses, pursuant to recommendations stemming from reviews of the 2008 listeriosis outbreak.

The three federal organizations, the CFIA, HC, and PHAC, received a total spending authority of $112.9 million for this initiative (CFIA: $60.4 million over four years, PHAC: $33 million over five years, and HC: $19.5 million over five years). PHAC and HC also received a total spending authority of $10.5 million ongoing ($6.6 million and $3.9 million respectively). Each federal organization identified the resource requirements, strategic outcomes, objectives, and implementation plan for each program area.

Shared outcome(s) Address Immediate Food Safety Risks by maintaining:
  • hired ready-to-eat meat inspection staff;
  • scientific and technical training programs for inspection staff;
  • technical support to continue enhanced connectivity for inspectors;
  • enhanced food safety program risk management; and
  • capacity for the increasing number and complexity of health risk assessments.

Enhanced Surveillance and Early Detection by maintaining:

  • capacity to improve and validate test detection methods for Listeria;
  • scientific capacity to continue additional Listeria testing;
  • ability to develop and improve test detection methods for Listeria and other foodborne hazards;
  • national public health surveillance tools and platforms through the expansion of the FoodNet Canada (formerly C-EnterNet) Program; and
  • strengthened laboratory diagnostic and networking tools: continued implementation of whole genome sequencing; continued expansion of PulseNet Canada.

Improved Government Response to Foodborne Illness Outbreaks in Canada by maintaining:

  • support to the Food Safety Portal;
  • risk communication and social marketing strategies;
  • human illness outbreak response capacity; and
  • national epidemiological surge public health outbreak capacity.
Governance structures The CFIA, HC and PHAC currently work horizontally in delivering their shared food safety mandates. Pursuant to existing trilateral memoranda of understanding, the three partners meet regularly to discuss food safety issues of mutual concern. This governance framework includes Deputy Head, Assistant Deputy Minister, and Director General level committees, which meet regularly to discuss and plan approaches for addressing joint food safety issues. The work of the committees is also informed by the F/P/T Ministers of Health and Agriculture and their associated discussions on food safety.

In October 2013, the CFIA joined Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada in reporting to the Honourable Rona Ambrose, Minister of Health. This reorganization has strengthened Canada's food safety system by bringing all three authorities responsible for food safety under one Minister. This will ensure clear focus, easy collaboration and timely communications with Canadians in relation to food safety.

Planning highlights The CFIA, HC and the PHAC have acted on all of the recommendations put forward by the Independent Investigator. Organizations have achieved considerable success in carrying out the Government's 2009 action plan in response to the 2008 listeriosis outbreak. Sustained effort on critical activities regarding human resources, scientific capacity and communications will maintain this strengthened food safety system.
Results to be achieved by non-federal and non-governmental partners Not Applicable
Contact information

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Tony Ritchie
Executive Director
Strategic Policy and International Affairs Directorate
613- 773-5867

Health Canada
Diana Dowthwaite
Director General, Resource Management & Operations Directorate,
Health Products and Food Branch,
613- 957-6690

Public Health Agency of Canada
Steven Stemthal
Director General
Centre for Food-borne, Environmental and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases
Infectious Disease Prevention and Control Branch
613- 948-6883

Planning Information
Federal Partner Link to departmental Program Alignment Architectures Contributing programs and activities Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 2015–16 Planned Spending 2015–16 Expected Results (ER) 2015–16 Targets (T)
Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) Food Safety Program

Internal Services
Maintaining hired inspection staff in ready-to-eat meat establishments 29,104,000
(2012-13 to 2015-16)
7,276,000 ER 1 T 1
Maintaining scientific and technical training programs 14,336,000
(2012-13 to 2015-16)
3,584,000 ER 2 T 2
Maintaining enhanced connectivity for inspectors 2,280,000
(2012-13 to 2015-16)
570,000 ER 3 T 3
Maintaining enhanced food safety program risk management 6,680,000
(2012-13 to 2015-16)
1,670,000 ER 4 T 4
Maintaining capacity to improve test detection methods for Listeria and other foodborne hazards 1,960,000
(2012-13 to 2015-16)
490,000 ER 5 T 5
Maintaining scientific capacity to continue Listeria testing 5,360,000
(2012-13 to 2015-16)
1,340,000 ER 6 T 6
Maintaining support to the Government of Canada Food Safety Portal 680,000
(2012-13 to 2015-16)
170,000 ER 7 T 7
Health Canada (HC) Food Safety and Nutrition Maintain ability to respond within established service standards to the increasing number and complexity of health risk assessments and food safety investigations 13,500,000
(2012-13 to 2016-17)
and
2,700,000 ongoing
2,700,000 ER 8 T 8
Maintaining ability to develop and improve test detection methods for Listeria and other foodborne hazards 3,000,000
(2012-13 to 2016-17)
and
600,000 ongoing
600,000 ER 9 T 9
Maintaining a Social Marketing Strategy 3,000,000
(2012-13 to 2016-17)
and
600,000 ongoing
600,000 ER 10 T 10
Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) Health Promotion and Disease Prevention; Public Health Infrastructure Maintain national public health surveillance tools and platforms through the expansion of the FoodNet Canada program 7,929,923
(2012-13 to 2016-17)
and
1,585,679 ongoing
1,521,344 ER 11 T 11
Public Health Infrastructure Maintain strengthened laboratory diagnostic and networking tools: Continued implementation of whole genome sequencing 4,471,260
(2012-13 to 2016-17)
and
894,252 ongoing
926,048 ER 12 T 12
Public Health Infrastructure Maintain strengthened laboratory diagnostic and networking tools: Continued expansion of PulseNet Canada 1,852,105
(2012-13 to 2016-17)
and
370,421 ongoing
380,304 ER 13 T 13
Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Maintain human illness outbreak response capacity 14,525,824
(2012-13 to 2016-17)
and
2,908,774 ongoing
2,847,174 ER 14 T 14
Health Promotion and Disease Prevention; Health Security; Public Health Infrastructure Maintain national epidemiological surge public health outbreak capacity 4,220,888
(2012-13 to 2016-17)
and
840,874 ongoing
694,727 ER 15 T 15
Total for All Federal Partners $112,900,000
(2012-17) and $10,500,000
ongoing (HC and PHAC)
25,369,597 Not applicable
ER 1: Maintaining Hired Inspection Staff in Ready-to-Eat Meat Establishments:

Outcome: Improved management of food safety risks in federally registered ready-to-eat meat establishments.

Output/Activities: Maintain additional inspection capacity in order to continue delivering enhanced verification and inspection activities resulting from the mandatory Listeria testing and reporting requirements for federally registered ready-to-eat meat establishments.

T 1: Targets: Number of inspectors maintained, percentage of delivered tasks related to Listeria controls and sampling that were found to be acceptable.

ER 2: Maintaining Scientific and Technical Training Programs:

Outcome: Improved management of food safety risks in federally registered ready-to-eat meat establishments.

Output/Activities: Continue to develop and deliver enhanced scientific and technical training programs to ensure that new and existing ready-to-eat meat products inspection staff are aware of the latest trends in science and technology related to meat processing and of updated policies.

T 2: Targets:

  • Number of training sessions delivered,
  • Number of inspectors trained, number of person days for this training.
ER 3: Maintaining Enhanced Connectivity for Inspectors:

Outcome: Improved management of food safety risks.

Output/Activities: Continue to provide frontline inspection staff with the ability to securely access the CFIA's network and applications through high speed internet connectivity.

T 3: Targets:

  • Number of inspectors with high-speed access.
  • average amount of data used per aircard.
ER 4: Maintaining Enhanced Food Safety Program Risk Management:

Outcome: Improved management of food safety risks through the continued review of food safety programs and activities.

Output/Activities: Continue to modernize food safety standards, programs, policies and operational procedures to make them consistent and reflect current trends (e.g. rapid technological and scientific advancements in food production).

T 4: Targets: List of reviews/updates/projects completed (e.g. risk-based sampling plans).

ER 5: Maintaining Capacity to Improve Test Detection Methods for Listeria and other Foodborne Hazards:

Outcome: Improved management of food safety risks through improved detection methods for Listeria and other foodborne hazards.

Output/Activities: Continue to provide greater availability and choice of testing methods for the detection of Listeria by industry and the CFIA, and faster turnaround time for reporting results.

T 5: Targets:

  • Completion of the validation protocol.
  • completion of the validation project, technical review of validation project data.
  • decisions made on new methods.
ER 6: Maintaining Scientific Capacity to Continue Additional Listeria Testing:

Outcome: Early detection and faster response to potential foodborne illness outbreaks through enhanced laboratory testing capacity, contributing to improved decision-making.

Output/Activities: Continue early warning of potential contamination in the food processing environment.

T 6: Targets:

  • Number of product and environmental samples submitted to labs for Listeria versus 2008 baseline.
  • reports produced on data trends at a defined frequency.
  • number of experts dedicated to trend analysis.
ER 7: Maintaining Support to the Government of Canada Food Safety Portal:

Outcome: Canadians are aware of food safety risks, and they contribute to the management thereof by sourcing their food safety information via several on-line Government of Canada resources.

Output/Activities: Continue to improve public access to integrated Government of Canada food safety information.

Please note: In fiscal 2014-15, the CFIA introduced a new interactive web-based tool for consumers that provides easy-to-understand and relevant information on how to read a food label. A new online tool for industry, which provides clear guidance on labelling rules, was also developed. The CFIA also continues to post food safety information and food recalls on a variety of websites and through several distribution channels in order to reach consumers. However, with a Web Renewal Initiative underway, all Government of Canada websites are being consolidated into a single site (Canada.ca). With this change, the Food Safety Portal will no longer be permitted as a stand-alone site and will be replaced by the Health Theme of Canada.ca. The CFIA has been active in the Web Renewal Initiative and will be migrating the information on the Food Safety Portal such as the list of food recalls to Canada.ca and closing the portal by December 2016 in accordance with the TBS mandate for web renewal.

T 7: Targets:

  • Number of visitors and visits to food safety information on the inspection.gc.ca site (until December 2016 when food safety content will be posted on Canada.ca).
  • Number of followers and tweets distributed through the CFIA Food safety Twitter account.
  • Number of food safety related CFIA Facebook postings.
ER 8: Maintaining ability to respond within established service standards to the increasing number and complexity of health risk assessments and food safety investigations:

Outcome: Improved management of food safety risks.

Output/Activities: Provide risk assessments, based on the best available science and methods, within established service standards and strengthen the prevention of and response to food safety incidents.

T 8: Targets:

  • Number of staffing actions (hired/allocated) and level of funding allocated over time, specifically targeting the enhancement of our capacity for HRAs. Hire four new staff members in 2013-14.
  • Maintenance of FTEs to support HRA activities.
  • Number of HRAs completed within service standards.
  • Number of quality management practices implemented, including SOPs, templates, and inter-departmental HC-CFIA protocols.
  • National and international collaborations conducted related to risk modelling method development, refinement, testing, validation, and implementation.
ER 9: Maintaining ability to develop and improve test detection methods for Listeria and other foodborne hazards:

Outcome: Improve test detection methods for foodborne hazards.

Output/Activities: Have a suite of rapid validated tools available to industry and government partners to allow action to be taken at the earliest opportunity, thereby reducing exposure of Canadians to foodborne hazards.

T 9: Targets:

  • Risk assessment modelling methods and IT tools that are current, accepted, validated, and meet international standards.
  • Number of improved test detection methods and other laboratory diagnostic tools developed for faster detection of Listeria and other hazards in foods.
  • Establishment of the Chemical Methods Committee and Compendium of Methods for the Chemical Analysis of Foods.
  • Number of validated methods published in Compendium of Analytical Methods or the Compendium of Methods for the Chemical Analysis of Food.
  • Number of FTEs hired/allocated to developing/improving microbiological and chemical methods.
  • Establishment of service standards and protocols for publishing microbiological or chemical methods according to the Microbiological Methods Committee (MMC) and Chemical Methods Committee (RCMC).
  • Establishment and description of criteria and processes to identify priority methods for validation by HC and CFIA according to the MMC and RCMC.
  • Number of methods prioritized for fast tracking and validation by MMC and RCMC.
  • Number of completed pilots and validated methodologies/prototypes for the detection of Listeria and other hazards in foods.
ER 10: Maintaining a Social Marketing Strategy:

Outcome: Canadians are aware of and contribute to the management of food safety risks.

Output/Activities: Continue to increase awareness and knowledge of the health risks associated with unsafe food handling practices and foodborne illness among vulnerable populations through the use of multi-faceted activities.

T 10: Targets:

  • Establishment of strategic partnerships to expand the reach of messaging;
  • Breadth of food safety marketing campaign activities and products;
  • Web tracking statistics.
ER 11: Maintaining national public health surveillance tools and platforms through the expansion of the FoodNet Canada program:

Outcome: Enhanced foodborne disease surveillance.

Output/Activities: Improved surveillance tools through the expansion of FoodNet Canada (formerly C-Enternet) to include at least three functional sentinel sites in Canada.

T 11: Targets:

  • Steady state achieved. Test results acquired in all three sites for all four components (human, retail products including imported products, farm commodities and water).
  • Sampling conducted for all planned commodities in all three sites. Integrated analysis conducted for the Annual Report including all four components from all three sites.
  • Contracts and agreements confirmed for all four components in all three sites.
ER 12: Maintaining strengthened laboratory diagnostic and networking tools: Continued implementation of whole genome sequencing:

Outcome: Canada's ability to rapidly detect and trace the origins of food hazards is enhanced.

Output/Activities: Modern genomic technologies will continue to be implemented to provide substantially more detailed information and evidence on foodborne pathogens during outbreak investigations. This will be done according to the roadmap that has been developed for the implementation of genomic epidemiology in PulseNet Canada.

T 12: Targets: Progress in the completion of PulseNet Canada Genome roadmap implementation, including the completion of sequencing 1000 retrospective priority pathogen isolates and pilot projects that utilize whole genome sequencing for outbreak response in real time.

ER 13: Maintaining strengthened laboratory diagnostic and networking tools: Continued expansion of PulseNet Canada:

Outcome: Canada's ability to rapidly detect and trace the origins of food hazards is enhanced.

Output/Activities: The expansion of the PulseNet Canada laboratory network will increase outbreak detection capacity and information sharing amongst F/P/T partner laboratories.

T 13: Targets:

  • Development and delivery of new training and knowledge translation materials to support the expansion of the network including genomic epidemiology materials.
  • Expanding operations and the supporting MOU to include additional tests (including Comparative Genomic Fingerprinting, whole genome sequencing).
  • Accreditation of and publishing interpretation criteria for Multiple-Locus Variable Number Tandem Repeat Analysis (MLVA) (E. coli O157:H7).
ER 14: Maintaining human illness outbreak response capacity:

Outcome: Enhanced effectiveness and efficiency of response activities, as well as improved coordination and capacity to respond to multi-jurisdictional foodborne illness outbreaks.

Output/Activities: Maintenance of protocols to ensure awareness of processes, roles and responsibilities of Federal, Provincial and Territorial partners; % of relevant Health Portfolio staff utilizing communication platform and Toolkit prototype; timely implementation of analytical studies when identifying source of a food-borne illness outbreak.

T 14: Targets:

  • Completion of the Foodborne Illness Outbreak Response Protocol (FIORP 2010) revision.
  • Percentage of developed training modules facilitated to our Federal/Provincial/Territorial partners.
  • Completion of Foodbook: Canadian Food Exposure Study to Strengthen Outbreak response Report and Control Bank.
ER 15: Maintaining national epidemiological surge public health outbreak capacity:

Outcome: Improved coordination and capacity to control and mitigate an outbreak which poses a public health threat to Canadians.

Output/Activities: Efficient and effective federal surge capacity to support outbreak response and mitigate the public health impact of a foodborne illness outbreak.

T 15: Targets:

  • Continue to develop a plan for maintaining Agency surge capacity which includes: recruitment strategy, training strategy (including annual training for new and existing surge staff), and agreed-to competencies;
  • List of staff for surge reviewed and updated; and
  • Number of Directorates participating in the surge (AERO = All Events Response Operations) response requirements.
General Information
Name of horizontal initiative Plum Pox Monitoring and Management Program (PPMMP)
Name of lead department(s) Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)
Federal partner organization(s) Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)
Non-federal and non-governmental partner(s) Not Applicable
Start date of the horizontal initiative 2011-12
End date of the horizontal initiative 2015-16 (CFIA and Agriculture and Agri-food Canada); 2016-17 and ongoing (CFIA)
Total federal funding allocated (start to end date) $17,200,000 (2011-12 to 2015-16) and $1,300,000 ongoing (CFIA)
Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners Not Applicable
Description of the horizontal initiative Plum Pox Virus (PPV) is a viral plant disease that infects Prunus species including peach, plum, apricot and other stone fruit plants. PPV does not affect human or animal health but reduces fruit yields, mottles leaves, and causes visual symptoms on stone fruit, thus reducing their marketability. The virus is spread locally by aphids (insects) and through the movement of infected propagative material, including live trees of all age classes, rootstock, bud wood, cuttings or other green branches and twigs, and tissue cultures.

PPV was first discovered in Ontario and Nova Scotia in 2000. The Government of Canada responded in 2001 with a three-year, $49.3 million PPV program to suppress PPV, and to evaluate the feasibility of eradication. Based on the recommendations of a PPV International Expert Panel, the seven-year Plum Pox Eradication Program (PPEP) was launched in 2004 ($85 million) and augmented in 2007 with an additional $58.6 million totaling $143.6 million in federal and Ontario government funding. The PPEP expired on March 31, 2011.

Eradication of PPV has been achieved in six of the seven quarantine areas established at the beginning of the eradication program. These six quarantine areas are Blenheim, Fonthill, Stoney Creek and Vittoria in Ontario, and the Annapolis Valley and Wolfville in Nova Scotia. Although eradication was not achieved in the remaining quarantine area in Niagara, the infection rate has been reduced from 1.9% of tree samples to less than 0.02% in 2010. The perimeter and a 10 km area around the remaining quarantine area continues to be surveyed and monitored with one detection of PPV in 2013 that resulted in an 800 m extension of the western border of the Niagara quarantine area. By implementing a PPV monitoring and management (PPMMP) strategy, PPV will remain in the Niagara region, and the industry will thus need to manage the risks it poses to the production and marketability of products.

The PPMMP consists of regulatory plant protection activities, and for the first five years of the program, significant research will be carried out to develop PPV risk mitigation tools and educational and awareness program components to build the capacity within the industry to implement best management practices.

CFIA and AAFC funding was obtained from Budget 2011, which allocated $17.2 million over five years for the PPMMP, to transition to a management and monitoring strategy to contain and mitigate the spread of plum pox.

Shared outcome(s) The outcome of the Government's PPMMP is to fulfill the Government of Canada's plant protection obligations and international responsibilities through implementation of measures to mitigate the spread of PPV on a national and international level. The PPMMP's other outcome is to facilitate industry management of PPV.
Governance structures The CFIA's PPMMP activities and deliverables are managed and governed by the Plant Business Line Committee, as PPV is an established, regulated plant pest requiring ongoing decision-making to protect Canada's plant resource base. Also, AAFC's A-Base activities are managed and governed by the Director General (DG) of the Mixed Wood Plains directorate. The DG has the final "sign-off" authority for AAFC Science and Technology Branch activities, including the PPMMP. An AAFC Research Development and Technology (RDT) Director has been assigned as responsible for ensuring that PPV research activities are implemented, managed and reported as required. A PPV Steering Group (PPV-SG), consisting of CFIA and AAFC director-level officials, was established for the first five years to make recommendations about program delivery to the above CFIA and AAFC governance committees. The PPV-SG liaises with internal and external stakeholders as required, including international plant protection bodies, to provide updates and seek input about program and research parameters at stakeholder conferences and meetings. After a period of five years, when AAFC's role in the PPMMP has concluded, the CFIA's Plant Business Line Committee will be responsible for managing the PPMMP on an ongoing basis.
Planning highlights For 2015-16, the key horizontal plans are: implement appropriate sampling and detection of PPV host material to update, as required, the quarantine area boundary; enforce restrictions to mitigate the spread of PPV; and undertake research activities to improve the regulatory program.
Results to be achieved by non-federal and non-governmental partners Not Applicable
Contact information

Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Greg Wolff
Director Plant Protection Division
Plant Health and Biosecurity Directorate
613-773-7181

Patricia McAllister
National Manager – Horticulture
Plant Health and Biosecurity Directorate
613-773-7166

Charlene Green
Horticulture Specialist
Plant Health and Biosecurity Directorate
905-938-8697

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Della Johnston
Director – RDT
Mixed Wood Plains Directorate
519-738-1218

Lorne Stobbs
Research Scientist – Vineland, Ontario
905-562-2037

Aiming Wang
Research Scientist – London, Ontario
519-953-6697

Planning Information
Federal Partner Link to departmental Program Alignment Architectures Contributing programs and activities Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 2015–16 Planned Spending 2015–16 Expected Results (ER) 2015–16 Targets (T)
Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) Plant Resources Program/ Internal Services Monitoring and Detection 4,155,349
(2011-12 to 2015-16)
and
541,009 ongoing
716,485 ER 16 T 16
Regulatory Enforcement 4,588,113
(2011-12 to 2015-16)
and
660,368 ongoing
806,207 ER 17 T 17
PPV Regulatory Research 1,135,095
(2011-12 to 2015-16)
and
98,623 ongoing
121,639 ER 18 T 18
PPV Suppression Research 689,441
(2011-12 to 2015-16)
85,668 ER 19 T 19
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) Science, Innovation and Adoption PPV Regulatory Research 374,643
(2011-12 to 2013-14)
Funds sunsetted in 2014
Virus Resistance Research 2,723,562
(2011-12 to 2015-16)
514,766 ER 20 T 20
PPV Suppression Research 2,471,190
(2011-12 to 2015-16)
390,825 ER 21 T 21
Education and Awareness Activities 261,271
(2011-12 to 2015-16)
23,763 ER 22 T 22
Total for all federal organizations $16,398,664
(2011-12 to 2015-16)
and
$1,300,000 ongoing
$2,659,353 Not applicable

Note: For Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, total allocation and planned spending amounts exclude any indirect costs.

ER 16: Monitoring and Detection:

Outcome: Mitigate the spread of PPV on a national and international level.

Outputs/activities: Monitoring activities will be carried out by the CFIA to confirm and adjust the boundaries of the Niagara quarantine area as necessary. In accordance with NAPPO guidelines, the CFIA will conduct detection activities annually by taking samples along the Niagara quarantine area perimeter. Laboratory testing of the samples to determine the presence of PPV will be conducted by the CFIA. To detect whether PPV has spread beyond the quarantine area, samples will be collected annually in orchards up to 10 km beyond the Niagara quarantine area perimeter.

T 16: Targets: An estimated 22,850 samples will be taken and tested annually until 2015-16 and reduced to 17,000 samples in 2016-17 and onward. Total samples are determined based on sampling protocol which is reviewed annually and actual PPV-susceptible species. Adjustments to quarantine areas and grower/resident plantings influence final sample numbers.

ER 17: Regulatory Enforcement:

Outcome: Mitigate the spread of PPV on a national and international level.

Outputs/activities: Through its inspection activities, the CFIA will monitor and assess regulated parties' compliance with the PPMMP regulatory requirements. Monitoring activities include issuing movement certificates for regulated material (dormant root stock, seedlings, seeds, and plant material for research) and conducting audits and compliance verifications of retail outlets, nurseries and other facilities that may sell or distribute susceptible Prunus species. When non-compliance is identified, the CFIA will take the most appropriate response to obtain compliance in view of factors such as potential or actual harm, the compliance history of the regulated party, and intent.

To help maintain a lower level of virus prevalence within the quarantine area, prohibition and restriction regarding propagation of regulated Prunus plants within the quarantine area will continue. The prohibition on propagation will result in only PPV-free or certified clean stock (planting material that is free of all viruses including PPV) is used within the Niagara quarantine area.

Indicator: Compliance of growers, residents and retailers within the quarantine area with movement restrictions.

T 17: Targets: Annual inspection of a sub-set of growers, residents and retailers to determine if movement of material or propagation has occurred.

ER 18: PPV Regulatory Research:

Outcome: Restrain the prevalence of PPV in the Niagara region, mitigate the spread on a national and international level.

Outputs/activities: To support the clean stock program, a research study is being conducted by the CFIA to develop strategies for eliminating PPV from rootstock. This program supports the enforcement of the propagation prohibition. The most effective method(s) for eliminating PPV from infected nursery stock materials will be evaluated so that desirable foreign varieties may become eligible for use by industry through clean stock services.

Regulatory research will also develop improved detection tools and more extensive knowledge about PPV to support PPV surveillance, monitoring and detection. CFIA research projects include characterizing genetic variation within individual strains of PPV found in Canada, monitoring for the introduction of new strains, and mapping the movement of the virus in Canada.

Beyond 2016, the CFIA will conduct similar research, such as evaluating the host range for newly discovered strains of PPV to determine the range of Prunus hosts to be regulated in Canada. This research will ensure that the ongoing regulatory program remains effective in mitigating the spread of PPV.

The requirement of a comprehensive list of host plants for new strains of PPV detected in Canada is to enhance surveillance protocols and industry awareness.

Indicator: In total, three indicators are identified:

  • protocol for the production of virus-free nursery stock for domestic and export clean stock programs using virus elimination techniques.
  • a genetic map to understand the movement of PPV strains and isolates to allow for continuous improvement of regulatory surveillance protocols;
  • identification of and protocols for the detection of any new strains and isolates of PPV not previously reported in Canada.

T 18: Targets: Development of a protocol for virus elimination. Genetic mapping and identification of new strains are dependent on the number of samples collected that test positive. The list of host plants is variable depending on the identification of new strains and isolates in Canada during routine surveillance activities.

ER 19: PPV Suppression Research:

Outcome: Screening of foreign plant material for pests and diseases and conduct of field pre-evaluations.

Outputs/activities: AAFC will identify foreign varieties with potential resistance to PPV. The CFIA has phytosanitary measures in place to mitigate pest movement into Canada from imported products. The CFIA will screen identified foreign plant material for resistance and hypersensitivity to PPV at the quarantine biocontainment facilities at the CFIA Sidney Laboratory.

Indicator: Plant material identified by AAFC and imported into Canada.

T 19: Targets: Variable, based on the number of identified potential candidate varieties and laboratory capacity.

ER 20: Virus Resistance Research

Outcome: Development of genetic and induced innate resistance in fruit trees to control PPV in Canada.

Outputs/activities: The use of genetic resistance has been demonstrated for a number of crop species to be the most effective and sustainable approach to control viral pathogens as it is environmentally-friendly and provides reliable protection without additional labour or material costs during the growing season. Research is being vigorously carried out to develop virus resistance strategies to help protect against PPV and manage the virus over the long term. Specific research projects to support virus resistance include 1) developing a new PPV-resistant peach tree line through gene manipulation to make susceptible hosts resistant to infection; 2) evaluating transferable resistance in rootstock that can be transmitted through grafting to existing fruit trees; 3) developing a virus vector which will act like a vaccine to induce resistance by gene silencing; 4) introducing and evaluating foreign resistance materials for potential use against PPV in Canada

Indicators: In total, three indicators are identified: 1) at least two genes in stone fruits that can be manipulated against PPV; 2) a protocol for the production of a genetically diverse peach population using tissue culture with a chemical mutagen; 3) a platform for screening for target gene peach variants from the peach population using next generation sequencing; 4) a rootstock that can produce gene silencing signals; 5) transmissible small RNAs in scions; 6) a virus vector that is infectious on stone fruit species with potentiality against PPV; 7) a foreign material resistant to Canadian PPV isolate; 8) a protocol of multiplication of the foreign material using meristem tissues; 9) five year-end reports, 10 meeting abstracts and 10 scientific manuscripts.

T 20: Targets: Development of a peach population for screening for PPV resistance; evaluation of transmissible gene silencing signals against PPV; development of a viral vector against PPV; identification of a foreign material resistant to PPV suitable for use in Canada

ER 21: PPV Suppression Research

Outcomes: Development of recommendations based on scientific studies to further knowledge on the epidemiology of the Dideron strain of PPV in a cool temperate climate, and apply these recommendations towards the development of an integrated disease management program for the industry stakeholders to retrain the spread of PPV and reduce its economic impact.

Outputs/Activities: PPV suppression will be pursued through research to reduce PPV transmission in orchards. Research projects include assessing practices and processes, specifically the use of oil sprays on Prunus plant leaves, to suppress PPV transmission by aphids; evaluating the influence of tree variety and age on the level of seasonal resistance to natural infection by aphids; determining the efficacy of newly registered insecticides on the transmission of PPV, which will result in the development of application guidelines for use by industry; and evaluating foreign material for use in Canada (in collaboration with the CFIA). The impact of PPV infection on tree viability, bud hardiness, crop yield and fruit quality are also being examined.

Indicators: Information from research studies will be collated each year, and a final report prepared at the conclusion of the program. Information from the research will be shared with growers through grower workshops, newsletters and presented at scientific conferences. Indicators include the determination of both the beneficial and adverse effects of oil residue on leaves including ability to detect virus; the determination of whether new insecticides (repellents, antifeedants) have any effect on virus transmission by aphids; the determination of seasonal susceptibility of peach trees to PPV and the effects of the disease on tree growth, winter hardiness, productivity and fruit quality; recommendations on the use of foliar and soil amendments to increase tree field resistance to natural transmission of PPV and improve tree productivity; recommendations on the proper timing and application of oils for optimum protection of trees to natural spread of PPV, in addition to possible interaction of new or currently used pesticides with oil applications.

T 21: Targets: Develop recommendations for the industry on integrated control practices to reduce the spread of PPV in commercial orchards and its impact on production. This will involve recommendations of the types of insecticide/antifeedant, oil applications and correct timing of applications. Information on the impact of PPV on tree productivity, hardiness and fruit quality will be made available to the industry.

ER 22: Education and Awareness Activities

Outcomes: an increased industry understanding and awareness of PPV best management practices along with increased industry uptake of PPV best management practices, which will also help prevent the spread of PPV.

Implementation Plan: Several activities will be conducted to increase industry knowledge and awareness of PPV management practices and to facilitate the transition from eradication to long-term management. These activities will be conducted in collaboration with Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs (OMAFRA), which is responsible for providing PPV management crop advice and training to Ontario growers and nurseries. AAFC will also liaise with the Ontario Tenders Fruit Producers' Marketing Board (OTFPMB) and the Canadian Nursery Landscape Association (CNLA) to develop and promote an effective educational and awareness campaign.

Indicators: AAFC will collaborate with OMAFRA to distribute information to Ontario tender fruit industry members about the PPV best management practices by publishing pamphlets and articles. An AAFC-OMAFRA fact sheet and web postings relating to the management of PPV will provide information on the disease, including symptom recognition, proper use of treatments, virus testing methods, and contact information for service providers. Information will be shared with producers through presentations at grower meetings, conferences, and information sessions. European tender fruit producers and crop advisors who have experience managing the disease will be invited to participate in the conferences, meetings, and information sessions to leverage their expertise. Information and research findings will also be provided by local crop advisors and researchers.

T 22: Targets: Dissemination of information to growers/stakeholders and the scientific community on best management practices to minimize spread of PPV and reduce its impact on production.

General Information
Name of horizontal initiative Food Safety Modernization (FSM)
Name of lead department(s) Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)
Federal partner organization(s) Health Canada
Non-federal and non-governmental partner(s) Not Applicable
Start date of the horizontal initiative 2011-12
End date of the horizontal initiative 2015-16
Total federal funding allocated (start to end date) $67,437,583Table Note 7 (new funding) and $40,000,000 (internal reallocation) (2011-12 to 2015-16)
Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners Not Applicable
Description of the horizontal initiative The CFIA was created in 1997 to enhance food safety systems through the consolidation of inspection and quarantine services that were being delivered by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Health Canada (HC), Fisheries and Oceans Canada, and Industry Canada. The current inspection system comprises numerous independent inspection delivery models.

In Budget 2011, the Government of Canada committed funding amounting to $96.8 million to the CFIA to improve and modernize its food safety inspection system. A number of CFIA initiatives were identified to modernize Canada's food safety inspection system. In support of the Agency's modernization initiatives, HC received $3.0M for enhanced health risk assessment capacity.

The main objectives of this modernization initiative are to move the CFIA away from a system of independent commodity-specific inspection approaches and inspector training, and paper-based record keeping and interactions with stakeholders, to that of a single-inspection approach consistent across the food safety program, supported by standardized training, technology information solutions, enhanced proactive science capacity and improved service to stakeholders.

The plan consists of three elements:

  • inspection system modernization, including the development of an improved inspection model which will provide standardized activities across the food program, national training for inspectors, enhanced Listeria control in high-risk ready-to-eat foods, enhanced HC health risk assessment capacity in support of CFIA modernization activities, and the IM/IT enablement of the integrated Agency inspection model and the export certification process;
  • supporting risk-based decision-making through enhanced scientific capacity, including a proposal for a food laboratory network, enhanced capacity for scientific testing and improved facilities and equipment; and
  • increasing efficiency through improved information management and information technology, including data storage and back-up capacity; enhanced connectivity, and more support for inspector tools such as wireless devices and laptops.
Shared outcome(s) Modernize the CFIA's inspection system by providing up-to-date and relevant training and necessary technology support. This shared outcome will address the increasing complexity of inspection associated with industry advancements in food production and international advancements to improve food safety systems.
Governance structures The CFIA has imposed an internal governance framework for the delivery of activities related to Food Safety Modernization. The CFIA's Senior Management Committee, chaired by the President, will provide direction for initiatives and is accountable for overall implementation. Three VP-level advisory committees responsible for each of the three elements (inspection system modernization, science, and IM/IT) will report to the Agency's Senior Management Committee and will be accountable for ensuring that activities are on track and on budget. Each will operate individual governance structures, led by a business sponsor and a dedicated project manager, with representation from all implicated areas. The Investment Governance Board provides the forum to ensure horizontal integration among the three elements.
Planning highlights

For 2015-16, high level business processes will be finalized for the integrated Agency inspection model (formerly known as the improved inspection delivery model). Project and expenditure approval was sought and was received for the IM/IT enablement of the integrated Agency inspection model and the export certification process (the Electronic Service Delivery Platform (ESDP) project). The CFIA plans to execute the Implementation Stage of the ESDP project. The activities include analyze, design, configure, develop, integrate, and test the technology and application solution. It also includes the testing, correcting, and preparing training materials. The ESDP project team will be working heavily with stakeholders on the design and configuration of the technical solution, including the validation of the end user experience.

With respect to the implementation of Health Canada's Listeria policy for non-meat ready-to-eat food, the Agency will continue staffing actions to provide additional inspection staff for inspection activities in high-risk areas, validate new laboratory methodologies for Listeria in non-meat commodities, and analyze additional food and environmental samples. CFIA subject matter experts will also provide refresher training to existing staff to keep inspectors current with emerging trends and developments related to their work. Adjustments to the core training program will occur as the new inspection model is developed and refined.

The Modernizing Equipment and Laboratories sub-projects at the GTA and St-Hyacinthe Food laboratories have moved into the Project Implementation stage. Additionally, the highly skilled scientists who were hired in targeted laboratories will continue research projects to develop novel, more rapid and sensitive detection methods to enhance the Agency's response to food safety incidents. They will also develop a new process for the development of tests in real-time in response to an outbreak. In the Integrated Laboratory Network initiative, the project team will continue to work in collaboration with partners and explore the concepts, processes, and mechanisms available to conduct a laboratory systems analysis of the Canadian food laboratory system. Partners will be engaged in exploring data and information requirements and opportunities in anticipation of future feasibility assessments, with respect to the use of existing feasibility assessments, or in the creation of an IM/IT platform for secure data sharing.

As part of the interrelated efforts to improve Canada's food safety system, the CFIA will continue to work with federal, provincial, and territorial (FPT) food safety partners to establish a Food Safety Information Network (FSIN). This initiative will leverage an existing web-based electronic platform used for Canadian public health and animal health networks to allow real-time sharing of food safety information and laboratory data among FPT food safety authorities. The FSIN will enhance food safety surveillance and laboratory response capacity across Canada to allow FPT food safety partners to improve their collective ability to anticipate, detect, and respond to foodborne threats and hazards.

Planned activities to increase efficiency in IM/IT will include a collaborative effort with Shared Services Canada (SSC) to create a new Data Centre Backup/Restore site to handle the increased requirements of modernized inspection systems. Improvements to end-user assets will continue with the distribution of more portable end-user devices and improved wireless network connectivity. The IM/IT Branch will continue consultations with their business partners in the Agency to modernize various components of the IM/IT infrastructure of the organization to better meet the needs of the inspectors in the field. The Agency will strengthen its information integration capability by introducing Agency-wide data standards. Planning will commence for desktop operating system and tool upgrading and standardization as well as for increased data storage and backup capacity.

Results to be achieved by non-federal and non-governmental partners Not Applicable
Contact information

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Steven Yafalian
Senior Advisor and Governance
Portfolio Coordination Office, Agency Transformation
613-773-5153

Health Canada
Samuel Godefroy
Director General, Food Directorate
Health Products and Food Branch
613-957-1821

Table Notes

Footnote 7

Total allocation (from start to end date) does not include $32,362,417 that has not yet received required TB approvals as of February 1st, 2015 and therefore remains earmarked in the Fiscal Framework.

Return to table note 7 referrer

Planning Information
Federal Partner Link to departmental Program Alignment Architectures Contributing programs and activities Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 2015–16 Planned SpendingTable Note 8 2015–16 Expected Results (ER) 2015–16 Targets (T)
Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) Food Safety Program/ Internal Services Inspection Modernization $70,813,333
(2011-12 to 2015-16)
$15,815,570 ER 23 T 23a
T 23b
T 23c
T 23d
Enhancing Scientific Capacity $19,800,000
(2011-12 to 2015-16)
$6,700,000 ER 24 T 24
Improved IM/IT $13,824,250
(2012-13 to 2015-16)
$4,100,000 ER 25 T 25
Health Canada (HC) Food Safety and Nutrition Enhancing Health Risk Assessment Capacity to Support CFIA Food Safety Inspection Activities $3,000,000
(2011-12 to 2015-16)
$700,000 ER 26 T 26
Total for all federal organizations $67,437,583
(new funding)
and
$40,000,000
(internal reallocation)
(2011-12 to 2015-16)
$27,315,570 Not applicable

Table Notes

Table Note 8

As per TBS RPP guidance, the 2015-16 planned spending numbers includes only those resources which have received TB approval as at February 1st, 2015. It does not include $12,891,374 of FSM funding earmarked for the CFIA and for which TB approval will be requested after February 1st, 2015.

Return to table note 8 referrer

ER 23: Inspection System Modernization

Integrated Agency Inspection Model (formally known as the Improved Inspection Delivery Model):

Outcome: The development and sequential implementation of an integrated Agency inspection model that will result in the improved management of food safety risks.

Outputs/activities: A single food inspection program will be developed in support of the CFIA's transformation agenda. The integrated Agency inspection model will include standard collection, reporting and analysis across all food commodities and will provide a more consistent inspection and enforcement approach for regulated parties.

T 23a: Targets:

  • Engagement of stakeholders both internally and externally to promote the understanding of the CFIA's transformation agenda.
  • Identification of high level business processes and vision of business functions to support the effective implementation of the integrated Agency inspection model.
  • Prioritization of key activities within the integrated Agency inspection model to support a sequenced transformation agenda.

Verifying Compliance with HC's Revised Listeria Policy

Outcome: Fewer illnesses caused by Listeria monocytogenes resulting from the consumption of high-risk, non-meat RTE foods.

Outputs and Activities: The Agency will enhance inspection and testing activities to verify industry control of Listeria in all high-risk, non-meat ready-to-eat (RTE) food. The Agency will increase the number of inspections and samples taken and analyzed and provide technical support for risk assessments resulting from positive findings. Sampling data will be used to support risk-based decision-making. Industry will be encouraged to implement preventative Listeria control programs. New Listeria testing methods will be validated and trend analysis will be developed.

T 23b: Targets: Number of non-meat RTE samples collected and analyzed.

Electronic Service Delivery Platform (ESDP) Project

Outcome: ESDP will provide a set of technologies and tools for citizens, Industry, and CFIA inspectors as they carry out their respective roles under the new inspection model. It will provide an electronic platform that will allow more readily access to CFIA programs and to conduct regular business transactions.

Outputs and Activities: ESDP will enable the Integrated Agency Inspection Model (IAIM) and the electronic delivery of export certificates. ESDP will seek to standardize and automate processes, provide information on resource utilization, activities, results and compliance issues; and provide operational performance data for analysis and tracking.

T 23c: Targets:

  • Provide more predictable, efficient, and reliable service to industry and thereby increase industry competitiveness and confidence.
  • Increase the effectiveness and transparency of the inspection process and thereby maintain the public's confidence in Canada's safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.
  • Maintain international trading partner confidence in Canada's export certification process thereby protecting access to Canada's export markets; Increase clarity of the per transaction costs of services to substantiate related user fees.
  • Partially offset ongoing ESDP support and maintenance costs.
  • Increase internal administrative and operational effectiveness by automating inspections activities.
  • Optimize inspection coverage by enabling management to continually reallocate the inspectorate to changing priorities throughout the year.
  • Efficiencies in reduction of applications that support licencing, inspection and certification activities

Recruitment and Training of Inspectors

Outcome: The development and implementation of a national recruitment strategy to provide inspection managers with qualified candidates when and where required. The training process for inspection staff within the CFIA will be designed to meet the requirements of the Integrated Agency Inspection Model.

Outputs and Activities: Build a culture of recruitment to increase the awareness of the Agency as an employer of choice, leverage technology to assess and place candidates more efficiently and develop strategy for remote locations. Training strategy for inspection community aligned with the competency-based curriculum for inspection staff.

T 23d: Targets:

  • Number of Agency employees trained.
  • Number of Agency inspectors trained.
ER 24: Enhancing Laboratory Response Capacity

Outcome:The CFIA is able to detect and respond faster to food safety hazards.

Outputs/activities: The number of highly skilled scientists in targeted laboratories will be enhanced through hiring additional scientists. New rapid, scientific, and sensitive food safety testing methods will be developed.

Targets:

  • Scientists hired.
  • Collaborative projects established with experts.
  • Enhanced and newly developed methods.

Modernizing Equipment and Laboratories

Outcome: Improved CFIA food laboratory capacity to detect and respond to food safety related hazards.

Outputs and Activities: Laboratory expansion and renovation of targeted laboratories will be completed. Laboratory equipment will be upgraded with the procurement of modern testing equipment.

T 24: Targets:

  • Expansion and Renovation projects completed on schedule.
  • Procurement of equipment.
ER 25: Improved IM/IT

Outcome: To provide the Agency and Agency staff with stable and up-to-date information management capabilities and tools that will enable the implementation and execution of the modernized inspection delivery model.

Outputs/activities: Information Management and Integration, information access to the front-line staff through increased connectivity and modernized applications.

T 25: Targets:

  • With data governance processes and business intelligence reporting established, these will be further strengthened and made more operational.
  • The foundations created for new, modernized applications, and an architecture program initiated, new infrastructure, processes and tools will continue to be introduced and mobility/connectivity will be assessed.
  • Overall, compliance with TBS policies on application portfolio management will be improved.
ER 26: Enhancing Health Risk Assessment Capacity to Support CFIA Food Safety Inspection Activities

Outcome: CFIA-led food safety investigations will be supported by timely health risk assessments that will further support swift action being taken to minimize/mitigate the potential exposure of Canadians to hazards in food associated illnesses.

Outputs/activities: Health Canada will build additional flexibility in its health risk assessment capacity to sustain its current level of service through the hiring of additional employees, ongoing training, review and analysis of health risk assessment activities, and the proactive development of new policies and guidelines, where appropriate.

T 26: Targets: 90% of HRAs at CFIA's request responded to within time standards.

General Information
Name of horizontal initiative Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) Renewal
Name of lead department(s) Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)
Federal partner organization(s) Health Canada (HC); Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)
Non-federal and non-governmental partner(s) Not Applicable
Start date of the horizontal initiative 2003-04, 2014-15 Renewal Core BSE program
End date of the horizontal initiative 2018-19
Total federal funding allocated (start to end date) $203,229,460 (from 2014-15 to 2018-19)
Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners Not Applicable
Description of the horizontal initiative To protect human and animal health, the BSE program conducts surveillance, research and risk assessments on BSE and other transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) to minimize the risk of exposure to infected materials, maintain consumer confidence through assessing the effectiveness of the risk mitigation measures and having measures in place to control any potential outbreaks; and supports market access for cattle, beef and related products through promoting and explaining Canada's BSE program to domestic and international stakeholders.

HC conducts research and risk assessments on human exposure to BSE and other TSEs, and the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) carries out surveillance of human TSEs and targeted supporting research in this areal. The CFIA enforces the removal of specified risk material (SRM) from the animal feed and the human food chains, monitors products entering and leaving Canada for adherence to Canadian standards or the standards of the importing country, monitors for the prevalence of BSE in the cattle population (through surveillance), verifies that measures to control potential outbreaks are in place and explains Canada's BSE control measures to domestic and international stakeholders (for example, through the veterinarians abroad program) in order to maintain confidence in Canada's BSE program. AAFC supports, stabilizes and repositions Canada's beef and cattle industry, including through the provision of compensation payments to stakeholders impacted by BSE in Canada.

Shared outcome(s) Contributing to the protection of human and animal health, which supports domestic and international market access for Canadian cattle, beef and beef products.
Governance structures The CFIA is the federal lead for BSE Program delivery. A summative evaluation of the CFIA's BSE program conducted in 2008 recommended the governance of the program be strengthened to enhance coordination and communication regarding BSE-related activities, both internally and with partner organizations. Based on that recommendation and consistent with governance models for related horizontal initiatives, the CFIA launched a new committee structure to bring the Agency's overall governance approach more in line with evolving business needs in 2010. The new governance structure focuses on the importance of sharing information internally and ensures a more efficient and streamlined senior-level committee structure. It is expected that the renewed structure will foster a whole-of-Agency approach to decision making and will support day-to-day operations across the Agency. To ensure business line perspectives are integrated into decision making, three senior executive-level committees Animal Health, Plant and Food Safety are supported.
Planning highlights For 2015-16, the key plans and priorities from a horizontal perspective are to continue to deliver the BSE Program by managing and monitoring BSE-related risks to current standards as well as to continue to improve communication and coordination (for example, governance), performance measurement and reporting, and financial tracking.
Results to be achieved by non-federal and non-governmental partners Not Applicable
Contact information

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Dr. Harpreet Kochhar
Chief Veterinary Officer / Executive Director, Animal Health Directorate
613-773-7472

Public Health Agency of Canada
Steven Sternthal
Director General
Centre for Food-borne, Environmental and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases
Infectious Disease Prevention and Control Branch
613-948-6883

Health Canada
Diana Dowthwaite
Director General, Resource Management & Operations Directorate,
Health Products and Food Branch,
613-957-6690

Planning Information
Federal Partner Link to departmental Program Alignment Architectures Contributing programs and activities Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 2015–16 Planned Spending 2015–16 Expected Results (ER) 2015–16 Targets (T)
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Animal Health and Zoonotics Program/ Food Safety Program/ International Collaboration and Technical Agreements / Internal Services SRM Removal from the Human Food Chain 45,946,160
(2014-15 to 2018-19)
9,189,232 ER 27 T 27
Import Controls 3,347,815
(2014-15 to 2018-19)
669,563 ER 28 T 28a
T 28b
BSE Surveillance 80,912,125
(2014-15 to 2018-19)
16,182,425 ER 29 T 29
Cattle Identification 10,672,140
(2014-15 to 2018-19)
2,134,428 ER 30 T 30a
T 30b
T 30c
T 30d
Export Certification 29,822,860
(2014-15 to 2018-19)
5,964,572 ER 31 T 31
Technical Market Access Support 22,794,635
(2014-15 to 2018-19)
4,558,927 ER 32 T 32
Health Canada Health Products Risk Assessment 1 538 882
(2014-15 to 2018-19)
302,461 ER 32 T 32a
T 32b
Food Safety and Nutrition Risk Assessment and standard setting 4 194 843
(2014-15 to 2018-19)
877,672 ER 33 T 33
PHAC Public Health Surveillance and Assessment Prion Diseases Program 4,000,000
(2014-15 to 2018-19)
800,000 ER 34 T 34
Total for all federal organizations $203,229,460
(from 2014-15 to 2018-19)
$40,679,280 Not applicable
ER 27: SRM Removal from the Human Food Chain

Outcome: Safe food.

Outputs: Compliance with current regulations.

Activities: Continuation of the enforcement and verification of SRM removal, handling and disposal by CFIA inspection staff.

Indicator: Industry compliance rate for removal of SRM.

T 27: Targets: 100% compliance

ER 28: Import Controls

Outcome: Products imported into Canada meet Canadian standards.

Output: Up-to-date import controls.

Activities: Review and update of current import policies and conditions for BSE as required, to reflect changes in international standards and evolving science.

Indicator 1: Percentage of import policies verified and updated as required.

T 28a: Targets: 25% per year.

Indicator 2: BSE Import Policy is verified and updated as required

T 28b: Targets: Annually, when the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) updates the BSE risk status country lists.

ER 29: BSE Surveillance

Outcome: Safe animals and food and Market access.

Outputs: Measurement of BSE level and distribution in cattle population.

Activities: Analysis of options to redesign the BSE surveillance program and consultation with stakeholders to explore further targeting of surveillance.

Indicator: Temporal trend in exposure to the BSE agent in the cattle population.

T 29: Targets: Testing 30,000 samples from the high-risk category of cattle is the minimum national target.

ER 30: Cattle Identification

Outcome:

  • Governments and other entities make informed decisions to manage animal and related human health issues
  • Risk to Canadian livestock resource base are mitigated
  • Canadian livestock sector is compliant with regulations

Outputs 1: Compliance verification and enforcement strategy; inspection reports; data quality audits; trace-out reports; letters of non-compliance; administrative penalties; prosecutions

Activities: Inspections, compliance verification, investigations and enforcement actions.

Outputs 2: Regulations; program and related policies; privacy impact assessment; threat risk assessment; Administrator agreement; tools for CFIA staff (e.g. program related policy, positions, manuals, SOPs, etc.)

Indicator 1: Number and development status of inspection tools in place

T 30a: Targets: Training, tools and materials are relevant and up-to-date.

Indicator 2: Number of inspectors trained

T 30b: Targets: All inspectors verifying compliance are trained.

Indicator 3: Ratio of non-compliances versus number of Compliance Verification System (CVS) tasks carried out by CFIA staff expressed as a percentage

T 30c: Targets: 95% compliance.

Indicator 4: Percentage of responses to disease and epidemiological investigations that are completed within service standards

T 30d: Targets: 100%.

ER 31: Export Certification

Outcome: Products exported from Canada meet requirements imposed by foreign countries.

Outputs: Export certification

Activities: Continue provision of export-related certification services to a wide range of affected industries.

Indicator 1: Percentage of exports meeting the standards of the importing country as required.

T 31: Targets: 100%

ER 32: Technical Market Access Support

Outcome: Maintain or improve confidence in Canada's animal production and food system, facilitating access to domestic and international markets.

Output: Increased market demand and confidence.

Activities: Continue the establish and maintain of strong relationships with trading partners, and the provision of global leadership and influence concerning international policies and standards development.

Indicator: Trends in market demand for Canadian bovines and beef products; media tracking for consumer confidence in beef in Canada.

T 32: Targets: An ongoing record of markets that are open, and exports of Canadian beef and cattle.

ER 33: Health Products Risk Assessment and Targeted Research

Immediate Outcome: Increased expertise and knowledge of BSE/TSE science, risks and product surveillance.

Indicator: Number and description/type of direct consultation/visits with stakeholder as a result of Canadian expertise.

Number and type of training conferences, symposiums, etc. attended by HC staff on BSE/TSE topics.

Number of reports related to progress in characterizing the risk for BSE/TSE introduction in support of preventive controls such as standard development

Health Risk Assessments conducted as a result of BSE suspicion by product line (i.e. biologics)

Number of products / product lots assessed for TSE (or TSE/BSE risks).

T 33a: Targets*:

  • Data analysis.
  • Research papers.
  • Laboratory studies.
  • Research findings.
  • Internal records.
  • Proceeds of scientific meetings.

Immediate Outcome: Increased knowledge-based decision-making.

Indicator: Number of reports related to policy considerations in support of standards, directives, regulations, policies and procedures changes.

T 33b: Targets*:

  • Data analysis
  • Risk assessments (including recommendations).
  • Internal records.
ER 34: Food Safety and Nutrition: Risk Assessment and Targeted Research

Immediate Outcome: Increased expertise and knowledge of BSE/TSE science, risks and product surveillance.

Indicators: Number of direct consultations/visits with stakeholders as a result of Canadian expertise

Number and type of training, conferences, symposiums, etc. attended by HC staff on BSE/TSE topics

Number of research publications related to BSE/TSE peer reviewed publications produced by HC

Number and amount of funds expended for external collaborations

Intermediate Outcome: Increased knowledge-based decision-making.

Indicators: Number of Health Risk Assessments conducted

Number and description of policies/standards on BSE/TSE contributed by HC to the international community

T 34: Targets*:

  • Data analysis.
  • Research papers.
  • Laboratory studies.
  • Research findings.
  • Risk assessments (including recommendations).
  • Incident reports.
  • Certificates.
  • Internal records.

*Note: Targets have yet to be determined.

ER 35: Prion Diseases Program

Outcome: Risks of human TSEs in Canada remain clearly defined and well controlled.

Output/Activities: Continued, detailed, case-by-case, laboratory-supported investigation of all human TSEs across Canada; improved methods and strategies for case investigation; comprehensive human TSE surveillance data; laboratory investigations of TSE diagnostics and biology; research publications; provision of policy advice for food safety, healthcare and international trade.

Indicators: Alignment of PHAC data from human TSE surveillance with international benchmarks; number of research presentations and publications; use of policy advice in decision-making.

T 35: Targets:

  • Maintenance of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease surveillance sensitivity at a level where observed mortality from all human TSEs in Canada is consistent with that observed internationally i.e. 1-2 per million population.
  • Number of research presentations; and research publications per year.
General Information
Name of horizontal initiative Food Safety Oversight (FSO)
Name of lead department(s) Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)
Federal partner organization(s) Health Canada (HC)
Non-federal and non-governmental partner(s) Not Applicable
Start date of the horizontal initiative 2014-15
End date of the horizontal initiative Ongoing
Total federal funding allocated (start to end date) $151,999,630 (2014-15 to 2018-19) and $35,606,377 ongoing

(includes CFIA and Health Canada)
2014-15: $15,873,766
2015-16: $24,607,196
2016-17: $40,305,915
2017-18: $35,606,377
2018-19 and ongoing: $35,606,377

Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners Not Applicable
Description of the horizontal initiative The objectives of this horizontal initiative are to strengthen the CFIA's and HC's food safety oversight of the fresh fruits and vegetables sector, the fish and seafood sector and the manufactured food products sector.

These objectives will be achieved through the implementation of new programming and increased oversight activities.

These objectives are aligned to the Government of Canada Outcome of "Healthy Canadians".

The two federal organizations, the CFIA and HC, received a total spending authority of $152 million over five years and 35.6 million on an ongoing basis for this initiative.

Shared outcome(s) To strengthen Canada's food safety oversight system by implementing a preventive food safety program for fresh fruit and vegetables and resources to increase food safety oversight in the fish and seafood and the manufactured food products sectors.
Governance structures The CFIA and HC currently work horizontally in delivering their shared food safety mandates. This is supported by a memorandum of understanding (MOU), signed in 2008, which provides the foundation for building a clear understanding of their respective roles and responsibilities as they relate to human health and to provide links across the organizations to improve the design and delivery of integrated health-related solutions.

A governance model exists for the partner organizations to regularly convene and discuss food safety issues of mutual concern and responsibility.

This governance framework includes an Assistant Deputy Minister-level and Director General-level Committees on Food Safety that meet regularly to discuss and plan approaches for addressing joint food safety issues.

CFIA and HC will continue to work horizontally through these governance committees. As complementary components of the health portfolio, the two organizations will report results within an integrated, collaborative performance measurement framework.

Planning highlights In 2015-16, the CFIA will continue to phase in the implementation of a preventive food safety program for the fresh fruit and vegetable program that reflects modern approaches to food safety in this sector.

Also, as part of the FSO initiative, the CFIA will be providing functional direction, training to staff and guidance to industry.

In further support of the FSO initiative, there will be additional resources allocated to conduct food safety inspections in the fresh fruit and vegetable, fish and seafood, and manufactured food sectors. These inspections will further enhance food safety practices within the industry

CFIA will also be conducting foreign country assessments in priority areas to enhance the safety of imported food products.

To support these changes and ensure that resource allocations are as efficient and effective as possible, training of health risk assessors will be conducted by HC and the relative hazards in high-risk non-meat foods will be characterized.

Health Canada will incrementally increase its capacity for standard setting activities that support the new and enhanced CFIA programming in high-risk non-meat foods. HC will initiate work to characterize the relative hazards of targeted pathogens and/or contaminants in high-risk non-meat foods, such as fresh fruit and vegetables, infant formula, human milk fortifiers, contaminants in fish and seafood. Activities to be undertaken include: risk ranking and risk profiling to prioritize analytical method development work, exposure assessments (using up to date food consumption and market share data and other surveillance and monitoring information), as well as, identification and potential implementation of appropriate risk management measures (depending on progress of risk characterization work).

HC will also incrementally increase its capacity for the Health Risk Assessment activities to support the incremental increase in this activity resulting from the new and enhanced CFIA programming activities.

Results to be achieved by non-federal and non-governmental partners Not Applicable
Contact information

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Dr. Richard Arsenault
Executive Director
Program Performance and Emergency Management Directorate
Policy and Programs Branch
Telephone: 613-773-6156

Health Canada
Samuel Godefroy
Director General
Food Directorate
Health Products and Food Branch
Telephone: 613-957-1821

Planning Information
Federal Partner Link to departmental Program Alignment Architectures Contributing programs and activities Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 2015–16 Planned Spending 2015–16 Expected Results (ER) 2015–16 Targets (T)
Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) Food Safety Program Preventive Food Safety Program Management 11,786,965
(2014-15 to 2018-19)
and
2,138,827 ongoing
2,495,885 ER 36 T 36
Enhanced Inspection Activities 90,809,417
(2014-15 to 2018-19)
and
22,189,785 ongoing
13,037,119 ER 37 T 37
Increased Sampling, Testing, and Analysis 22,283,451
(2014-15 to 2018-19)
and
5,411,341 ongoing
3,756,838 ER 38 T 38a
T 38b
Foreign Country Assessments 6,293,373
(2014-15 to 2018-19)
and
1,245,327 ongoing
1,245,327 ER 39 T 39
Health Canada (HC) Food Safety and Nutrition Standard Setting 14,246,254
(2014-15 to 2018-19)
and
3,080,927 ongoing
2,805,865 ER 40a
ER 40b
ER 40c
ER 40d
T 40a
T 40b
T 40c
T 40d
Health Risk Assessments 6,580,170
(2014-15 to 2018-19)
and
1,540,170 ongoing
1,266,160 ER 41 T 41
Total for all federal organizations $151,999,630
(2014-15 to 2018-19)
and
$35,606,377 ongoing
$24,607,194 Not applicable

Expected Results and Targets

ER 36: Expected Results: Preventive Food Safety Program Management

Strengthened design and management of Preventive Food Safety Programing

T 36: Targets: List of events and materials to support program delivery

ER 37: Expected Result: Enhanced Inspection Activities

Increase to Inspection activities to the non-meat food areas.

T 37: Targets: Number of inspections conducted in the non-meat food area.

ER 38: Expected Result: Increased Sampling, Testing, and Analysis

Increased Sampling, Testing, and Analysis.

T 38a: Targets: Sample testing reports, results and analysis completed in the non-meat food areas.

T 38b: Targets: Validated methods developed and implemented to support increased testing in the non-meat food areas.

ER 39: Expected Result: Foreign Country Assessments

Increased Foreign Country Assessments of priority areas.

T 39: Targets: Establish baseline of foreign country assessments and show increase of foreign country assessments.

ER 40a: Expected Result: Standard Setting

Development of new and/or updated standards is initiated in 100% of cases where there is an identified need to do so in order to address food safety risks

T 40a: Targets: 100% of cases where there is an identified need to do so in order to address food safety risks.

ER 40b: Expected Result: Standard Setting

Number and type of involvement activities associated with standard setting initiatives

T 40b: Targets: TBD since it will depend on the number and type of standards being developed.

ER 40c: Expected Result: Standard Setting

Number of risk assessments developed in support of standard setting initiatives

T 40c: Targets: TBD since it will depend on the number and type of standards being developed.

ER 40d: Expected Result: Standard Setting

Number of detection methods developed and enhanced in support of standard setting initiatives

T 40d: Targets: TBD since it will depend on the number and type of standards being developed.

ER 41: Expected Result: Health Risk Assessments

Timely response to emerging food and nutrition safety incidents including foodborne illness outbreaks

T 41: Targets: 90% of health risk assessment provided to CFIA within standard timelines to manage food safety incidents

General Information
Name of horizontal initiative Food Safety Information Network (FSIN)
Name of lead department(s) Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)
Federal partner organization(s) Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), the Public Health Agency, and Health Canada (HC)
Non-federal and non-governmental partner(s) Not Applicable
Start date of the horizontal initiative 2014-15
End date of the horizontal initiative 2018-19
Total federal funding allocated (start to end date) $15,606,877
Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners Not Applicable
Description of the horizontal initiative Funding to Establish a Food Safety Information Network to strengthen the ability to anticipate, detect, and respond to food hazards. The FSIN will link federal, provincial and territorial (FPT) food safety authorities and food testing laboratories across Canada to facilitate the sharing of surveillance information and food safety data.
Shared outcome(s)
  • Integrated and strengthened national laboratory capacity and capability to respond to food safety incidents and emergencies;
  • Enhanced, coordinated, preventive and risk-based approach to food safety oversight;
  • An automated early warning system for food safety authorities; and
  • A pan-Canadian approach to food safety surveillance to better demonstrate system effectiveness to trading partners.
Governance structures The CFIA's Vice President, Science is the Executive Sponsor for the implementation of the FSIN. The Executive Sponsor chairs an interdepartmental governance committee for FSIN implementation oversight and governance. For horizontality and transparency, a provincial member of the Steering Committee also participates. The Senior Management Committee (SMC), chaired by the President, will provide direction for the initiative and is accountable for overall implementation of the FSIN.

The CFIA, HC, and the PHAC work horizontally in delivering their shared food safety mandates and meet regularly to discuss food safety issues of mutual concern. Additional regularly scheduled, targeted discussions regarding the implementation of the FSIN also occur.

A separate FPT Steering Committee provides input on the direction of FSIN implementation, and provides input and feedback on key planning documents.

Planning highlights Data support, coordination, environmental scanning, and outreach activities to implement the network among FPT food safety authorities and food safety laboratories. This includes:
  • collaboration with partners to develop data and information-sharing agreements;
  • developing a common data dictionary for food safety; and
  • identifying the key food safety data elements that will be shared for data aggregation and analysis.

Further advancing activities initiated in 2014-15, the CFIA will, in partnership with the PHACHC and provinces and territories, continue to build the collaborative network and plan the technical infrastructure required to share food safety data. The FSIN will leverage the Public Health Agency's existing web-based platform, the Canadian Network for Public Health Intelligence (CNPHI), to support data and information sharing and collaboration among FPT food safety authorities and food testing laboratories. The CFIA will also integrate multiple data repositories to ensure that complete, robust data sets are available for trending and analysis.

In 2015-16, project documentation will be developed to support subsequent funding requirements. This includes the development of a Performance Measurement Framework, Project Charter and Business Case to seek Treasury Board approval for the next project phase of the FSIN initiative.

Results to be achieved by non-federal and non-governmental partners Not Applicable
Contact information

Bashir Manji
Executive Director, Food Safety Science Directorate
1400 Merivale Road, Tower 2
Floor 5, Room 105
Ottawa ON K1A 0Y9
Telephone: 613-773-6431
Bashir.Manji@inspection.gc.ca

Planning Information
Federal Partner Link to departmental Program Alignment Architectures Contributing programs and activities Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)Table Note 9 2015–16 Planned Spending 2015–16 Expected Results (ER) 2015–16 Targets (T)
Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) Food Safety Program

Internal Services
Data Support, Coordination and Outreach 9,901,987 2,252,442 ER 42 T 42
Environmental Scanning 1,060,365 251,138 ER 43 T 43
Enhanced IM/IT architecture 3,104,889 1,532,963 ER 44 T 44
Public Health Agency of Canada Public Health Infrastructure Program Development of new Food Safety module on CNPHI platform 368,839 209,977 ER 45 T 45
Health Canada Data Support, Coordination and Outreach 1,170,797 263,423 ER 46 T 46
Total for all federal organizations $15,606,877 $4,509,943 Not applicable

Table Notes

Table Note 9

A total of $42,364,328 of federal funding is to be allocated to the initiative. However, CFIA and its partners will be seeking access to this funding in phases over the life of the initiative. A total of $15,606,877 over 5 fiscal years has been approved and is included in the planned spending amounts presented in this 2015-16 RPP. Planned spending amounts will be updated accordingly as future TB approvals are received. The above amounts do not include in-kind contribution funding made by the CFIA or HC.

Return to table note 9 referrer

ER 42: Data Support, Coordination and Outreach

Outcome: Improve and strengthen the availability and reliability of food testing capacity and capabilities across Canada.

Output / Activities: The CFIA will begin outreach activities with federal, Provincial, and Territorial (FPT) partners to confirm participation in the FSIN through bilateral data sharing opportunities. The CFIA will also expand outreach and engagement with private laboratories including activities associated with laboratory quality management and accreditation. The CFIA, with its partners, will begin the development of a common food safety data dictionary and identification of data elements to be shared.

T 42: Targets: Minimum of one data sharing agreement signed in 2015-16. Completed draft data dictionary to support data sharing and integration activities.

ER 43: Environmental Scanning

Outcome: Better understand incidents, technological trends, and emerging issues that could affect the safety of Canada's food supply.

Output / Activities: Working with FPT partners to advance a more collaborative and systematic approach to identifying new and emerging threats to the food supply, tracking new scientific findings or social concerns, and monitoring domestic and international trends in food safety to improve food safety programs. Begin development for a pan-Canadian systematic approach to searching and cataloguing intelligence and information more collaborative and coordinated.

T 43: Targets: An inventory of environmental scanning and intelligence data.

ER 44: Enhanced IM/IT Architecture

Outcome: CFIA data sources for food safety testing results are aggregated and can be used for trending and analysis in support of food safety programs and policy development. Complete the FSIN project deliverables (for this phase of the FSIN initiative).

Output / Activities: Develop the FSIN project deliverables to seek Treasury Board approval (for the next project phase of the FSIN initiative).

T 44: Targets: Complete project documentation to support further approval for the next project phase of the FSIN initiative fall 2015.

ER 45: Development of the new Food Safety module on CNPHI platform

Outcome: Completion of Requirements Gathering and of preliminary Configuration for new food safety sub-modules that are not data dependent.

T 45: Targets: 100% completion by 2015-16 of Requirements Gathering for sub-modules that are not data dependent, and 40% completion by 2015-16 of Configuration for these sub-modules.

ER 46: Data Support, Coordination and Outreach

Outcome: Improved ability of government agencies and the industry to anticipate prepare and efficiently respond to food safety issues and emergencies.

Output/Activities: Coordination and outreach support that primarily support FSIN and expanded use of CANLINE within Health Canada food science labs.

Performance Measures: Outreach and training sessions held with Health Canada Food Directorate's research and regulatory community; new CANLINE user accounts created.

Upcoming Internal Audits and Evaluations Over the Next Three Fiscal Years

A. Internal audits
Title of Internal Audit Internal Audit Type Status Expected Completion Date
Audit of Staffing Assurance Planned 2015/2016
Audit of Major IT Application (SAP) Assurance Planned 2015/2016
Audit of Complaints and Appeals Process Assurance Planned 2016/2017 (tentative)
Audit of Emergency Management Assurance Planned 2016/2017 (tentative)
Audit of Recordkeeping Assurance Planned 2016/2017 (tentative)
Audit of Issuance and Administration of Licenses to Regulated Parties Assurance Planned 2017/2018 (tentative)
Audit of Fleet Management Assurance Planned 2017/2018 (tentative)
Audit of IM/IT Assurance Planned 2017/2018 (tentative)

*Audits identified as "Planned" may be subject to change due to shifting of priorities based on annual evaluation of risk elements. The new proposed audit projects for fiscal years 2015-2016 to 2017-2018 will be approved in 2015.

Electronic Link to Internal Audit Plan (if publicly available): N/A

CFIA audit reports

B. Evaluations
Link to Departmental Program Alignment Architecture Title of the Evaluation Planned Evaluation Start Date Planned Deputy Head Approval Date
Plant Resources Program 6200, Plant Protection 6210 Plant Protection August 2013 March 2015
Food Safety Program 6300, Meat and Poultry 6340 Meat and Poultry April 2014 December 2016
Food Safety Program 6300 Food Safety Program – Part 1 December 2014 December 2015
Animal Health and Zoonotics 4100, Terrestrial Animal Health 4110, Feed 4120, National Aquatic Animal Health 4130 Federal Assistance Program January 2015 December 2015
Animal Health and Zoonotics 4100, Terrestrial Animal Health 4110 Terrestrial Animal Health January 2016 March 2018
Food Safety Program 6300 Food Safety Program – Part 2 April 2016 June 2018
Animal Health and Zoonotics 4100, National Aquatic Animal Health 4130 National Aquatic Animal Health October 2017 December 2019
Plant Resources Program 6200, Seed 6220 Seed October 2017 September 2019
Plant Resources Program 6200, Intellectual Property Rights 6240 Intellectual Property Rights October 2017 September 2019
Animal Health and Zoonotics Program 4100, Feed 4120 Feed October 2017 September 2019
Plant Resources Program 6200, Fertilizer 6230 Fertilizer October 2017 September 2019

Electronic link to evaluation plan (if available on the departmental Website): N/A

CFIA evaluation reports

User Fees and Regulatory Charges

Name of User Fee (New or Amended): Fees for overtime service (amended)
Fee Type: Other products and services
Fee-setting Authority: CFIA Act
Reason for Planned Introduction of or Amendment to a Fee: to align fees with current costs; ongoing review cycle
Effective Date of Planned Change of existing fee or introduction of new fee: TBD
Consultation and Review Process Planned: Consultation completed (Oct 2012-Jan 2013); was tabled in both Houses of Parliament Jan/Feb 2014
Name of User Fee (New or Amended): Animal Health export inspection, testing and certification fees (amended)
Fee Type: Regulatory
Fee-setting Authority: CFIA Act
Reason for Planned Introduction of or Amendment to a Fee: to align fees with current costs
Effective Date of Planned Change of existing fee or introduction of new fee: TBD
Consultation and Review Process Planned: TBD
Name of User Fee (New or Amended): Single Food Program User Fee Structure (new and amended)
Fee Type: Regulatory
Fee-setting Authority: CFIA Act
Reason for Planned Introduction of or Amendment to a Fee: Regulatory Modernization and Creation of Single Food Program
Effective Date of Planned Change of existing fee or introduction of new fee: TBD
Consultation and Review Process Planned: TBD
Name of User Fee (New or Amended): Feed Program fees for product registrations and other products or services (new and amended).
Fee Type: Regulatory (Product registration fees) and other products and services.
Fee-setting Authority: CFIA Act
Reason for Planned Introduction of or Amendment to a Fee: To align fees with current costs; ongoing review cycle
Effective Date of Planned Change of existing fee or introduction of new fee: TBD
Consultation and Review Process Planned: TBD
Name of User Fee (New or Amended): Fertilizer Program fees for product registrations and other products or services (new and amended).
Fee Type: Regulatory (Product registration fees) and other products and services.
Fee-setting Authority: CFIA Act
Reason for Planned Introduction of or Amendment to a Fee: To align fees with current costs; ongoing review cycle
Effective Date of Planned Change of existing fee or introduction of new fee: TBD
Consultation and Review Process Planned: TBD

Tax Expenditures and Evaluations Report

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication. The tax measures presented in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Section IV: Organizational Contact Information

Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)
1400 Merivale Road,
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0Y9
Canada
Telephone: 800-442-2342 / 613-773-2342
Internet: Contact Us

Appendix: Definitions

appropriation: Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

budgetary expenditures: Include operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.

Departmental Performance Report: Reports on an appropriated organization's actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Reports on Plans and Priorities. These reports are tabled in Parliament in the fall.

full-time equivalent: Is a measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

Government of Canada outcomes: A set of 16 high-level objectives defined for the government as a whole, grouped in four spending areas: economic affairs, social affairs, international affairs and government affairs.

Management, Resources and Results Structure: A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization's inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.

non-budgetary expenditures: Include net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

performance: What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve and how well lessons learned have been identified.

performance indicator: A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.

performance reporting: The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.

planned spending: For Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) and Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs), planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their RPPs and DPRs.

plans: The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.

priorities: Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).

program: A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.

Program Alignment Architecture: A structured inventory of an organization's programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.

Report on Plans and Priorities: Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated organizations over a three-year period. These reports are tabled in Parliament each spring.

results: An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization's influence.

Strategic Outcome: A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization's mandate, vision and core functions.

sunset program: A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.

target: A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.

whole-of-government framework: Maps the financial contributions of federal organizations receiving appropriations by aligning their Programs to a set of 16 government-wide, high-level outcome areas, grouped under four spending areas.

Endnotes

Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act: http://laws.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/C-16.5/
Agriculture and Agri-Food Administrative Monetary Penalties Act: http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/A-8.8/
Food and Drug Act: http://laws.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/F-27/
Safe Food for Canadians Act: http://laws.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/S-1.1/
Canada Agricultural Products Act: http://laws.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/C-0.4/
Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act: http://laws.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/C-38/
Fish Inspection Act: http://laws.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/F-12/
Meat Inspection Act: http://laws.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/M-3.2/
Fertilizers Act: http://laws.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/F-10/
Plant Breeders' Rights Act:http://laws.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/P-14.6/
Plant Protection Act: http://laws.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/P-14.8/
Seed Act: http://laws.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/S-8/
Health of Animals Act: http://laws.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/H-3.3/
Feeds Act: http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/F-9/
Whole-of-government framework, http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/ppg-cpr/frame-cadre-eng.aspx
2015–16 Main Estimates, http://publiservice.tbs-sct.gc.ca/ems-sgd/esp-pbc/me-bpd-eng.asp
Pathogen Reduction Initiative: http://www.inspection.gc.ca/food/meat-and-poultry-products/program-changes/pathogen-reduction/eng/1338819927004/1338819992816
Agriculture Growth Bill: http://www.inspection.gc.ca/about-the-cfia/newsroom/news-releases/2013-12-09/eng/1386435526001/1386435540960
Project Management Capacity Assessment: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/pm-gp/doc/ompca-ecogp/ompca-ecogp-eng.asp
Departmental Sustainability Development Strategy: http://www.inspection.gc.ca/about-the-cfia/accountability/reports-to-parliament/2015-16-rpp/eng/1422025285418/1422025287652#s3b
Federal Policy on Green Procurement: http://www.tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca/ecologisation-greening/achats-procurement/politique-policy-eng.html
Future-Oriented Statement of Operations: http://www.inspection.gc.ca/about-the-cfia/accountability/reports-to-parliament/financial-reporting/eng/1336506187437/1336506285481
Section 3 Supplementary Information: http://www.inspection.gc.ca/about-the-cfia/accountability/reports-to-parliament/2015-16-rpp/eng/1422025285418/1422025287652#s3
Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication, http://www.fin.gc.ca/purl/taxexp-eng.asp

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